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Anousheh Ansari Blogs From Space 67

gevmage writes "Anousheh Ansari, founder of the X Prize and the fourth 'space tourist' to the International Space Station is going to be writing a blog during her several day visit, which began this last Wednesday. She says in the current entry that her submissions are batched and she doesn't have a live browser to read comments." From the post: "The next morning when I woke up, I was so excited I slipped out of my bag quickly and flew head down to the Descent Module and flipped around and flew right back up to the Habitation Compartment. As soon as I stopped I realized that what I did was not a good idea! I felt my internal organs doing a cha-cha inside my belly ... I stopped and tried to minimize my movements. I basically become a mummy from that point forward. I only did very small slow movements and even that would make me feel really sick ..."
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Anousheh Ansari Blogs From Space

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  • She is so hot (Score:3, Informative)

    by Anonymous Coward on Saturday September 23, 2006 @03:47AM (#16165647)
    Seriously, she is hot and likes space. :D :D
  • by ResidntGeek ( 772730 ) on Saturday September 23, 2006 @03:54AM (#16165669) Journal
    ...the enemy's gate is down.
    • Gravity at the ISS is about nine tenths of that on Earth surface. Yet, ISS is on orbit, what causes the conditions of weightlessness on board. Try to jump to get on an Earth orbit for a while -- you feel weightlessness during that, but you are still in the gravity field of g = 9.81 m/s2.
      • Re: (Score:2, Informative)

        by Anonymous Coward
        Correct. The ISS actually succeeds in knowing how to fly in the Douglass Adams sense because it continously throws itself at the Earth, but misses.

        It amazes me sometimes that many people actually think there is no gravitational force in space. A 6371 km radius Earth, and somehow a mere 400 km more and gravity ceases? Obviously it does not compute.
        • by iocat ( 572367 )
          I think we can safely say "zero g" when the person is perceptually experiencing no or extremely low gravity. Obviously gravity doesn't cease working outside the atmosphere, but common, saying "perceived weightlessness" or something would get pretty lame.
    • That's an "Ender's Game" reference, for the curious.
  • She has clearly not read a lot of Heinlein before the trip. Tut, tut.

    • She has clearly not read a lot of Heinlein

      Were you thinking: Farmer in the Sky?

      I am sorry she is having such a hard time. It would be a shame if she blows $20M and is sick the whole time.

      • Yes, mainly, but also Space Cadet and some others I cannot pinpoint. It was a favorite idea of Heinlein :o)

    • She has clearly not read a lot of Heinlein before the trip
      Well at least she didn't have to suffer in advance as well then.

      Uh oh.

  • by otherniceman ( 180671 ) on Saturday September 23, 2006 @04:15AM (#16165713)
    Shouldn't that be Bloogggggs in Spaaaaaaaaaaaaace?
  • I basically become a mummy from that point forward. I only did very small slow movements and even that would make me feel really sick ..."

    I bet it'd be neat in space, but it should be mandatory training to get a acclimated to the perils of being in space. Surely if you can afford to be a space tourist you can afford to get some lessons. They don't send scuba divers in the ocean without training.

    It would be a really neat experience to see the stars without the obstruction of atmosphere.

  • by pipingguy ( 566974 ) * on Saturday September 23, 2006 @04:31AM (#16165773) Homepage
    Looking at her website, this woman apparently engages in adventurous stuff like guns and pyrotechnics. Since the site's photos are Flash, I had to screencap this one where she seems to enjoy setting people's heads on fire [canadacomments.com].

    Sure, space tourism for civilians is good and all but do we really want a pyromaniac up there?
    • by mnmn ( 145599 )
      An Iranian woman interested in guns and pyrotechnics...

      I thought muslims were strictly forbidden to do that in America.

      Maybe now theres a sleeper cell in the ISS.
  • Does this immediate sickness after some movement rule out the development of zero-g sports being developed?
    If it does, this sucks big time..
    • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

      Does this immediate sickness after some movement rule out the development of zero-g sports being developed? If it does, this sucks big time..

      I personally find sea kayaking to be a pretty nausiating sport but I keep going back to it.

  • by quigonn ( 80360 ) on Saturday September 23, 2006 @04:37AM (#16165793) Homepage
    She experimentally proved that the iPod works in zero gravity. Now that's an achievement.
    • by cavac ( 640390 )
      How does she get power after she drainded the accus?

      Did she take an ISS compatible charger or solar sails to re-charge it. Or is it one of those new, experimental "iHamster perpetual motion" devices that can work on any available grain?
    • Actually, it would be interesting to see how long the iPod lasts in the radiation environment of space. Imagine a space tourist going to the moon, and having his or her iPod suddenly drop dead from a solar flare.

      Coincidentally, a few days ago, I went to the exhibits of the Space 2006 conference in San Jose. I had a discussion with some exhibitors of rad-hard equipment for space. They suggested that the iPod might last a day or a week. I suspect the ISS is sufficiently shielded for it to last more than a

  • Welcome to the blogosphere without atmosphere.
  • by MarkByers ( 770551 ) on Saturday September 23, 2006 @05:06AM (#16165879) Homepage Journal
    is going to be writing a blog during her several day visit, which began this last Wednesday. She says in the current entry

    I never got my head around that time dilation effect.
  • ...my first thought was "hmmm zero g sweeet love makin`". Any mentions of that?
  • Not to nitpick... (Score:3, Informative)

    by tgd ( 2822 ) on Saturday September 23, 2006 @07:02AM (#16166165)
    Not to nitpick or lessen her contribution to the X-prize, but she was NOT a founder, she was the person who coughed up the money fairly close to the end to actually pay for the prize. I don't believe she had anything to do with founding it.
    • Re: (Score:3, Informative)

      by FleaPlus ( 6935 ) *
      Correct, Anousheh was the main funder, not the founder. The founder is Peter Diamandis, who is the other main poster on the linked blog.
  • by ivi ( 126837 ) on Saturday September 23, 2006 @07:07AM (#16166181)
    The Astronauts are almost all Radio Amateurs and there's both voice &
    data Amateur Radio equipment to toy with up there (& lots of classes
    of school kids happy to speak with a Space Traveller.

    For a real buzz (ie, after viewing Earth from Space & all the Science
    experiments has been done), this Space Tourist should really try to
    make a connection or three with some Muslim schools; I think it would
    even be a first (as most of the schools that are selected from the
    queue are from USA, I understand).

    If anyone can get the suggestion up there to her, maybe she'll be kind
    enough to give such schools (or any schools or other Hams she might
    find on-the-air, for that matter) a Big Thrill, as well as a model of
    what's possible - these days - for a woman of means to do.

    Oh, for those who'd like to listen to on-air chats with the ISS, the
    place to go for dates/times, frequencies & pass predictions is:

        http://heavens-above.com/ [heavens-above.com]

    Eg, select your location - eg, someplace in United Arab Emerates - & go
    - from the selection page to a page like this one:

        http://heavens-above.com/PassSummary.asp?lat=25.70 8&lng=55.797&alt=21&loc=Al+Hamra'&TZ=UAEST&satid=2 5544 [heavens-above.com]

    It's also possible to display info for LOTS of Amateur Radio equipped
    satellites which are likely 'visible' from your location, eg, here:

        http://heavens-above.com/amateursats.asp?lat=25.70 8&lng=55.797&alt=21&loc=Al+Hamra'&TZ=UAEST [heavens-above.com]

    (Not knowing any place names in the UAR, I just picked one from the list that came up,
    in response to my entering "*" for Town/City, to get each of the following URLs.)

    Enjoy & let us know what you hear!
    • by kfg ( 145172 ) *
      this Space Tourist should really try to
      make a connection or three with some Muslim schools; I think it would
      even be a first (as most of the schools that are selected from the
      queue are from USA, I understand).


      There are Muslim schools in the USA. There are Christian schools in Iran. They are religions, not countries or races.

      KFG
  • I know satellites are directional, but there are several satellites up that provide terrestial internet, could one not be adapted to provide internet access for the space station, so that astronauts could blog/e-mail in real time, etc.
    • by khallow ( 566160 )
      Antennas are pretty easy to set up. I gather the real problem is that you have to worry about interference with the other electrical equipment up there. 802.11b or 802.11g, for example, is about good enough though you'd have to acquire a new ground wireless hub every few minutes as you orbit around the Earth.
    • by ZSpade ( 812879 )
      I'm pretty sure the space station is specifically shielded to keep OUT radiation, communication or otherwise. It seems to me you would probably need a receiver on the outside of the station for any sort of decent connection, not to mention all of the electrical equipment on-board that might interfere. The thought crossed my mind for a couple seconds too though.
  • One thing I found amusing about her blog. She describes space as smelling sorta like a "burnt almond cookie" or "cooking" after they docked with the ISS. I never knew that space "smelled" like anything. I wonder if there is a silly technobable answer as to why this is. Maybe this is just the little kid in me but that is so cool.
    • by FleaPlus ( 6935 ) *
      She was referring to the air onboard the station -- I rather doubt she's spending any time outside the station without a spacesuit.
    • by CFBMoo1 ( 157453 )
      They did have that one accident recently where they had to clean out the air. That might be whats left over from that accident.
    • Actually I believe this was before the air from the ISS got into the airlock. I think the idea is that some of the "local" atmosphere is trapped between the Soyuz and ISS doors and "flavours" the air when the doors open.

      Whether it happens or not, I don't know. I'd certainly like to be in a position to determine that for myself 8-)

    • Of course it's not 'space' that smells, but IMHO there is a slight excess of perhaps cyanide and/or ozone generated from the HV electrical equipment.
      I would smell this peculiar aroma when, in my days as a techie, we first unpacked a new CRT monitor and turned it on.
      Oddly, whenever this burnt chocolate /almond smell would appear, I'd ask the other techies what this chocolate smell was, but they could never smell it...
      I attributed it to some inside packing or electrical i
    • Burnt food seems to be a popular description of the odor she's talking about. Here's a bit from Bill Shepherd's ISS Expedition 2 log for November 19, 2000. The Sergei he's referring to here is cosmonaut Sergei Krikalev:

      Sergei led the way into the top of the Progress. Sergei said the nose of the docking probe "smells like space". It did have kind of a burnt toast odor to it--very faint.

      More of the same log, with some editing, can be found here. [nasa.gov]

  • I just asked on her blog site if she can figure out how to dance in zero g - shes got the tunes with the ipod but can you groove in space? This is of exceptional research importance, because no one is going to want to go into space if you cant party - and to me it seems that dancing is an essential party of partying.

    What else should a tourist be doing in space to check it out for the rest of us earthbound folks?
    (And before all you hormone laden slashdotters ask the obvious - remember Anousheh is married and

"Mr. Spock succumbs to a powerful mating urge and nearly kills Captain Kirk." -- TV Guide, describing the Star Trek episode _Amok_Time_

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