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Comment Re: Not gonna happen (Score 1) 144

Why should a capitalist corporation bother investing in developing fusion when governments are doing the spending for them? Since they have the politicians in their back pockets they will have no difficulty getting access to the technology for free if it ever succeeds. Big Oil is just investment capital looking for an investment, research is what the public pay for with their taxes.

Comment Re:Reads Like An Ad (Score 2, Interesting) 144

And does nothing to dispel the belief that fusion is fifty years in the future. And it has been fifty years in the future for the last fifty years. Given the recent success of renewables and advancing battery and storage technology, fusion is unlikely to ever see the light of day. The funding will soon be diverted into military spending for the coming global war between populist fascist states in any case. Who needs science and experts when there is a war against immigrants and foreigners to be fought.

Comment Re:Welcome to the Trump future... (Score 1) 459

It is a pity that this sort of reasoning is not available to Americans because their super rich have managed to use propaganda to fool the people into believing in Murcia, freedom and dog eat dog economics instead. Frankly if people are so stupid I say laugh at them dying, the world is better off without them. Just remember that they are the opposite of the actual free world. It is long past time that we stopped believing that American philosophy has anything useful to learn from.

Comment Re:What kind of farm? (Score 1) 134

It is also undoubtedly true that MP's are examined by all of the 40 odd agencies given access to the internet browsing history of the UK population, the only difference is that any data found cannot be used in a court of law to screw the bastards. No doubt the police will just plant or make up evidence as necessary.

Comment Re:This is what happens... (Score 2) 394

The only people in recent recorded history to wave a gun at the government were in dispute over land rights with its tree hugging arm. The next nearest thing likely to happen is lynching of foreigners and brown people. So no the gun owners are largely useful idiots who only respond to primal instincts and are easily manipulated. UN tanks and FEMA death camps my backside.

Comment Re:Encrypt! (Score 2) 394

Who cares what you send, they know how you think because an algorithm looks at the web sites you visit and decides which box you belong in. It must be a right pain switching all the Russian site readers out of the terrorist box and moving all the Arab news site readers in to replace them to align with Trump. Expect Tor and VPN to be made illegal shortly.

Submission + - NASA X-Ray Tech Could Enable Superfast Communication In Deep Space (space.com)

An anonymous reader writes: New technology could use X-rays to transmit data at high rates over vast distances in outer space, as well as enable communications with hypersonic vehicles during re-entry, when radio communications are impossible, NASA scientists say. The technology would combine multiple NASA projects currently in progress to demonstrate the feasibility of X-ray communications from outside the International Space Station. The radio waves used by mobile phones, Wi-Fi and, of course, radios, are one kind of light. Other forms of light can carry data as well; for instance, fiber-optic telecommunications rely on pulses of visible and near-infrared light. The effort to use another type of light, X-rays, for communication started with research on NASA's proposed Black Hole Imager. That mission is designed to analyze the edges of the supermassive black holes that previous research suggested exist at the centers of most, if not all, large galaxies. One potential strategy to enable the Black Hole Imager was to develop a constellation of precisely aligned spacecraft to collect X-rays emitted from the edges of those black holes. Keith Gendreau, an astrophysicist at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Maryland, thought of developing X-ray emitters that these spacecraft could use as navigational beacons to make sure they stayed in position relative to one another. The system would keep them aligned down to a precision of just 1 micron, or about one-hundredth the average width of a human hair. Gendreau then reasoned that by modulating or varying the strength or frequency of these X-ray transmissions on and off many times per second, these navigational beacons could also serve as a communication system. Such X-ray communication, or XCOM, might, in theory, permit gigabit-per-second data rates throughout the solar system, he said. One advantage that XCOM has compared to laser communication in deep space is that X-rays have shorter wavelengths than the visible or infrared light typically used in laser communication. Moreover, X-rays can penetrate obstacles that impede radio communication.

Submission + - Study: microbiome changes drive the dieting yo-yo effect

wheelbarrio writes: We've known for a long time that diet-induced weight loss is rarely permanent but until now what has been a frustration for dieters has also been largely a mystery to science. A paper published today in the prestigious journal Nature presents good evidence that your gut microbiome may be to blame. Studying mice fed cycles of high-fat and normal diets, the authors find that the particular bacterial population that thrives in the high-fat regime persists in the gut even once the mice have returned to normal weight and normal metabolic function after a dieting cycle. This leaves them more susceptible to weight gain than control mice who were never overweight, when both populations are exposed to a cycle of high-fat diet. The details are fascinating, including the suggestion that dietary flavonoid supplementation might mitigate the effect. My guess is that this may end up being one of the most cited papers of the year, if not the decade.

Submission + - Morgan Stanley: Pixel Phone Will Generate Google Almost $4 Billion Next Year (9to5google.com)

An anonymous reader writes: With initial Pixel pre-orders exceeding expectations and promising activation numbers from Verizon, Google is on track to sell three million phones with revenues of $2 billion in 2016. The Morgan Stanley estimate comes as the Pixel reportedly captured 10% of the premium smartphone market in India. Unsurprisingly, the 128GB Pixel XL has the largest gross profit margin at 25%, while the cheapest 32GB Pixel is at 22%. Morgan Stanley also estimates that, compared to the iPhone, the Pixel will be half as profitable. Morgan Stanley expects Google to sell 5-6 million Pixel and Pixel XL devices in 2017 to the tune of $3.8 billion in revenue. Google is also expected to make money from increased usage of services like Android Pay and mobile search. Google’s big gains were possibly due in part to Samsung’s Note 7 debacle, with the company’s marketshare falling to 23%. Apple captured the number one position at 66%. Additionally, Google benefitted from running a number of promotions, including cashback and exchange programs. The company also heavily advertised in newspapers, with billboards, and for the first time displays in large retail stores.

Submission + - China passes law requiring full access to customer data (deepdotweb.com) 1

AnonymousCube writes: As if there wasn't enough reason to want tech companies to stay out of China, the Chinese government has passed a new cybersecurity law requiring companies to give them full access to customer information.

Companies are also required to give government investigators complete access to their data if there is suspected wrong-doing, and Internet operators must cooperate in any national security or crime-related investigation.

Note that China has an extremely flexible definition of "national security".
Additionally computer equipment will need to undergo mandatory certification, that could involve giving up source code, encryption keys, or even proprietary intellectual data, as Microsoft has been doing for some time.

Submission + - EU's Law Enforcement Agency Closes 4,500 Websites Peddling Fake Brands (phys.org)

An anonymous reader writes: In a massive crackdown, police and law enforcement agencies across Europe have seized more than 4,500 website domains trading in counterfeit goods, often via social networks, officials said on Monday. The operation came as Europol, Europe's police agency, unveiled its newest campaign dubbed "Don't F***(AKE) Up" to stop scam websites selling fake brand names online. In the crackdown, agencies from 27 countries mostly in Europe but including from the US and Canada, joined forces to shut down over 4,500 websites. They were selling everything from "luxury goods, sportswear, spare parts, electronics, pharmaceuticals, toiletries and other fake products," Europol said in a statement, without saying how long the crackdown took. An annual operation run in collaboration with the US Immigration and Customs Enforcement and Homeland Security, there was "a significant increase in the number of seized domain names compared to last year," said Europol director Rob Wainwright. As part of the crackdown, Dutch anti-fraud police arrested 12 people across The Netherlands over the past two weeks as they searched homes and warehouses. Most of the raids were prompted by online sales of counterfeit goods on social networking sites such as Facebook and Instagram. More than 3,500 items of clothing and fake luxury goods were seized in Holland, including shoes, bags and perfumes purporting to be such brands as Nike, Adidas, and Kenzo, with a market value of tens of thousands euros. Publishing a guide on how to spot fake websites and social media scams, Europol warned consumers had to be on their guard.

Submission + - EPA Increases Amount of Renewable Fuel To Be Blended Into Gasoline (arstechnica.com)

An anonymous reader writes: Last week the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) announced its final renewable fuel standards for 2017, requiring that fuel suppliers blend an additional 1.2 billion gallons of renewable fuel into U.S. gas and diesel from 2016 levels. The rule breaks down the requirements to include quotas for cellulosic biofuels, biomass-based diesel, advanced biofuel, and traditional renewable fuel. Reuters points out that the aggressive new biofuel standards will create a dilemma for an incoming Trump administration, given that his campaign courted both the gas and corn industries. While the EPA under the Obama administration has continually increased so-called renewable fuel standards (RFS), the standards were first adopted by a majority-Republican Congress in 2005 and then bolstered in 2007 with a requirement to incorporate 36 billion gallons of renewable fuel into the fuel supply by 2022, barring “a determination that implementation of the program is causing severe economic or environmental harm,” as the EPA writes. Some biofuels are controversial not just for oil and gas suppliers but for some wildlife advocates as well. Collin O'Mara, CEO of the National Wildlife Federation, said in a statement that the corn ethanol industry that most stands to benefit from the EPA’s expansion of the renewable fuel standards “is responsible for the destruction of millions of acres of wildlife habitat and degradation of water quality.” Still, the EPA contends that biofuels made from corn and other regenerating plants offer reductions in overall fuel emissions, if the processes used to make and transport the fuels are included. “Advanced biofuels” will offer “50 percent lifecycle carbon emissions reductions,” and their share of the new standards will grow by 700 million gallons in 2017 from 2016 requirements, the EPA says. Cellulosic biofuel will be increased by 81 million gallons and biomass-based diesel will be increased by 100 million gallons. “Non-advanced or ‘conventional’ renewable fuel” will be increased to 19.28 billion gallons from 18.11 billion gallons in 2016. Conventional renewable fuel “typically refers to ethanol derived from corn starch and must meet a 20 percent lifecycle GHG [greenhouse gas] reduction threshold,” according to EPA guidelines. Other kinds of renewable fuels include sugarcane-based ethanol, cellulosic ethanol derived from the stalks, leaves, and cobs leftover from a corn harvest, and compressed natural gas gleaned from wastewater facilities.

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