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Slashback

Slashback: :CueCat, Exercise, Wormage 381

Slashback tonight brings you updates on the current doings (and name) of J. Jovan Philyaw, the man behind the :CueCat, the alleged worldwide infestation of file-trading computers with an RIAA-sponsored worm (not true, they say), the privacy implications of GeoURL markup, and more. Read on for the details.

When pranksters float your trial balloons for you. ninenet writes "A follow-up on the story posted earlier on Slashdot ... The RIAA has now officially stated that the claims of an elaborate P2P worm are 'a complete hoax.' A story on eWeek quotes an RIAA spokesman as saying, "Someone forwarded the message to us and that was the first we heard or read about it.""

<Location>,<location>,<location > A few days ago, we mentioned the interesting geographic lookup / markup system of GeoURL. Joshua Schachter, the fellow who runs GeoURL (and editor of memepool, to boot), writes with "some responses of mine to comments posted:

Q: "Why not use the WHOIS database for address information?"

A: GeoURL is geographic content markup. Nobody cares where your server is - where are YOU? That said, I'm waiting for someone to hook their GPS into their web page and keep GeoURL updated.

This way different URLs can have different coordinates, as well.

Q: "Blah blah blah blah privacy."

A: If you want privacy, don't put your location on your web page.

Q: "You're evil and you're going to steal this information and go private, just like CDDB did."

A: The content is marked up on the pages and not entered into my database. Anyone could easily write a similar service (and I hope they do.)

I plan to create a page containing lessons learned and useful code snippets for other people who would like to implement similar stuff."

Most importantly, I hope this helps the development of distributed speed-trap logging and mapping!

Making this up would be too easy. An anonymous reader writes "Egomaniacal former Dot.Bomb 'entrepreneur' J. Jovan Philyaw has escaped the asylum and is back with even bigger delusions of grandeur. When last we saw him, J.J. was trying to shove the misbegotten :CueCat/:CRQ combination on unsuspecting users. Now, he's apparently writing a couple of books, selling his 'power crystals' that adorned the offices of Digital:Convergence, and changing his name: his sites refer to him now as J. Hutton Pulitzer. Apparently the utter and complete failure of Digital:Convergence (loss of at least $185M) hasn't dented his ego one bit. In his bio, he actually compares himself to Thomas Edison. A hilarious must-read for those who followed the :CueCat debacle (and for those of us who worked there)."

I hope all these things can be adapted for recumbents. Jamie Briant writes: "Saw your update to the slashdot story on games for exercise bikes. I'm a developer for exertris.com that makes a bike with LCD screen built in, which we sell primarily to gyms, but you can buy in the UK at Harrods. We write and tune the games specifically to motivate you to exercise."

This discussion has been archived. No new comments can be posted.

Slashback: :CueCat, Exercise, Wormage

Comments Filter:
  • haiku (Score:5, Funny)

    by bobtheprophet ( 587843 ) on Tuesday January 14, 2003 @08:03PM (#5084430) Journal
    So, no more lawsuits [slashdot.org]
    but instead there will be worms
    From bad to evil.
  • by reaper20 ( 23396 ) on Tuesday January 14, 2003 @08:04PM (#5084432) Homepage
    "Someone forwarded the message to us and that was the first we heard or read about it."

    "Thanks for the idea though!"
  • by Anonymous Coward on Tuesday January 14, 2003 @08:04PM (#5084436)
    Might be apt if you're not a fan of his (and many of us aren't). He did have a way of stealing ideas and claiming them as his own. He was just a really good marketer.
  • by rgarcia ( 319304 ) on Tuesday January 14, 2003 @08:05PM (#5084442)
    "J. Jovan Philyaw ... his sites refer to him now as J. Hutton Pulitzer.

    Might as well have changed it to Max Power ;)
    • by Smidge204 ( 605297 ) on Tuesday January 14, 2003 @08:20PM (#5084531) Journal
      If he could push the idea of the CueCat as far as it got, blow $185 mil and not lose any sleep over it... maybe he's thinking of becoming a lawyer for the RIAA!

      "Kids, as of this moment, Lionel Hutz no longer exists. Say hello to Miguel Sanchez!"

      Seriously, though. I've got a few of those CueCats. A father of a friend runs a soup kitchen, and I helped hack together a barcoded ID card system to keep track of who visited and how often. Cuecats were perfect because they were free and really easy to write software for!

      Still in service, as far as I know. :)
      =Smidge=
      • by SomeoneGotMyNick ( 200685 ) on Tuesday January 14, 2003 @08:38PM (#5084631) Journal
        I've got a few of those CueCats

        A few? I went into a Radio Shack recently and asked if they still had any cue cats left. I was working on a project idea. They came back with a box of about twenty of them with a requirement that if I want them, I have to take a box of about 30 special TV cables (another DC flop) with them or else it's no deal.

        So I loaded up the back seat with the stuff. Now after spaying a few for use on my home PCs, I still got the rest of them in my basement.

        hehe.... maybe I ought to hold on to them till they become popular on eBay :)
        • Too late:

          http://search.ebay.com/search/search.dll?cgiurl= ht tp%3A%2F%2Fcgi.ebay.com%2Fws%2F&krd=1&from=R8&MfcI SAPICommand=GetResult&ht=1&SortProperty=MetaEndSor t&query=cuecat

          I'm going to hold on to mine, just for the usability factor. I'm sure I'll find _something_ to do with it. Hell, now that Fritz Ganter has released: Batchelor [kraftvoll.at], I'll probably just end up using it to replace my non-existent girlfriend.

          Now if only it could cook... :)

      • by Idarubicin ( 579475 ) on Tuesday January 14, 2003 @09:21PM (#5084860) Journal
        A father of a friend runs a soup kitchen, and I helped hack together a barcoded ID card system to keep track of who visited and how often.

        Cool--it's like a library card for food!

        Actually, the first time I read the post, I missed the phrase "barcoded ID card"--I wondered whether you had to have someone hold the homeless folks down while you tattooed them with a barcode, or if you just slipped a tranquilizer into their soup.

    • by sessamoid ( 165542 ) on Tuesday January 14, 2003 @09:14PM (#5084826)
      Might as well have changed it to Max Power ;)

      Doesn't beat the guy I met yesterday who changed his name to "Big Daddy." No lie.

      • Doesn't beat the guy I met yesterday who changed his name to "Big Daddy." No lie.

        But nothing beats this guy [love22.com].
        Love-22 is a street performer in Key West, who legally changed his name, and prints up his own 22-dollar bills, which have been used (mostly at backwoods convenience stores and gas stations) for currency more than 500 times in the past 22 years.

        I met this guy once... Looooooooooopy!

        -T

      • by FuegoFuerte ( 247200 ) on Wednesday January 15, 2003 @08:01AM (#5086802)
        Ok... Big Daddy... big whoop...

        My own story: I work retail. So, one day this guy comes in and buys a few things. Pulls out his credit card to pay. I have him sign the slip, and when I look at the signature, it looks for all the world like a smiling mushroom. I do a double-take and ask for his ID. He shows me his driver's license, with the name "mushroom [last name redacted]" on it, and again, the smiling mushroom for the signature. I had no reason to do otherwise at that point, so I accepted it. Turned out it was legit... never came back bad, and he came in a couple more times in the following months. I was truly amazed.
  • by FurryFeet ( 562847 ) <joudanx@@@yahoo...com> on Tuesday January 14, 2003 @08:06PM (#5084444)
    the utter and complete failure of Digital:Convergence

    Now, how the heck do you say that? "Digital Colon Convergence"?
    Kinda makes you cringe. I wonder how many investors thought their money was going to some kind of medical equipment company ("Yeah, Jack, that Q-CAT is even better than normal CATs, it uses that internet thingy that is so hot right now").
  • by Foxxz ( 106642 ) on Tuesday January 14, 2003 @08:06PM (#5084449) Homepage
    "Someone forwarded the message to us and that was the first we heard or read about it."

    And of course in that message they opened in Outlook contained a virus that began to "infect" the "napster bombs" they send out which in turn infect illegally traded mp3s and infect 95% of a p2p network. The plot thickens...

    -Foxxz
  • paranoia (Score:2, Insightful)

    by dirvish ( 574948 )
    I am less paranoid than I imagine the average /.er is but I still don't want people to be able to just look at the code of my web pages to find out where I am. Of course they could just look in WHOIS and get pretty close.
    • Re:paranoia (Score:3, Informative)

      by m0rph3us0 ( 549631 )
      Grab a clue read about the technology and then don't put the GPS of your location into your webpage if you don't want people to know where you are. It's really simple
  • by Anonvmous Coward ( 589068 ) on Tuesday January 14, 2003 @08:07PM (#5084452)
    "I'm a developer for exertris.com that makes a bike with LCD screen built in, which we sell primarily to gyms, but you can buy in the UK at Harrods. We write and tune the games specifically to motivate you to exercise."

    Make it display porn! I'm not kidding! Imagine the effect this would have on our lives!

    "Wow, he's cute! He must view porn a lot."

    Hurry up, Diet Coke has utterly failed me.
  • the bio (Score:5, Interesting)

    by Twirlip of the Mists ( 615030 ) <twirlipofthemists@yahoo.com> on Tuesday January 14, 2003 @08:09PM (#5084470)
    Don't bother clicking, y'all. This bozo doesn't deserve the notoriety that a good Slashdotting would bring. Here's the funniest part, smart quotes endumbened but all typos left intact. Just look upon his works, ye mighty, and despair:
    Who Is J. Hutton Pulitzer?

    J. Hutton Pulitzer is one of the most prolific independent Inventors of modern times and of the new millennium. His obvious "Invention and Passion Gene" seems to date back to his Royal German Ancestry as early as 1492 in the development of what is now modern Germany. Known for being "ahead of his time" in vision, thought and product development. J. Hutton has created many "first". One notable being the first syndicated television program in the world to combine simultaneous broadcast via Television, Radio and the Internet. His highly rated, award winning and acclaimed program, Net Talk Live!, which broadcast a record 245 original episodes, created a network of over 700 TV stations (ABC, NBC, FOX, CBS, WB and many Independent stations) and 200 radio stations-- Coast To Coast! In a format that is now copied by all the major networks, J. Hutton's show was broadcast to over 1.5 million TV homes worldwide on cable and broadcast television. His creation paved the way to the integration of various broadcast mediums around one syndicated theme. A sought after public speaker and industry trade writer, J. Hutton Pulitzer has presented his teachings to audiences as large as 45,000 and he has been guest lecturer and featured speaker/panelist at such prestigious educational institutions as Harvard Business School, Stanford University, The Cato Institute, University of Michigan, University of Texas, The C.E.O.'s Roundtable and corporations such as American Airlines, Radio Shack, Microsoft, NBC, Merrill Lynch, Bear Stearns and many others.
    I weep for the Republic.
    • by xeno ( 2667 ) on Tuesday January 14, 2003 @08:32PM (#5084600)
      Shame on you; how can you call him a bozo? Judging by his many "achievements," Mr. Pulitzer deserves the "respect" of the technical and "business" communities alike. His many "inventions" and "first" (such as the supraliminal barcode) have clearly been to the benefit of all humankind. And who could question the genius of a man who has leveraged his "obvious" "Invention and Passion Gene" to record 245 episodes of a show with an ! in the name.

      Royal German Ancestry meine Hinterteile.

      -J
    • Re:the bio (Score:2, Funny)

      by Otter ( 3800 )
      Hey, if you're going to quote and tell people not to read, you've got to include:
      His inventions have won numerous industry awards and accolades, chiefly due to the fact that J. Hutton Pulitzer's inventions and ideas were adopted by the American consumer at a rate that outpaced the combined first year growth of cell phones, pagers, personal computers, hand held computers and total Internet users in just the first 90 days of its heralded release.

      And here I thought all the whackjobs were Tesla fans. (Tesla the inventor, I mean, not the Canadian hair metal band.)

      • Yeah, I saw that, too. I'd like to know who considers giving the damn things away to everybody who subscribes to Wired and-- what was the other one? Fortune? Popular Science? Something or other.

        Shit, dude, if I give away my inventions, can I achieve "unprecedented market saturation" too?
    • Re:the bio (Score:2, Funny)

      by psamuels ( 64397 )
      Here's the funniest part, smart quotes endumbened but all typos left intact.

      "Endumbened". I'll have to remember that one. The correct term, I believe, is "demoronised [fourmilab.ch] - but I like yours too.

      Just look upon his works, ye mighty, and despair:

      Heh. There's definitely something pompous about using a first initial and middle name. Particularly if the first initial is J. Odd.

      I wonder if J in this case is short for Jabba the.

    • Re:the bio (Score:2, Insightful)

      by erc ( 38443 )
      J. who? Did you notice that nowhere on the site does it list *anything* he's done, just lists of "awards" and such. Awards for what? If I had invented the internet or any such thing, I'd be hollering about it to high heaven on my web site ... oh, wait a minute, Al Gore already beat me to it!

      Smells like BS to me...
    • Re:the bio (Score:2, Interesting)

      by Zeinfeld ( 263942 )
      J. Hutton Pulitzer is one of the most prolific independent Inventors of modern times and of the new millennium. His obvious "Invention and Passion Gene" seems to date back to his Royal German Ancestry as early as 1492

      Hey, my ancestry goes back to 1942, on both sides of my family. So for that matter does anyone's the only difference is whether you know who it was or not. 1492 is not all that far back either, my ancestors fought at the battle of Hastings (both sides) in 1066 but there are folk whose pedigrees go back to whatever date you argue for the Yellow Emperor of China.

      Of course it is all bollocks since genealogy tends to follow the male line and in practice it is only the female line whose accuracy can be assured. Adultery is not a modern invention, no matter who you are between 5% and 10% of your ancestors were bastards. If the gap between generations is 25 years that makes 20 generations since 1492, meaning that Pulitzer's chance of being legitimately descended from the royal family at no better than 35% with 12% being a more likely value.

      speaker/panelist at such prestigious educational institutions as Harvard Business School, Stanford University, The Cato Institute, University of Michigan, University of Texas,

      You have got to be pretty desperate if you end up putting the Cato Institute down on your speaking resume. Bit insensitive to put crank tank financed by rich rightwing crackpots to promote partisan views ahead of Michigan and Texas Universities though.

  • on excercising games (Score:5, Interesting)

    by lingqi ( 577227 ) on Tuesday January 14, 2003 @08:13PM (#5084491) Journal
    So... besides the tried and true DanceDanceRevolution (and all its spinoffs - the korean versions seems the hardest so far), there are many others nowadays. (and have been)

    For those who complains that there is insufficient stuff for your hands to do because "nobody dances like that", there is also ParaParaParadise or somesuch that focuses on the hands. If you follow *exactly* what the person do onscreen, it actually gets pretty fancy.

    Moreover, in Japan I have seen some boxing games where you would put on a pair of gloves and hit targets as they come up; at least one of them is themed after "Fist of the Northern Star." Also gives you quite a cardiovascular workout after a while.

    Then we have the horse-riding ones... While looking silly, those gets tiring!

    Another "all the rage" game is a drumming one. The Playstation version is not so tiring, but in the arcade with big drums and relatively heavy sticks, they can get interesting mighty quick (since for fast tracks you have to accelerate a fairly massy stick to the drum at high frequency).

    In ESPN-zone in downtown Chicago, there is also a rock-climbing thingy. Nobody can afford one on their own, but that's probably the most physically engaging "game" I have ever played.

    so... no reason to stick just to the bikes, y'all.
    • I play DDR some (my brother has it), and I can say, it's not "tried and true." It requires way too much coordination for me to be much interested in it, and for people looking for something to get them started on an exercise program, well, the more overweight you are, the more uncomfortable "Have You Never Been Mello" becomes after your third round.

      I don't mind anaerobic exercise, which is what you get if you do something for an extended duration, like jog, or ride a bike.

      I like the concept of immersing a game into a bike. I'm thinking about putting rotary encoders on my bike's handlebars and pedals, and mounting it to a frame. I should be able to rig up some box that translates the signals into something the Linux kernel joystick drivers can use. Maybe I can set up Need For Speed III under Wine. :P As long as I'm not thinking about the exercise portion, I'd absolutely love it.
    • by Elwood P Dowd ( 16933 ) <judgmentalist@gmail.com> on Tuesday January 14, 2003 @08:52PM (#5084714) Journal
      Just so you know what's in the US too, I recently went to our local Scandia (crappy arcade franchise).

      They've got some super-ultra-whatever DanceDanceRevolution. Dunno where it's from. I don't speak furrin.

      They've got ParaParaParadise

      They've got some boxing game (not Fist of the Northern Star. I wish.)

      No drumming.

      And like ten different (lame) alternative-input device games. I guess arcades realized that the only way to make someone pay $1 for a game was to make it something that you couldn't do on your PS2 - which has to be more than just a bigger CPU now... so *everything* is six feet wide, features a chair, and makes you look like a dumbass.

      There was some river rafting game where the whole point was to paddle as fast as possible to avoid some whirlpool... then steer to the next whirlpool. Fun to watch fat kids sweat.

      There was some motion-capture golf game. No stick. You swing your hands as if you were holding a golf club. Seems like that'd be impossible without tactile feedback.

      My favorite will always be the shooters. I try to get my exercise... uh... with my girlfriend.
    • This [mechanicalbullguy.com] does not look like much of a work out. Looks more like a nightmare where you fall off the bed.


    • Don't forget Boong-Ga Boong-Ga (spank 'em) [highwaygames.com], the Japanese spanking-themed video game.

    • by Cutriss ( 262920 ) on Tuesday January 14, 2003 @10:04PM (#5085033) Homepage
      The boxing game you speak of is called Mo-Cap Boxing, and it's produced by Konami, the same company that brings us Dance Dance Revolution, Para Para Paradise, DrumMania and Percussion Freaks (the drumming game you mention), and a wide variety of other motion-sensor and music-based games. Their Bemani division produces all of these (except for Police 911 and Mo-Cap Boxing).

      The Korean knock-off is called Pump It Up, and it's produced by Andamiro [andamiro.co.kr]. It is more difficult, but in my opinion it's not as fun as DDR. The song selection isn't very good. Another Korean knock-off, Techno Motion [f2.co.kr], basically builds off the Andamiro formula, which says "More arrows *must* mean more fun!" There's also Stepping Selection [ign.com], by Jaleco, which is the system that is the basis for Britney's Dance Beat [ign.com]. That's a pretty loathsome game there.

      Para Para Paradise, for the uninformed, uses five vertically positioned infrared beams placed in a pentagon shape around you. Similarly to DDR, you follow the arrows on the screen and break the light beams at the appropriate time. You don't have to use your feet, unlike DDR - Any body part will do. The orientation of the arrows makes it so that you have to rotate and twist more often, frequently making upper-body motions more efficient and viable. It's named Para Para Paradise because the motions you perform in the game are similar to a type of Japanese karaoke bar dancing called "parapara".

      For a good combination of both DDR and Para Para Paradise, try DanceManiax/Dance Freaks [konami.co.jp]. These games have sensors on the front of the machine which you can place your hands/arms/knees/whatever over or under, and foot panels on the bottom similar to DDR.

      Bemani makes a lot of other good stuff too (Like Beatmania!), but it's not exercise-oriented, and so I won't mention it here. For anyone interested in Bemani products, take a look at BemaniStyle.com [bemanistyle.com] and DDRFreak [ddrfreak.com].
  • by Goldberg's Pants ( 139800 ) on Tuesday January 14, 2003 @08:13PM (#5084493) Journal
    I went to a site that had that running and it told me where I was. Except it was HUGELY wrong. It told me I live somewhere that's a good 5 hour drive (and that's at illegal speeds) from where I am.
    • Since when is 500 miles "hugely wrong?" That's only a couple of decimal places from GPS resolution, you know. I'd be pretty impressed with an accuracy of within 500 miles.

      I would also be scared, and feel an irrational urge to move 1,000 miles away.
    • I went to a site that had that running and it told me where I was.

      Then, uh, you didn't see GeoURL in action at all.

      You saw, I assume, some sort of IP-to-geographic-location reverse lookup tool, which is a different thing completely.

      GeoURL doesn't tell YOU where you are; you tell IT. You put META tags in your web page with your geographic coordinates. It crawls the page, finds them, and adds you to the database. You can be as accurate or as inaccurate as you wish.

      For those concerned about privacy: well, why would you add the coordinates to your publicly accessible web page if you didn't want people to know them? Only possible answer: you are stupid. If you don't add the coordinates, GeoURL will have no idea where you are and, in fact, won't care. Where's the issue?

    • GeoURL doesn't tell you where YOU are. It tells you where other people are.
  • GEOUrl (Score:5, Interesting)

    by zangdesign ( 462534 ) on Tuesday January 14, 2003 @08:26PM (#5084564) Journal
    For all you paranoid types out there, this GEOUrl thing is remarkably easy to defeat

    1. don't participate - it ain't mandatory, so you have no reason to bitch.
    2. lie - hell, it could even help. make it look like you live someplace glamorous rather than in the basement of your parent's house in Poughkeepsie.

    I fail to see a problem here.
  • excercise (Score:3, Funny)

    by BinaryGrind ( 636049 ) <phate&binarygrind,com> on Tuesday January 14, 2003 @08:35PM (#5084610) Homepage Journal
    "We write and tune the games specifically to motivate you to exercise." what ever happend to the whip?
  • So how exactly do we know that Philyaw is Pulitzer? Nothing I saw jumped out at me as a firm connection. Same with the crystals; where is the connection? They could be for sale by GW for all we know.

    The Pulitzer site [jhuttonpulitzer.com] claims the company has been around since 1988. And the story was posted by an AC. Hmmm. I smell bullshit. Problem is I can't tell where the smell is coming from. Anyone else?

    • by Anonymous Coward on Tuesday January 14, 2003 @09:10PM (#5084805)
      From the Digital:Convergence [digitalconvergence.com] website:
      Prior to founding Digital:Convergence, Jovan was host and executive producer of "
      Net Talk Live!," an international radio and television show broadcast live over the Internet. Begun in 1995 under Jovan's guidance, the show now reaches an audience of millions around the world.
      From the J. Hutton [jhuttonpulitzer.com] website:
      J. Hutton has created many "first". One notable being the first syndicated television program in the world to combine simultaneous broadcast via Television, Radio and the Internet. His highly rated, award winning and acclaimed program,
      Net Talk Live!, which broadcast a record 245 original episodes, created a network of over 700 TV stations
  • by Anonymous Coward on Tuesday January 14, 2003 @08:43PM (#5084664)
    According to Mr. Philyaw's (Pulitzer? Maybe Einstein next?) bio he has 100 patents in his name. Not according to the USPTO. According to them he has 3 or 4.

    What a loser.
  • I can just imagine all those teenybopper crackers out there who won't get or won't believe the RIAA's denial, deciding they've been issued a challenge by authority and therefore the RIAA's affiliates are fair game. RIAA's denial should be stronger but then since the RIAA's been seeking go-ahead to crack into users' computers [wired.com] it makes it rather difficult for them to deny they've thrown down the gauntlet to the pubescents.
  • "The outlandish claims are part of a "security advisory" supposedly written by a group called Gobbles Security. However, the message bears little resemblance to the group's other advisories and also seems to make fun of Gobbles' habit of posting vulnerability information and exploits without notifying affected vendors in advance."
    Eh, I don't know what they're reading, but just about every previous Gobbles advisory looks like that. The trademark Theo bashing, poor grammar, and other things. Most likely false, but most likely them.
  • by Zapdos ( 70654 ) on Tuesday January 14, 2003 @09:07PM (#5084792)
    I wonder if Jovan would electrocute an elephant the way Thomas Edison did in order to show how superior DC is over AC.

  • Hutton Pulitzer's inventions and ideas were adopted by the American consumer at a rate that outpaced the combined first year growth of cell phones, pagers, personal computers, hand held computers and total Internet users in just the first 90 days of its heralded release.

    Wow, that sure is something. The free Cuecat alledgedly outpaced a bunch of things that cost alot of money.

    I doubt it's true anyhow.
  • by Anonymous Coward
    The dream was to connect items in the physical world to the Internet,

    It's come true, it's come true!

    The CueCat wasn't great as a barcode reader, but my girlfriend finds it very pleasurable. Sometimes, we even plug it into the Internet (of course, using an AntiVirus program--you never know).

  • Based on whois, Digital Convergence and museumcrystals.com share the same address. Museumcrystals is registered to JJ Philyaw.

    JJ Phylaw's email address is emailjovan@yahoo.com.

    The email for JH Pulitzer is also emailjovan@yahoo.com!

    Here are the whois records:

    Registrant:
    DIGITALCONVERGENCE, INC (DIGITALCONVERGENCE4-DOM)
    9101 N CENTRAL EXPY STE 600
    DALLAS, TX 75231-5926
    US

    Domain Name: DIGITALCONVERGENCE.COM

    Administrative Contact:
    Mathews, Dave (DM205) dmathews@HOTMAIL.COM
    DaveMathews.com
    213 Missing Way
    Dallas, TX 75222
    530-684-9988 (FAX) 530-579-7759
    Technical Contact:
    Network Operations (NO59-ORG) dmathews@HOTMAIL.COM
    DigitalConvergence
    9101 N Central EXPY STE 600
    Dallas, TX 75231
    USA
    530-684-9988
    Fax- 530-579-7759

    Domain Name.......... museumcrystals.com
    Creation Date........ 2002-02-07
    Registration Date.... 2002-02-07
    Expiry Date.......... 2003-02-07
    Organisation Name.... J. Jovan Philyaw
    Organisation Address. 9101 N. Central Expy 6th Floor
    Organisation Address.
    Organisation Address. Dallas
    Organisation Address. 75231
    Organisation Address. TX
    Organisation Address. UNITED STATES

    Admin Name........... J. Jovan Philyaw
    Admin Address........ 9101 N. Central Expy 6th Floor
    Admin Address........
    Admin Address........ Dallas
    Admin Address........ 75231
    Admin Address........ TX
    Admin Address........ UNITED STATES
    Admin Email.......... emailjovan@yahoo.com
    Admin Phone.......... 214-292-6000
    Admin Fax............

    Registrant:
    J. Hutton Pulitzer (JYDPHRZAUD)
    5001 Spring Valley Road, 400E
    Dallas, TX 75244-3910
    US

    Domain Name: JHUTTONPULITZER.COM

    Administrative Contact:
    J. Hutton Pulitzer (CWGSDZSMJO) emailjovan@yahoo.com
    J. Hutton Pulitzer
    5001 Spring Valley Road, 400E
    Dallas, TX 75244-3910
    US
    972.383.1344 fax: 123 123 1234
  • If this [jhuttonpulitzer.com] is the book he's writing...kinda makes you wonder what he actually intended for that hand-held CueCat device...
  • A hilarious must-read for those who followed the :CueCat debacle (and for those of us who worked there)."

    The people--from the CEOs to the Unix sysadmins--who worked for dot-coms with phony business plans should ALL take responsibility for the current sorry state of the economy.

  • This comment has nothing to do with the current Slashback articles, but it fits in this forum.. I didn't have a chance to submit it before school this morning.. I don't know if it was worthy enough to make it into Slashback anyway..

    I wrote to the I-Tee case manufacturer [lope.com.tw] the other day after reading this article [slashdot.org] on Slashdot..

    A few of the article's commentors mentioned that they hadn't received a response from them after emailing them themselves for prices, distribution, etc.. I guess I got lucky..

    Here's there response:

    Dear Mr. J. Johansen (I'm not Mr. DeCSS),

    Thank you for your e-mail.
    At present we don't have distributor in USA.
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    Anyone have $25,150+ lying around?
  • Ok, fair enough, I didn't buy it either, but has anyone tested the exploit posted to BUGTRAQ this morning for mpg123? Aren't there also known exploits for Winamp?

    The claims were certainly possible... but not quite plausible.

  • by gpinzone ( 531794 ) on Tuesday January 14, 2003 @10:12PM (#5085078) Homepage Journal
    Author: Garth
    Date: 1/14/2003 6:42 pm CST

    Dear Mr. Pulitzer/Philyaw,
    Being interested in patents in general, I took notice in your bio the fact that you have 100 patents. I went and looked them up and found that according to the USPTO you have what looks like 3 or 4 (didn't bother looking through each one). You might want to point out this oversight to them. It's quite irresponsible of them to lose track of 96 patents.

    Or perhaps you filed for them somewhere else, maybe Turkey?

    Garth
  • Of course the RIAA would deny it!

    I'm off to put tinfoil hats on my mp3 collection.

    Seriously, though, if I'm the RIAA, I no comment this one - just for the sheer fun of it.

  • I keep expecting this Philyaw/Pulitzer jerk to go off and start his own wacky cult religion that's simultaneously very stylish amongst Hollywood types and very expensive to participate in. 'Cause his grandiose inflated claims sound a lot like Elron's.
  • by virtigex ( 323685 ) on Tuesday January 14, 2003 @10:32PM (#5085180)
    The Pro Club in Redmond had a pretty good implementation of an exercise bike linked to one of several "virtual worlds". It was made by Cybex and had a first person (or overhead) display. The worlds were a tropical island, snow scape and an arena with a ball game. Resistance varied depending if you were going up or down hill (or underwater) and there were challenges in the form of races (against AI or linked units) as well as matches for the arena. The arena game had a ball that stuck to the front of your bike and could be fired off with a button into the goal.

    It was pretty absorbing and one could get quite a workout without realizing it. Playing against the AI was tough, since it never got fatigued.

    The games demoed on the Exertris are all 2d and (strangely) oriented left-to-right. Strange, since according to their web site Bill Gates was showcasing them at CES. Obviously he hadn't turned up at his local gym to do some research.

  • Oh great.. now you tell us.. after i deleted all my mp3's!
  • I wish I had remembered this earlier; I would have posted it then. About a year and a half ago, the Dallas Observer (one of those "let's all pretend we're not owned by a giant soulless corporation" alternative weeklys) posted a positively high-larious article about Digital Convergence, the Belo Corporation, and our friend Mr. Philyaw... er, Mr. Pulitzer. Mr. Whatever Person.

    It's short, funny, and worth a read [dallasobserver.com]. And it mentions uses a Simpsons reference to advance the story, so it's got to be cool.

    Because this article will be off the front page soon, meaning nobody is going to see it, I'll post this little tidbit in my journal as well. That way the Teeming Horde (i.e., my fans) will get a chance to read and laugh and live and love!

Nothing ever becomes real until it is experienced. - John Keats

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