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Submission + - Mozilla to Remove Hello in Firefox 49 (softpedia.com)

An anonymous reader writes: An entry on Mozilla's issue tracker opened on July 17 reveals ongoing efforts from Mozilla engineers to remove the Hello system add-on from default Firefox installations starting with version 49, set for public release on September 13, 2016.

Mozilla added Hello to Firefox in version 34, released on December 1, 2014, and from the beginning, it was part of the browser's core code, but was moved in December 2015 into a separate add-on, one that came pre-installed with Firefox, making Hello its first ever system add-on.

Mozilla plans to remove Hello from the codebases of Firefox Beta 49, Firefox Developer Edition 50, and Firefox Nightly 51. Based on the currently available information, the deadline for the Hello code removal operations is for this Monday, August 1, after which the first Firefox builds with no Hello integration will be available for testing, and will ship out in the fall with the stable release.

Submission + - Is Windows 10 Still A Step Back? 6

BrendaEM writes: Many people are pleased with Windows 10, but to dig though the user interface is to see one that seem like it was never finished. In the simplified dumbed-down menus, there is not enough functionality for a user to maintain their computer. Clicking on "advanced" give you access to Windows 7-style menus, going deeper, you see menus that haven't been updated since Windows 2000.

Many people are still having hardware problems such as dealing with a crippled Bluetooth file transfer which can no longer automatically receive files, thereby making the user invoke every single transfer. Many others are having charging problems with Android phones.

Even Windows 7 needlessly made it difficult to use more than two power schemes, which many people who work their computer hard may want to use. Windows 7 made the computer management event logs terribly slow to sort on even a modern computer. Windows 7 also made it next to impossible to format a large FAT32 drive.

With poor privacy practices, a disrespect for the user as far as upgrades, recent unfair browser marking practices, a lack of UI vision, will another company ever dare make a competing commercial operating system for PC compatibles?

Submission + - DoJ uses obsolete software to subvert FOIA requests (theguardian.com)

Bruce66423 writes: An MIT PhD student has filed a suit in Federal court alleging that the use of a 21yo IBM green screen controlled search software to search the Department of Justice databases in response to Freedom of information requests constitutes an deliberate failure to provide the data that should be being produced

Submission + - Why Tech Support Is (Purposely) Unbearable

HughPickens.com writes: Getting caught in a tech support loop — waiting on hold, interacting with automated systems, talking to people reading from unhelpful scripts and then finding yourself on hold yet again — is a peculiar kind of aggravation that mental health experts say can provoke rage in even the most mild-mannered person. Now Kate Murphy writes at the NYT that just as you suspected, companies are aware of the torture they are putting you through as 92 percent of customer service managers say their agents could be more effective and 74 percent say their company procedures prevented agents from providing satisfactory experiences. “Don’t think companies haven’t studied how far they can take things in providing the minimal level of service,” says Justin Robbins, who was once a tech support agent himself and now oversees research and editorial at ICMI. “Some organizations have even monetized it by intentionally engineering it so you have to wait an hour at least to speak to someone in support, and while you are on hold, you’re hearing messages like, ‘If you’d like premium support, call this number and for a fee, we will get to you immediately.’”

Mental health experts say there are ways to get better tech support or maybe just make it more bearable. First, do whatever it takes to control your temper. Take a deep breath. Count to 10. Losing your stack at a consumer support agent is not going to get your problem resolved any faster and being negative in your dealings with others can quickly paint you as a complainer no one wants to work with. Don’t bother demanding to speak to a supervisor, either. You’re just going to get transferred to another agent who has been alerted ahead of time that you have come unhinged. To get better service by phone, dial the prompt designated for “sales” or “to place an order,” which almost always gets you an onshore agent, while tech support is usually offshore with the associated language difficulties. Finally customer support experts recommended using social media, like tweeting or sending a Facebook message, to contact a company instead of calling. You are likely to get a quicker response, not only because fewer people try that channel but also because your use of social media shows that you know how to vent your frustration to a wider audience if your needs are not met.

Submission + - UDS Releases Images. 250,000+ Galaxies Found in Deep Space. (wired.co.uk)

William Robinson writes: The UDS Project (Ultra Deep Survey), part of UKIRT Infrared Deep Sky Survey, have recently released the final data providing spectacular infrared images of the distant Universe have provided astronomers with the deepest view ever obtained. The UDS mapped a total area four times the size of full moon and detected over 250,000 galaxies, including several hundred observed within the first billion year after Big Bang. This was done since 2005 by observing the same patch of sky repeatedly, obtaining more than 1,000 hours of exposure time and utilizing the power of infrared to provide the deepest view ever obtained over a large area in the sky,

Submission + - Is It Ever OK to Quit on the Spot? 3

HughPickens.com writes: Employees and employers alike have the right under at-will employment laws in almost all states to end their relationship without notice, for any reason, but the two-week rule is a widely accepted standard of workplace conduct. Now Sue Shellenbarger writes at the WSJ that employers say a growing number of workers are leaving without giving two weeks’ notice. Some bosses blame young employees who feel frustrated by limited prospects or have little sense of attachment to their workplace. But employment experts say some older workers are quitting without notice as well. They feel overworked or unappreciated after years of laboring under pay cuts and expanded workloads imposed during the recession. One employee at Dupray, a customer-service rep, scheduled a meeting and announced she was quitting, then rose and headed for the exit. She seemed surprised when the director of human resources stopped her and explained that employees are expected to give two weeks’ notice. “She said, ‘I’ve been watching ‘Suits,’ and this is how it happens,’ ” referring to the TV drama set in a law firm.

According to Shellenbarger, quitting without notice is sometimes justified. Employees with access to proprietary information, such as those working in sales or new-product development, face a conflict of interest if they accept a job with a competitor. Employees in such cases typically depart right away—ideally, by mutual agreement. It can also be best to exit quickly if an employer is abusive, or if you suspect your employer is doing something illegal. More often, quitting without notice “is done in the heat of emotion, by someone who is completely frustrated, angry, offended or upset,” says David Lewis, president of OperationsInc., a Norwalk, Conn., human-resources consulting firm. That approach can burn bridges and generate bad references. Phyllis Hartman says employees have a responsibility to try to communicate about what’s wrong. “Start figuring out if there is anything you can do to fix it. The worst that can happen is that nobody listens or they tell you no."

Submission + - ARM Tapes Out Next-Gen 64-Bit Artemis Mobile Chip On 10nm TSMC FinFET Process (hothardware.com)

MojoKid writes: ARM has been working closely with TSMC for years now. Over the last six years or so especially, ARM and TSMC have collaborated to ensure that TSMC's cutting-edge process technologies work well with ARM's processor IP. However recently, ARM just announced the successful tape-out of a test chip featuring next-generation, 64-Bit ARM v8-A mobile processor cores, codenamed Artemis, manufactured using TSMC's upcoming 10nm FinFET process technology. The test chip features what ARM calls an Artemis cluster. It's essentially a quad-core processor with power management IP, a single-shader Mali graphics core, AMBA AXI interconnect, and test ROMs connected to a second cluster by an asynchronous bridge that features the memory subsystem, which is stacked with a Cortex M core that handles control logic, some timers, SRAM, and external IO. Compared to 16nm FinFET+, at nominal voltage, the 10nm test chip offered a 12% performance improvement in a similar power envelope. In super-overdrive mode (Vsod), the Artemis test chip offered similar performance, but at 30% lower power.SoCs for premium mobile devices with next-generation cores produced on the 10nm process node are expected to arrive later in the second half of this year.
Space

ESA Offering Prizes For First Radio Reception From Satellite (livejournal.com) 9

An anonymous reader writes: The European Space Agency education office set up a contest to receive the radio signals from their new Cubesat satellites: AAUSAT4, E-st@r-II or OUFTI-1. Prizes will be rewarded to those who receive the first signal (audio or waterfall) from TLM, packet or ham radio transponders. Even if you're not the first, any valid submission will be rewarded with a nice QSL card from ESA, reports one space site.

Arianespace's Soyuz is scheduled for liftoff on April 24 with a multi-mission satellite payload. Designated Flight VS14 in Arianespace's launcher family numbering system, the medium-lift Soyuz carries a mixed payload of the Sentinel-1B C-band radar observation platform, a trio of "Fly Your Satellite!" technology demonstrator CubeSats, and the Microscope scientific satellite.

Submission + - NASA's Cassini reveals the full glory of Saturn's rings

StartsWithABang writes: In the 1600s, the earliest telescopes saw that Saturn had "ears," while later observers all the way back then finally saw their true nature: a ringed system with complex gaps, bands and colorations throughout. Since then, Saturn’s rings have been a source of wonder and puzzlement to skywatchers everywhere. The only ring system visible through most telescopes from Earth, Saturn’s main rings measure more than 70,000 km long, yet are no more than 1 km in thickness. Once thought to have only two gaps in them, the Cassini spacecraft has revealed over a thousand, teaching us that Saturn’s rings are ancient — likely as old as the planet itself — and will likely continue to exist for as long as our Sun shines.

Comment 'Highest' is subjective (Score 1) 2

I also use Privacy Badger, and it only sees 5 here. And only one of those is trying to track. What sites do you visit that have more than 5? I visit plenty that can have dozens, depending on the site.

Submission + - Hackers Get Lazy, Build Trojan on Top of Android Rooting Utility (softpedia.com)

An anonymous reader writes: Instead of creating their own exploits, some lazy Chinese hackers took the Root Assistant Android rooting toolkit and remodeled it into a trojan, which they packed inside copies of legitimate apps (distributed via unofficial app stores). Until now, only seven apps were repackaged, and only 600 users infected. A weird thing: there's a XML file in the trojan that prevents it from infecting Chinese users.

Submission + - SPAM: Oct. 1st EMV Liability Shift - Opportunity For Retailers

dkatana writes: Americans have been receiving new credit and debit cards this year featuring a new shiny little chip, something Asians and Europeans had for years. It is called a EMV (Eurocard-MasterCard-Visa) chip that generates an unique code for each transaction, effectively making very difficult to clone the card.

But there is a catch: if the POS system at the business side is not equipped with a EMV terminal, then the transaction will occur as before, through magnetic swipe, with all the credit card information exposed.

That is where liability-shift comes in. If the business (restaurant, retailer, supermarket) has the EMV technology but the card has no chip, any fraudulent charge is the responsibility of the issuing bank or credit card company... The problem is that most small businesses do not know that.

Link to Original Source

Comment DNS replacement? (Score 2) 69

While I am not really learned in the ways of the blockchain and its possible uses (nefarious and otherwise), this sounds like a plausible idea. Anyone have details? Aren't blockchains several gigabytes each? We'd need to centralize it all over again, I'd think.....

Submission + - Intelligence Start-Up Goes Behind Enemy Lines to Get Ahead of Hackers (nytimes.com)

anlashok writes: iSight Partners looks to be another company to follow if interested in cybersecurity.
Quote "ISight’s investors, who have put $60 million into the company so far, believe that its services fill a critical gap in the battle to get ahead of threats. Most security companies, like FireEye, Symantec, Palo Alto Networks and Intel’s security unit, focus on blocking or detecting intrusions as they occur or responding to attacks after the fact.

ISight goes straight to the enemy. Its analysts — many of them fluent in Russian, Mandarin, Portuguese or 21 other languages — infiltrate the underground, where they watch criminals putting their schemes together and selling their tools."

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