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Submission + - Putin's Cyberattacks May Be to Aid Trump's Presidential Campaign

HughPickens.com writes: The NYT reports that the release on Friday of some 20,000 stolen emails from the Democratic National Committee’s computer servers, many of them embarrassing to Democratic leaders, has intensified discussion of the role of Russian intelligence agencies in disrupting the 2016 presidential campaign. The emails, released by WikiLeaks, exposed the degree to which the Democratic apparatus favored Hillary Clinton over her primary rival, Senator Bernie Sanders of Vermont, and triggered the resignation of Debbie Wasserman Schultz, the party chairwoman, on the eve of the convention’s first day.

Proving the source of a cyberattack is difficult but all the forensic evidence points toward Russian intelligence agencies as the perpetrators of the theft of the national committee emails, given the close similarities between this attack and previous Russian cyberoperations. It is less clear who gave the emails to WikiLeaks, but the same agencies are the prime suspects. Whether the leaks were ordered by Mr. Putin, or just designed by apparatchiks who thought it might please him, is anyone’s guess. On Sunday morning, the issue erupted, as Mrs. Clinton’s campaign manager, Robby Mook, argued on ABC’s “This Week” that the emails were leaked “by the Russians for the purpose of helping Donald Trump” citing “experts” but offering no other evidence. So why would Putin want to support Donald Trump for President? Mook suggests that the Russians might have good reason to support Trump because of Trump's views on NATO: The Republican nominee indicated in an interview with The New York Times that he might not back NATO nations if they came under attack from Russia — unless he was first convinced that the counties had made sufficient contributions to the Atlantic alliance.

Submission + - SPAM: MH370 Pilot Flew a Suicide Route on His Home Simulator Closely Matching Final Fl 1

schwit1 writes: Malaysia Airlines Flight 370 was likely steered into the sea intentionally, by its own captain, in a pre-planned mass murder-suicide, a new report reveals.

In an exclusive story posted online Friday, New York magazine says that the plane’s captain, Zaharie Ahmad Shah, “conducted a simulated flight deep into the remote southern Indian ocean less than a month before the plane vanished under uncannily similar circumstances.”

Link to Original Source

Submission + - SPAM: Physicists Combine Gold with Titanium And Quadruple Its Strength

schwit1 writes: When it comes to bone replacements, the go-to material is still titanium. Hard, wear-resistant, and compatible to the body, titanium looks like the best alternative to actual bone, maybe even better. Who knew that you could improve the ‘gold standard’ by just adding actual gold?

Rice University physicists have discovered that an alloy of titanium and gold is three to four times harder than steel, and may actually be better as a material for replacement body parts. The study, published in Science Advances , described the properties of an alloy of the two metals, a 3-to-1 mixture of titanium and gold, called Titanium-3. They found the alloy to be four times harder than titanium.

When they checked the biocompatibility and wear rate of the alloy, the researchers knew that it would rank high, since its parent metals are already biocompatible and used in medical implants. Surprisingly, Titanium-3 performed well over their expectations, actually being more biocompatible and wear resistant than pure titanium.

Gold-pressed latinum?

Link to Original Source

Submission + - EU to Give Free Security Audits to Apache HTTP Server and Keepass (softpedia.com) 1

An anonymous reader writes: The European Commission announced on Wednesday that its IT engineers would provide a free security audit for the Apache HTTP Server and KeePass projects. The two projects were selected following a public survey that included several open-source projects deemed important for both the EU agencies and the wide public.

The actual security audit will be carried out by employees of the IT departments at the European Commission and the European Parliament. This is only a test pilot program that's funded until the end of the year, but the EU said it would be looking for funding to continue it past its expiration date in December 2016.

Submission + - Sound waves used to boost intensity of light on a sili (gizmag.com)

Keys of Cars writes: Using a newly-developed waveguide, scientists at Yale have created a method to significantly increase the power of laser light on a silicon chip by boosting it with sound waves. The researchers believe that this new device could have practical uses in commercial technologies, including more efficient fiber-optic communications and better data signal processing. ..
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Submission + - North American city record of 46% wind power integration. (huffingtonpost.ca)

Socguy writes: The city of Summerside, Prince Edward Island, achieved the highest level of wind power integration in North America at 46%. It has achieved this remarkable feat through the creation and utilization of a smart grid that controls thermal storage in hot water heaters and furnaces within community homes.

Submission + - Solar Impulse off on the last leg (bbc.com)

AppleHoshi writes: The BBC is reporting that Solar Impulse, the all electric aeroplane making a circumnavigation of the globe, has left Cairo on the 17th and final leg of the epic journey. The Solar Impulse team estimates a 48-hour flight to the destination (and the staring point for the flight, last year), Abu Dhabi. All is not plain sailing, though. Despite the flight being mostly over desert where there's generally plenty of sunshine, the pilot, Bertrand Piccard, may have problems with the desert heat and the strong thermal updraughts which it creates.

Submission + - Can Iris-Scanning ID Systems Tell the Difference Between a Live and Dead Eye? (ieee.org)

the_newsbeagle writes: Iris scanning is increasingly being used for biometric identification because it’s fast, accurate, and relies on a body part that's protected and doesn’t change over time. You may have seen such systems at a border crossing recently or at a high-security facility, and the Indian government is currently collecting iris scans from all its 1.2 billion citizens to enroll them in a national ID system. But such scanners can sometimes be spoofed by a high-quality paper printout or an image stuck on a contact lens.

Now, new research has shown that post-mortem eyes can be used for biometric identification for hours or days after death, despite the decay that occurs. This means an eye could theoretically be plucked from someone's head and presented to an iris scanner.

The same researcher who conducted that post-mortem study is also looking for solutions, and is working on iris scanners that can detect the "liveness" of an eye. His best method so far relies on the unique way each person's pupil responds to a flash of light, although he notes some problems with this approach.

Submission + - "Indian Point' — Documentary On Problem-Plagued Nuclear Plants Is Out (huffingtonpost.com)

mdsolar writes: "Indian Point” is a film about the long problem-plagued Indian Point nuclear power plants that are “so, so risky — so close to New York City,” notes its director and producer Ivy Meeropol. “Times Square is 35 miles away.”

The plants constitute a disaster waiting to happen, threatening especially the lives of the 22 million people who live within 50 miles from them. “There is no way to evacuate—what I’ve learned about an evacuation plan is that there is none,” says Meeropol. The plants are “on two earthquake fault lines,” she notes. “And there is a natural gas pipeline right there that an earthquake could rupture.”

Meanwhile, both plants, located in Buchanan, New York along the Hudson River, are now essentially running without licenses. The federal government’s 40-year operating license for Indian Point 2 expired in 2013 and Indian Point 3’s license expired last year. Their owner, Entergy, is seeking to have them run for another 20 years—although nuclear plants were never seen as running for more than 40 years because of radioactivity embrittling metal parts and otherwise causing safety problems. (Indian Point 1 was opened in 1962 and closed in 1974, its emergency core cooling system deemed impossible to fix.)

Submission + - SPAM: Almost Half of All TSA Employees Have Been Cited for Misconduct

schwit1 writes: Almost half of all TSA employees have been cited for misconduct, and the citations have increased by almost 30 percent since 2013.

Of the total allegations filed, 90.8 percent were against TSA officers, while 4.8 percent were filed against managers or administrators. Of the areas of misconduct, “Attendance & Leave” sees the highest number of offenders, while “Failure to Follow Instructions,” “Screening & Security,” “Neglect of Duty,” and “Disruptive Behavior” round out the top five.

It also appears that the TSA has been reducing the sanctions it has been giving out for this bad behavior.

Submission + - Google tests ads that load faster and use less power (bbc.co.uk)

Big Hairy Ian writes: Google says it has found a way to make adverts load faster on web pages viewed on smartphones and tablets.
The company said the ads would also be less taxing on the handsets' processors, meaning their batteries should last longer.
The technique is based on work it has already done to make news publishers' articles load more quickly.
But it is still in development, and one expert said Google still had questions to answer.
The California-based company's online advertising revenue totalled $67.4bn (£51.2bn) last year.
That figure included banners and animations placed via the Google Display Network — which would be affected by this project — as well as other types of ads, such as search result links and YouTube pre-roll clips, which would not.

Submission + - Maximizing economic output with linear programming ... and communism (medium.com)

mkwan writes: Economies are just a collection of processes that convert raw materials and labour into useful goods and services. By representing these processes as a series of equations and solving a humongous linear programming problem, it should be possible to maximize an economy's GDP. The catch? The economy needs to go communist.

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