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Comment Re:Lies? (Score 1) 503

Where do you draw the line on being an engineer? Seems like a good topic for a discussion.

One that designs based on actual data and tolerances.

What the overwhelming majority of programmers do has nothing to do with engineering, and more to do with jerry building.

As someone that works under the title of software engineer, I agree with this, except with the jerry building part. There is jerry building and there is jerry building, one on actual data and tolerance, one done as a craft, and one where people throw shit at the wall and package whatever sticks.

If you apply the scientific method to your work, have clear tolerances and work on actual data, or data inferred by some type of model, then shit, a lot of software jerry building then also accounts as engineering (and there is lot of that.)

But it is also true a lot of what is done in software is not engineering, not even craft (but shit flinging.) The field of software is still too young to clearly define what is engineering and what is craft (and far more dynamic than most fields that have come before it.)

Comment Re:Hell, it's about time. (Score 1) 242

We will no longer surrender this country, or its people, to the false song of globalism.

Globalism works. Now if you are incapable to compete, then shit, you are out of luck, but whose fault is that? Specially in a versatile industry such as software and IT?

Obviously it can be done better, and many of the pains we see have nothing to do with globalism but with this country having

1) an inexcusable lack of basic social contracts,

2) millions of people (mostly males in their late 30's and 40's) who are, also inexcusable, illiterate (and I'm not talking about uneducated immigrants, but US born citizens),

3) entire regions that have been chronically and systematically poor since fucking forever, predating globalization,

4) a non-existent vocational education system for adults (specially for adults who lose their jobs and need to switch gears.)

The Japanese overtook America in car manufacturing in 1972, due to incompetence and complacency. That's 45 years ago. Coal has been bleeding jobs since the 1930's, more than 80 years ago. Steel has been bleeding jobs since it started recycling, decades ago.

People act as if globalism is a new phenomenon that wreck their innocent lives for no reason, and that they, unlike every other fucking human being in history, must be sheltered for competition, and their incompetence rewarded.

Lie yourself if you must with this bullshit.

User Journal

Journal Journal: cnn.com sucks 1

As of today and for the past few months, cnn.com sucks. They have so many scripting and click overlays or whatever generating ad content it takes up to 30 seconds to load on my fast home computer with good Internet connection.

Worse, it grinds Chrome almost to a halt. If I click the close box, it can take over 5 seconds to actually close that awful cnn.com tab. Other tabs are hindered.

Comment Re:The perfect name. (Score 1) 67

That's a good question. They have to make sure this isn't a print where a very large foot slid in mud (this may or may not be obvious to footprint specialists) and that it isn't the diseased or deformed foot of some 1-off, if very large, animal.

Looking at all the large sauropods so far, assuming from the drawings they have examples of how big their feet are, and thus are accurate, this could be freaking huge.

If you look at the biggest known dinosaurs, in the first picture overlaying some, the largest two are of dubious provenance, and their feet aren't even as big as this print.

Comment And might barely, barely won that one (Score 4, Insightful) 464

If a simple 50% majority was sufficient to join, then a 50% majority is sufficient to leave.

Neither should be the case as turning over so much power should be a supermajority decision of people in a nation (because if you can't convince most people that such a big change is a good idea, you have no business doing it.) But somehow people are trained to believe a simple majority is a godlike authority instead of an abstraction of might makes right, which it should be treated as.

Comment Re:Nothing new here (Score 1) 491

ISPs with at least 100,000 customers will have 12 months after rules are published in the Federal Register to comply with the customer notice and choice requirements, while ISPs with fewer than 100,000 customers will be given an extra 12 months. ISPs will have 90 days to comply with new data security requirements and six months to comply with new data breach notification requirements.

Oh look at that. It's questionable whether any had even implemented it yet.

Comment Re:Nothing new here (Score -1) 491

So you're saying Obama jammed in a regulation he knew they would have to repeal, right before he left office so he wouldn't have to deal with it, to get brownie points, and drooling cogs in the machine are dutifully acting as predicted in screaming how bad it is to go back to the 8 years Obama was fine with this?

I haven't seen anything this cynical since Clinton introduced ridiculously over-reaching anti-arsenic levels in water literally in December before he left office, so Bush would have to take the heat for reversing them.

Surprise! The cogs won that one and the nation had the honor of paying billions for pointless upgrades to the water system.

Comment Re:Thanks, I'll pass on all of them (Score 1) 251

I live in the mid-west, and until a recent job change, had a shorter commute than everything in that list - plus a 3 bed house for less than the vast majority of that list. My income is on par with national averages for my job title, yet I have a vastly below average cost of living.

For the life of me, I can't fathom why anyone would want to live in a big city. Every perk I hear touted, I can beat. It's quiet, I have a yard, and I have more spending money that the saps choking on smog.

Because the job pool is greater within a 45-minute commute ratio. When shit hits the fan (which always happens) it is best to have several dozen leads as opposed to just 3 or 4 at the most in the middle of nowhere. I've had colleagues that moved to charming, lower-cost towns to work with that one great employer. Then, shit, poof! Gig is gone and now have to commute 2-3 hours to the big city because they have a house, kids are in school and wife is working in that charming lower-cost town.

I've been in this rodeo for 25 years, and I've seen that played out so many times I know those incidents aren't a fluke. I rather deal with the nasty 45 minute suburban commute and the ridiculous prices to avoid dealing with that.

It's a matter of risk taking. I take risks, but I don't take those kind of risks (specially in a world when turn-over is almost certain every 4-6 years at best, and 2 years at worst.)

Comment Re:I'll buy one.... (Score 1) 78

Same here, but with the Note 3. Running CM13 @ 2.7ghz, with battery #3. No need to upgrade.

However, if any manufacturer does release a device with significantly better hardware, a replaceable battery, SD slot, and unlocked bootloader, I've got upwards of $1500 with their name on it. Doubt it'll be Samsung. :(

Comment Re:Seriously? (Score 1) 159

Ah, TA.

I remember my brother and I playing that game for so many nights, we got to the point where we'd race to a given objective. The most fun was building the automatic annihilator cannon (can't remember what it was called).

We finished within 4 seconds of each other, and must destruction was wrought.

Good times.

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