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Mozilla Camino 1.0 Released 91

Mini-Geek writes "MozillaZine is reporting that Mozilla Camino 1.0 has been released. The latest release includes a new tab bar appearance, pause and resume for downloads, improved advertisement and popup blocking, enhanced certificate support, bundled java embedding plugin, form fill from Address Book and inline search of history and bookmarks. See the Camino 1.0 Release Notes for more details."
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Mozilla Camino 1.0 Released

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  • http://www.caminobrowser.org/download/releases/1.0 / [caminobrowser.org]

    Will be cool to see how this stacks up against the latest Firefox - on OSX I've actually started using Safari more than FF - but maybe Camino will change that. Nice to have options.
    • on OSX I've actually started using Safari more than FF

      Same here. I use FireFox for development work, but Safari better meets my needs for general browsing. Personally, I had thought Camino was dead.

      Is it just me, or does this new Camino look an aweful lot like Safari without the brushed metal [kulenski.org] theme?
    • Re:Download link (Score:1, Informative)

      by snib ( 911978 )
      on OSX I've actually started using Safari more than FF - but maybe Camino will change that Just to make sure it's clear, Camino is not a build of Firefox. It is a separately managed project specifically designed for the Mac, but it uses the same rendering engine.
    • Will be cool to see how this stacks up against the latest Firefox
      Camino doesn't support Firefox plugins, ergo it doesn't support Adblock ergo I'll never use it.
      • Thanks for pointing this out.

        I was interested up until this point. Once you've used Adblock (or PithHelmet on Safari, a shareware tool that does effectively the same thing) you'll never, ever go back to a "stock" browser. Or at least, I never will. It's a "killer feature" if I've ever seen one.

        Somebody wake me up when they get a clue and build ad blocking into the browser like they should.
        • Re:Ad Blocking (Score:4, Informative)

          by Kadin2048 ( 468275 ) <slashdot.kadin@[ ]y.net ['xox' in gap]> on Wednesday February 15, 2006 @09:44AM (#14724121) Homepage Journal
          Well .... it looks like I may be trying Camino after all, it does have integrated ad blocking:

          From the Features [caminobrowser.org] page:
          Camino puts an end to annoying pop-up windows and advertisements, which makes surfing the internet a much more enjoyable experience. The built-in annoyance blocking technology stops distractions that get in between you and the information you're looking for.

          Most pop-ups are unwanted, but some sites make legitimate use of them. Camino displays an icon in the status bar whenever a pop-up is blocked, allowing users to unblock legitimate pop-ups with ease.
          I'm not entirely clear how it works, or whether the blocklist is updatable, but there is also a freeware add-on called CamiBlock [softpedia.com] which allows you to import a blocklist (so I suppose you could use Filterset.G?).
      • There's the free CamiOptions which includes amongst many other AdBlock which can even block Flash Movies. Now you have NO excuses ;-)
  • What it is... (Score:2, Informative)

    by ZipR ( 584654 )
    According to the site, it is a "Gecko based native Mac OS X browser." How is it different from Firefox?
    • Re:What it is... (Score:5, Informative)

      by sethadam1 ( 530629 ) <.moc.ebuttsrif. .ta. .mada.> on Tuesday February 14, 2006 @03:57PM (#14719137) Homepage
      For one, it doesn't include XUL, so it doesn't support extensions. However, the Cocoa integration is much better, so it looks and feels like a real Mac application. It's gorgeous, about as pretty as Firefox for OS X with Firefoxy widgets. It's fast. And in my experience, it doesn't bleed RAM like Firefox does.
      • It looks really fast, but I'm not sure if that's just an social trick or a real stat. There seems to be a half a beat pause after I first click a link (during the "contacting the website" phase), then the page almost instantly appears. In contrast, Safari begins rendering almost immediately, but takes half a beat to finish. I've seen this with both the BBC and CNN, with ESPN's dynamic content ADD-fest loading progressively but in the same basic manner (Safari starts first, both finish about the same).

        So I'
        • Camino uses Gecko. Safari uses Webkit [opendarwin.org], which is based on HTML. This is really not a question of browser as much as it is of the rendering engine behind it. Browsers like Flock and Shiira are based on Gecko and Webkit respectively, so you should expect similar results. Firefox, incidentally, is also based on Gecko.

          For what it's worth, many people I know describe Opera as being significantly faster than Gecko, WebKit, and MSHTML (the rendering engine behind IE).
        • Re:It is fast? (Score:3, Informative)

          by pavon ( 30274 )
          There seems to be a half a beat pause after I first click a link (during the "contacting the website" phase), then the page almost instantly appears. In contrast, Safari begins rendering almost immediately, but takes half a beat to finish.

          If you have a preference about how long the browser waits for data before it starts to render the data it already has, you can play with it in Camino (and Firefox) by typing about:config into the address window and editing "nglayout.initialpaint.delay". The value is in mil
      • It also handles concurrent operations better than Safari (and Firefox, IIRC). In Safari, if you open a new tabbed window, you must wait for that page to finish loading before you can switch to another tab. In Camino, you can flip between tabs regardless of their load state. This is useful when you open a very large page and want to. Camino just feels faster all around.
        • you must wait for that page to finish loading before you can switch to another tab

          WTF? This is complete bullshit, just for the sake of it I opened three tabs at the same time and I'm happly switching between them without any delay or waiting, even while the content in the tabs is loading. I don't know where you've got your info from, but it is plain wrong.
    • Re:What it is... (Score:5, Informative)

      by rebug ( 520669 ) on Tuesday February 14, 2006 @03:58PM (#14719140)
      Keychain integration, a native Cocoa ui, and Address Book support all make it a more "Mac-like" application than Firefox can ever be.
      • Unfortunately the keychain access doesn't extend to personal certificates, it still uses an underlying PKCS#11 keystore accessed via the NSS libraries.
    • Re:What it is... (Score:3, Informative)

      by generic-man ( 33649 )
      Camino is written in Cocoa so it uses Mac OS X native widgets for nearly everything, supports system services, and supports accessibility features moreso than Firefox (but less than Safari). Firefox uses XUL with a Mac-like skin for its entire GUI, so it doesn't behave at all like a Mac application.
      • Re:What it is... (Score:5, Informative)

        by klez23 ( 524506 ) <`slashdot' `at' `huzzam.com'> on Tuesday February 14, 2006 @04:57PM (#14719664) Homepage

        FYI, Camino isn't written entirely in Cocoa. The Gecko implementation, and therefore the actual webpage rendering, are in Carbon. This means that things like integrated spellchecking and anything in the Services menu don't work in webpage forms.

        Not to knock it, Camino's my favorite browser. But I do consider that a minor shortcoming.

        Oh, and someone mentioned the inconvenient tab-changing keyboard shortcuts. There are corresponding menu items, so you can just remap those keys using the Keyboard preference pane in System Preferences.

        • The major shortcoming for which I filed bug reports years ago is the still completely fucked up font rendering for Japanese. It still uses fake bold instead of using the bold fonts, and whenever you change the default display settings for the Japanese fonts it starts to trip over its own feet, rendering almost every single character in a different font, using for some Characters even Chinese fonts.

          Nobody seems to bother to fix this, well can you say BROKEN? Unfortunately this makes Camino unusable for me (F
    • Re:What it is... (Score:3, Informative)

      by Anonymous Coward
      Camino is a Mac OS X native Gecko based browser. It uses the latest UI rendering APIs (Cocoa/Quartz called from ObjC). Firefox is a port from OS 9 and below; the rendering still uses the old QuickDraw API.
    • It's much snappier!
  • by rebug ( 520669 ) on Tuesday February 14, 2006 @03:54PM (#14719111)
    Any "Gecko is slow and bloated" arguments can be put to rest with Camino. Before it was a universal binary, Camino weighed in at about 7MB and it absolutely smokes any other Mac browser in terms of performance.
    • by dr.badass ( 25287 ) on Tuesday February 14, 2006 @04:18PM (#14719324) Homepage
      Any "Gecko is slow and bloated" arguments can be put to rest with Camino.

      Meanwhile, "Firefox is slow and bloated" arguments have suddenly gained much more credibility.
      • by John Whitley ( 6067 ) on Tuesday February 14, 2006 @05:09PM (#14719780) Homepage
        At least on Mac OS X, Firefox has some very specific problems that can contribute to this perception.

        Bug 141710: Holding down mouse button forces 100% CPU on Macs [mozilla.org] is a real stinger. It it seems from discussion on this bug and a number of others that the real solution is to move Firefox on OS X off of Carbon and onto the Cocoa framework (Bug 111230: Use Cocoa for Widget instead of Carbon [mozilla.org]. That effort has an independent dev working on a port, but there seems to be little official impetus to make OS X into a first-class platform for Firefox. In response to the obvious cries of "go write code", I don't have the time and/or Cocoa knowledge to efficiently pitch in on this one. Or put another way, I don't have time to be a developer on every app that I use... %-/

        I used to like Camino, and I might give it another whirl, but I've really gotten to like Firefox in many ways. I'm particularly hit by the lack of extensions or search plugins in Camino. In particular, the Web Developer Extension and Live HTTP Headers extension for FF are awesome if you have use for such things. The Sage RSS reader extension is also fairly nice.

    • Uhhh... no. (Score:5, Insightful)

      by binary paladin ( 684759 ) <binarypaladin.gmail@com> on Tuesday February 14, 2006 @05:06PM (#14719767)
      It "absolutely smokes any other Mac broswer in terms of performance?" I'm sorry, have you ever actually used a Mac? Camino is significantly faster than Firefox, more stable and integrated much better, but it certainly doesn't "smoke" Safari. Don't get me wrong, it's my Gecko browser of choice on the Mac, but it doesn't "smoke" Safari by any stretch of the imagination.
      • I've not tried Camino for a while, so I thought I'd give this 1.0 release a spin. The uncluttered interface is nice, but speed-wise it's pretty poor. For example, the digg.com home page loads way, way slower than in Safari. It also doesn't match Safari in outright rendering quality (something which FF also fails on). I think I'll stick with FF for dev tweakery, and Safari for everyday use.
    • Though still Safari scrolls pages smoother and overall easier to use.
      I've tried every gecko browser for Mac OS X, still came back to Safari.
    • Camino ver. 1.0b+1 running 3 mos., is what Safari promised but never delivered. Camino is fast, stable, predictable and productive software. I've stopped using OmniWeb and IE. I've found no use for Safari, Opera or Firefox.

      • by Anonymous Coward
        I've stopped using OmniWeb and IE. I've found no use for Safari, Opera or Firefox.
        let me get this right, you never found a use for three very good OS X browsers, but you did find a use for that POS IE? its not like you get extra compatibility as an excuse like on windows, the thing fucks up rendering pages worse than anything. youre a total tard
  • by Kelson ( 129150 ) * on Tuesday February 14, 2006 @03:54PM (#14719113) Homepage Journal
    The link in the story appears broken. Here's the actual ,a href="http://www.caminobrowser.org/releases/1.0.ph p">Camino 1.0 release notes
  • I just tried Camino (Score:4, Interesting)

    by pHatidic ( 163975 ) on Tuesday February 14, 2006 @04:04PM (#14719191)
    I think I'm going to be a switcher from Firefox. The only problem is that I am having trouble finding some of the extensions I need. Camitools is a good start, but frankly I consider mouse gestures to be essential.
  • My first impression upon hearing this was "did they speed it up"?

    Using it early before FireFox came out, it wasn't my first, second, or thrid browser of choice on the Mac, I even prefered IE over it.

    FireFox still is kind of slow on the OSX, so I won't hold my breath that Camino improves upon it much. Why wouldn't FireFox have the best tech in it compared to Camino?

    But I will give it a try, neither FF or Safari I would say are wonders on the Mac platform. There is only room for improvment for web browsing
  • Interesting to note that they've released Camino 1.0 as a universal binary.

    I believe this makes it only the third released browser to run natively on Intel Macs. Safari was naturally the first, followed by Shiira a few weeks ago.

    The Opera 9 previews have been universal, so we can expect native support when that's released (anyone know when?), and Firefox should be there with the next bugfix/stability release, 1.5.0.2, due (IIRC) in mid-to-late March. Strangely, OmniWeb is still PowerPC only, even though t
    • This would be nice, targeted to Camino 1.1: https://bugzilla.mozilla.org/show_bug.cgi?id=28770 5
    • And this is too, target Camino 1.2: https://bugzilla.mozilla.org/show_bug.cgi?id=30886 3
    • Switching tabs using PowerBook keyboard is also a bit complicated, as one has to press option, and PowerBooks only have the left one, so two hands are needed. Safari has better shortcuts (cmd-shift instead of cmd-option) in this sense.

    Btw, welcome to the wonderful world of universal binaries: multilingual download is now who

    • Switching tabs using PowerBook keyboard is also a bit complicated, as one has to press option, and PowerBooks only have the left one, so two hands are needed. Safari has better shortcuts (cmd-shift instead of cmd-option) in this sense.

      Using the "Keyboard Shortcuts" part of the Keyboard & Mouse System Preference, you can change Camino's "Previous Tab" and "Next Tab" commands to be whatever you want, including the Safari way.
      • Yeah, I actually know. But somehow that crossed into my mind only after hitting "submit". Besides, carefully thought defaults are nice.

        Also, the Keyboard & Mouse prefpane won't let you assign same custom shortcut in two different apps (unless Apple has fixed this since I last checked for it), which is IMO rather stupid and problematic.
      • No you can't - I know because I also don't like the Safari way. With every new Firefox release I've to hack the tabbrowser.xml to reenable ctrl+tab for easy tab switching. I've tried to change the shortcut to anything with the tab key via the pref pane and by changing the shortcut in mainmenu.nib. Both didn't work.

        So I tried to use the key above tab - it's ^ on my keyboard. Unfortunatly that's the code for the ctrl-key in the plist file and even when you use ctrl+tab, which results in "^^" it won't work. I
        • No you can't - I know because I also don't like the Safari way. With every new Firefox release I've to hack the tabbrowser.xml to reenable ctrl+tab for easy tab switching.

          You should try the keyconfig extension, last time I checked it didn't include the option to map previous and next tab so you need to add them as code, but thankfully it's pretty simple.

          Next Tab...
          gBrowser.mTabContainer.advanceSelectedTab(1);

          Previous Tab...
          gBrowser.mTabContainer.advanceSelectedTab(-1);

          This probably won't solve your problem
  • by creimer ( 824291 ) on Tuesday February 14, 2006 @04:14PM (#14719300) Homepage
    It would've been nicer if the summary actually mentioned that this was a browser for Mac OS X. My first thought was that this is another 1.0 product I should avoid since it's crap anyway on the PC. However, a Mac OS X product is different. It should work until the patch comes out.
    • What, the fact that it's under the Apple section didn't clue you in? ;)

    • Camino is a brilliant product and has been in beta for a long time. There was a time when Camino was the only browser worthy of the Mac, not even Opera had a decent product. For quite a while i have been running a nightly build, and it is more or less stable.

      I think one runs Camino, nee Chimera, for the simplicity. There are things one cannot do, and few things that are easy to do. It is fast, often effecient, sometimes a memory hog, but usualy quite a bit better than anything out there.

      I also think

  • Well, I just tried Camino 1.0 on my 2.0 GHz G5. Maybe Camino runs faster on slower machines, but on mine there was no speed difference with respect to FireFox (1.0.6). The choice for me seems to come down to extensions vs. integrated keyring management... I think extensions win.
  • I've been using Camino since it wasn't really all that stable. My question (which I've also posed to the developers) is - when someone is going to include a 'Search Web for "x"' right-click option? This is probably the single most-utilized feature of Firefox that I have come across. And it's not even a clever extension, it's in there right out of the box. Even better would be the ability to link this to multiple/different search engines through preferences. I've looked for this, and the developers said
  • by QuantumG ( 50515 ) <qg@biodome.org> on Tuesday February 14, 2006 @05:29PM (#14719962) Homepage Journal
    Why the hell don't I have this in FireFox? Is this yet another case where behaviour that should be standard is only available in an extension?
  • Nothing to see here, move along. It's still pretty fucking far from being Cocoa, which is immediately evident for those of us who mix "scripts" and "character sets" on web sites. So, no ATSUI. Icelandic characters are approximated by another font than the one specified in the style sheet. The same for Chinese characters outside the GB2312 range. All using Unicode, of course.

    It is also slower than Safari, which is still the undisputed king on the Mac.
    • I actually don't think the majority of people care that much about cocoa v carbon. For most people, viewing most sites, Camino is excellent. I agree Safari is the best, but I don't think it would take much for another browser to take the lead. Omniweb and Firefox are to slow and hog too much memory respectively. If Camino implemented all the Safari crap, including hotkeys, I would consider changing.

      Mind you, if I could theme Safari, I would consider putting OS X on an intel box.
      • They don't care about Cocoa vs Carbon, but in a more an more multilingual world they care about whether their non ASCII language is displayed properly or not.

        Camino for its part, renders Japanese rather ugly with faked bold, and if you ever dare to change the default setting for the fonts for Japanese, it starts rendering every other character in a different font, some of them being Chinese fonts, so the characters look all wrong. This is not even a bug, this is plain broken. It is such a shame, because I r
    • Am I the only person that finds Safari slower than firefox?

      Apparently I am.

  • Can anyone recommend a way to get adblocking comparable to adblock plus for firefox/mozilla? and no, usercontent.css doesnt count. i want context menus, with the abillity to block images/flash/iframes using simple wildcard string (none of that overly complex regexp stuff, i dont want to learn a syntax just to block an ad).

    im actually using safari with safariblock & saft right now since firefox for OS X is so horribly slow. I used camino for a fortnight and loved the responsivness but blocking ads was
    • I block ads at etc/hosts... it doesn't matter what browser I use then. I'd like to see Camino able to add sites to the etc/hosts file on the fly using contextual menu choices, but other than that, it's easy and effective to block ads at the source.
      • heh, thats hardly comparable
        a: /etc/hosts doesnt collapse removed items, leaving big gaps where the ads were. barely any better than having the ad there
        b: /etc/host doesnt allow you to selectively block content from a server. ie, when a site hosts its own ads you're stuffed.
        • I guess the collapsing thing is a Camino feature then, because I don't see the gaps you are talking about. As for sites hosting their own ads, there simply aren't enough of those to annoy me.
      • not trying to be to narky, but ive tried camitools; infact it was mentioned in the very post youre replying to. lack of blocking via context menu is a big issue for me
        • Weeell, SafariBlock on the other hand will give you a context menu, where you can add block settings on the fly, and it also blocks Flash. Time to switch, eh? It also supports more modern features of CSS3 than Camino, I believe, like drop shadows on text etc.
          • Weeell, SafariBlock on the other hand will give you a context menu, where you can add block settings on the fly, and it also blocks Flash. Time to switch, eh? It also supports more modern features of CSS3 than Camino, I believe, like drop shadows on text etc.

            Switch? thats what im currently using, as i mentioned here [slashdot.org], three posts above yours.

            im actually using safari with safariblock & saft right now since firefox for OS X is so horribly slow

            I'd like to switch to Camino as it is definetely more respon

  • Ever since Mac OS X 10.4 or there abouts, Gecko (Firefox has the same problem) has been unable to measure text properly, for some reason. Many pages end up with text hanging raggedly out of the right hand side, white space is missing in front of links, or else links completely overlap the surrounding text. Text entry boxes are unusable because the cursor winds up somewhere to the left of the most recent character entered.
    I used to love Camino, and I try all of the betas, and post updates on bugzilla, but
    • I had the text overlap problem myself. For me, the solution was to check for duplicate fonts in your ~/Library/Fonts folder. There were several Microsoft web core fonts (like Arial) which duplicated OS X fonts of the same name. I dragged the extra .ttf files out of the folder and both Firefox and Camino have looked great ever since.

      The relevant links are 316366 [mozilla.org] and 288047 [mozilla.org]. Links to bugzilla from slashdot are blocked, so you might have to copy/paste the urls.
      • a) That work-around doesn't work for me, for whatever reason, and
        b) it doesn't change the fact that Gecko text rendering is broken, because it's completely legitimate to have fonts (even duplicates) in a personal Library/Fonts directory. No other applications make a hash of it. Safari manages to get it right.
  • Why can't browsers share as many preferences and other data as possible. I want all my browsers to have the smae history, bookmarks, cookies and so on. However, Camino doesn't even read its sibling Firefox' data.

    I know that Camino uses Mac OS X specific technologies like the Keychaing and the built in spell checker. However, I think that solution is less than ideal, to ease migration, both to and from Camino, I think it should at least offer the user to share prefs and other data with Firefox. Or, the other

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