Slashdot is powered by your submissions, so send in your scoop

 



Forgot your password?
typodupeerror

Comment: New drivers much better (Score 3, Informative) 26

by future assassin (#48682005) Attached to: Phoronix Lauds AMD's Open Source Radeon Driver Progress For 2014

I run an A10-5800 and an A-10 7700K and the newest drivers since about 3 months ago give me way better performance now. I normally play Xonotic and with the new drivers with my 5800/DDR3 1833 I can max out the effects settings and still get 60-90 FPS on properly designated maps. If I lower the settings to Normal I get anywhere from 90-140 FPS. Before that I was having issues with Ultra settings and lots of weird movement lag.

Comment: Re:I automatically disbelieved this post (Score 3, Funny) 85

by PopeRatzo (#48681399) Attached to: Google and Apple Weaseling Out of "Do Not Track"

Of course, I have my own opinions but I won't share them because they reflect my own biases.

That may be the single stupidest sentence in the history of stupid sentences on the Internet.

You won't share what you think because it's what you think. Everything you see and think and say and do reflects your own biases. If you decide not to share a single bit of data that is floating around in your head if it happens to reflect your biases, that means you will spend the rest of your life mute, which come to think of it might be best for everyone.

I've just re-read your entire comment and it doesn't seem to say anything at all about anything. Are you a Markov bot? If so, your maker forgot to put in the AI.

Comment: Re:There's no such thing as a free lunch (Score 1) 85

by PopeRatzo (#48681365) Attached to: Google and Apple Weaseling Out of "Do Not Track"

One way or another, you pay for your free Internet services.

It's not "one way or another". It's ONE WAY.

Where do I sign up to pay for Google and Twitter and other internet services directly instead of via my private data? I've been to Google thousands of times, and I've never seen a "subscribe" button.

No, there is no "one way or another". You can ONLY pay for your internet services by letting companies upskirt your private communications and personal data. That gives you some idea of just how valuable your private data really is.

Comment: Re:Frankly... (Score 1) 507

by fyngyrz (#48679073) Attached to: Paul Graham: Let the Other 95% of Great Programmers In

I get the feeling that the programmers who are finding it difficult to find work at the moment are those with mediocre skills

Well, enjoy that feeling. It's worth every penny you paid for it.

As for Musk, he's a big corporate player. Calling him a "programmer" these days is pretty silly. Using him to justify outsourcing basically the majority of programming jobs is also pretty silly.

Note that my employer isn't farming out jobs to foreigners because they're trying to cut costs, but because it is genuinely difficult to find the skills

Yes, it does become difficult if "too old, too unhealthy, no degree, overqualified, wrong state, bad credit" are used as stacked pre-filters. But to argue that unemployed programmers in the US are "mediocre" isn't just silly, it's ridiculous.

Comment: Frankly... (Score 4, Insightful) 507

by fyngyrz (#48678427) Attached to: Paul Graham: Let the Other 95% of Great Programmers In

...when every programmer (and tech support person, and manufacturing person) in the US can get a job, that's the time for US operations to be looking for foreign help.

But since age, health, formal schooling, in-country location, and credit score are widely and consistently used to deny highly skilled US programmers jobs -- I am very confident in saying that Mr. Graham has not even come close to identifying the "programmer problem" from the POV of actual US programmers. All he's trying to do here is save a buck, while screwing US programmers in the process.

Do it his way, and the US economy will suffer even further at the middle class level as decent jobs go directly over our heads overseas, while, as per usual, corporations thrive.

This is exactly the kind of corporate perfidy that's been going on for some time. Graham should be ashamed. He represents our problem. Not any imaginary lack of US based skills.

Comment: Re:Effing Grinches That Spoiled Christmas (Score 1) 159

by PopeRatzo (#48676571) Attached to: Xbox Live and PlayStation Networks Downed By Apparent Attack

I thought you sided with

I don't side with. I side against. Against 8chan pedos. Against rape apologists and definitely against anyone who harass women or condone sexual abuse of children. Against #GamerGate.

And definitely against anyone who would shit all over my long-time preferred pastime of video games the way GamerGate has done. More damage has been done to the gaming community in 2014 than in any time since I've been gaming. And sonny, I've got game cartridges that are older than you are. I've got cheetoh crumbs in my couch that are older than you and your fucked up microscopic cadre of sociopaths.

Comment: Re:Pot, Kettle, irony (Score 1) 358

by fyngyrz (#48676241) Attached to: UK Man Arrested Over "Offensive" Tweet

If the main text of a religion isn't a reliable guidebook to that religion, how can we determine if anything is?

Obviously, we can't.

What made you think we could?

All major (and most minor) religions present huge diversity. Within Christianity, the bible is taken as everything from vague metaphor to the "inerrant word of God." The Koran for Islam, the same. Buddhist practice ranges from meditative to non, from vegetarian to non, from rigidly scientific to the most laughable crystal-gazing nonsense you've ever heard of. New agers.... that's a basket so broad I don't even have a clue as to what it really means, although I have to say, I've rarely come away from someone's description of their new age ideas thinking "wow, that made sense." OK, actually, never. But I figure it could happen. :)

In addition to actual sect differences, there are practitioner differences, and they range all the way from non-believers who are there for the social aspect, to rigid adherents to every jot and tittle in every book (and some, like the Catholics, have quite a few books.)

For my part, I figure, if I want to know what someone thinks, just ask them. Unless I have specific relevant evidence, I don't assume people fit into standardized boxes. I have found that to very rarely be true.

No problem is so formidable that you can't just walk away from it. -- C. Schulz

Working...