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Submission + - Financial advisors disrupted by AI (bloomberg.com)

schwit1 writes: Banks are watching wealthy clients flirt with robo-advisers, and that's one reason the lenders are racing to release their own versions of the automated investing technology this year, according to a consultant.

Robo-advisers, which use computer programs to provide investment advice online, typically charge less than half the fees of traditional brokerages, which cost at least 1 percent of assets under management.

Submission + - UK wants authority to serve warrants in U.S. (usatoday.com)

schwit1 writes: British and U.S. officials have been negotiating a plan that could allow British authorities to directly serve wiretap orders on U.S. communications companies in criminal and national security inquiries, U.S. officials confirmed Thursday.

The talks are aimed at allowing British authorities access to a range of data, from interceptions of live communications to archived emails involving British suspects, according to the officials, who are not authorized to comment publicly.

Under the proposed plan, British authorities would not have access to records of U.S. citizens if they emerged in the British investigations.

Congressional approval would be required of any deal negotiated by the two countries.

Submission + - The average American will spend 43 days of his life on hold (marketwatch.com)

schwit1 writes: Americans will likely waste more than 900 million hours waiting on hold this year, according to an analysis of more than four million phone calls from consumers to businesses released this week by mobile advertising analytics firm Marchex. And a survey by text-message service TalkTo found that more than half of Americans say they spend 10 to 20 minutes every week — or 43 days of their life — on hold.

Submission + - Japan orders SDF to shoot down North Korean missile (japantimes.co.jp)

schwit1 writes: Japan on Wednesday condemned Pyongyang's plan to launch a space rocket, calling it a thinly disguised test of a long-distance ballistic missile.

The government ordered Aegis ballistic missile defense warships of the Maritime Self-Defense Force and land-based Patriot PAC-3 rocket units to respond should projections show components falling in Japanese territory.

"This will effectively mean the firing of a ballistic missile. It would be a clear violation of United Nations Security Council resolutions and a grave, provocative act against the security of our country," Prime Minister Shinzo Abe told a Lower House session Wednesday.

On Tuesday night, North Korea notified the International Maritime Organization that it plans to send a "satellite" into orbit between Feb. 8 and 25. It said the launch will take place on one of those days between 7:30 a.m. and 12:30 p.m. Japan time.

Submission + - Hillary Clinton Forwarded Classified E-Mail From John Kerry Private Account (hotair.com)

An anonymous reader writes: The latest batch of emails released from former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton's home brew personal email server includes an email (pdf) sent from then Senator John Kerry, head of the Senate foreign relations committee, using an unofficial account. As Hot Air notes, "The e-mail in question has four sections redacted in the body, two of which are explicitly marked as SECRET. The declassification date is 5/27/2036, exactly twenty-five years after the original transmission of the message — indicating that the information within it was classified at that time, not by the Inspector General or the State Department as a precaution on its discovery within the system." Hillary Clinton then forwarded that information to another person in the State Department. Also copied on the email was President Obama's National Security Adviser, which raises the questions of what did the White House know, and when did it know it?

Submission + - Stanford psychologist explains why spacing out and goofing off is good for you (washingtonpost.com)

schwit1 writes: We believe that the opposite of focus- daydreaming, goofing off, spacing out- is to be avoided. Worse yet, having problems focusing is seen as an obstacle to overcome and even as pathological. Self- help books and productivity bloggers strive to keep us on task with advice and hacks.

When we fail to come up with the results we were hoping for, we wonder whether we just aren't working or concentrating hard enough. We've come to consider focus and being on as "good," and idleness- especially if it goes on for too long- as "bad" and unproductive. We feel guilty if we spend too much time doing nothing.

But in thinking this way, we make a fundamental mistake.

Truly successful people don't come up with great ideas through focus alone. They are successful because they make time to not concentrate and to engage in a broad array of activities like playing golf. As a consequence, they think inventively and are profoundly creative: they develop innovative solutions to problems and connect dots in brilliant ways.

By naturally tapping into your inner creativity, you reconnect with the joy you had as a child playing. You engage in a positive feedback loop that continues to replenish you with joy and creativity. It makes for an adult life rich with delight and inventiveness.

Submission + - Secret US flight flew over Scottish airspace 'to capture Snowden' (thenational.scot)

schwit1 writes: THE UK GOVERNMENT is facing demands to reveal the details of a secret flight through Scottish airspace which was at the centre of a plot to capture whistleblower Edward Snowden.

The plane, which passed above the Outer Hebrides, the Highlands and Aberdeenshire, was dispatched from the American east coast on June 24 2013, the day after Snowden left Hong Kong for Moscow. The craft was used in controversial US 'rendition' missions.

Reports by Scottish journalist Duncan Campbell claim the aircraft, traveling well above the standard aviation height at 45,000 feet and without a filed flight plan, was part of a mission to capture Snowden following his release of documents revealing mass surveillance by US and UK secret services.

Submission + - Coin toss broke 6 Clinton-Sanders deadlocks in Iowa - and Hillary won each time (marketwatch.com)

schwit1 writes: While it was hard to call a winner between Hillary Clinton and Bernie Sanders last night, it's easy to say who was luckier.

The race between the Democrat presidential hopefuls was so tight in the Iowa caucus Monday that in at least six precincts, the decision on awarding a county delegate came down to a coin toss. And Clinton won all six, media reports said.

Submission + - Porsche on self-driving cars: 'iPhone belongs in your pocket, not on the road' (bgr.com) 1

An anonymous reader writes: elf-driving cars represent the future of the auto industry, right? At the very least, that’s the narrative we seem all too willing to accept at face value as we envision a world where cars drive themselves to and fro while drivers are relegated to mere observers, free to engage in more pressing activities.

Everywhere you look, the biggest names from the tech and auto industry are doubling down on autonomous driving: Mercedes, BMW, Tesla, and Google, just to name a few. Even Apple is reportedly interested in developing a car with autonomous driving capabilities.

But one company steadfastly remaining on the sidelines is Porsche. As Porsche CEO Oliver Blume tells it, no one buys a Porsche because they’re interested in having someone else drive it, especially if that someone else happens to be an advanced computer.

Submission + - The end for Safe Harbor? EU-US trade deal fails on data transfer agreement (cbronline.com)

schwit1 writes: Negotiations between the European Union and US have failed to reach an agreement regarding how data is transferred between the regions.

A deadline for the end of January had been set for a revised Safe Harbour agreement back in October, meaning that three months has gone by without the deadlock being broken.

An agreement is seen as necessary to avoid disruption to the transatlantic digital economy and to help ensure the continuity of service for US and EU companies.

The failure to reach an agreement will likely have on-going ramifications for transatlantic business. Phil Lee, data protection partner, at EU law firm Fieldfisher, said: "The disruption to transatlantic business is absolutely enormous. If you're a US supplier trying to sell into Europe, the tone coming from European customers now is very much one of 'Why should we trust you with our data?'

"Only those suppliers that agree to export data under the EU's Standard Contractual Clauses will have any success in closing commercial deals."

Submission + - Bill Gates monitored MS employees' work hours by memorizing their license plates (foxnews.com) 1

schwit1 writes: Microsoft co-founder Bill Gates used to memorize employees' license plate numbers so that he could keep track of when they were arriving at work and leaving.

"I had to be a little careful not to try and apply my standards to how hard [others at the company] worked. I knew everybody's licence plate so I could look out the parking lot and see, you know, when people come in," he said. "Eventually I had to loosen up as the company got to a reasonable size."

Submission + - US Falls From Sixth Freest Economy in the World to Eleventh Since Obama Took Off (cnsnews.com)

schwit1 writes: Millions of people around the world are emerging from poverty thanks to rising economic freedom. But by sharp contrast, America's economic freedom has been on a declining path over the past decade.

America's declining score in the index is closely related to rapidly rising government spending, subsidies, and bailouts.

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