Want to read Slashdot from your mobile device? Point it at m.slashdot.org and keep reading!

 



Forgot your password?
typodupeerror

Comment Posting this with Pale Moon, 64-bit version. (Score 1) 190

Pale Moon is a version of the Firefox code without a lot of the managerial mistakes made by Mozilla Foundation. Pale Moon has a 64-bit edition that in my experience is far more stable than Firefox. Firefox has memory hogging and subsequent instability that causes it to crash when there are many windows and tabs open.

Usually Firefox add-ons work perfectly with Pale Moon.

Pale Moon has tools for migration from Firefox and for backup. Adblock Latitude blocks ads. There are other Pale Moon add-ons.

Nice add-on for both Firefox and Pale Moon: The Open Link in... add-on provides an "Open Link in Background Tab" option that is good for deciding which Slashdot stories you want to read later.

Submission + - Ask Slashdot: Surge Protection for International Travel?

gaiageek writes: As someone who has lost a laptop power supply (and thus use of the laptop) due to a late-night power surge while traveling in a developing country, I'm acutely aware of the need for surge protection when traveling abroad. While practically all laptop and phone power adapters these days are voltage auto-sensing 100V-240V compatible, most so-called "travel" surge protectors are restricted to either 110V or 220V. Given the space and weight constraints of carry-on only travel, I'd like to avoid having to carry two separate surge protectors knowing I may go from Central America (110V) to Southeast Asia (220V). Strangely, laptop specific surge protectors typically are 100V-240V compatible, but this doesn't provide protection for a phone or tablet that requires the original power supply (can't be charged from a notebook USB port).

Is there really no solution out there short using a 110V-240V notebook surge protector with an adapter to go from a "cloverleaf" notebook plug to a 5-15R (standard US) plug receptacle?

Submission + - Snowden Leaks Cost Pulitzer Winning Journalist W.H. Security Clearance, Job (businessinsider.com)

An anonymous reader writes: Pulitzer prize-winning journalist Ashkan Soltani was recently detailed to the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy from a position at the the Federal Trade Commission. Former Google executive and White House chief technology officer Megan Smith extended a warm welcome. His portfolio at the White House included privacy issues, data ethics, and outreach to the technical community, among others. His drug test was complete, and the FBI investigation for his clearance was under way, when the wheels came off. His clearance was denied. Ashkan's move to the White House surprised some when it was announced due to his history. Ashkan had worked at the Washington Post where he helped analyze and safeguard the Snowden NSA document dump. A technologist at the ACLU noted that Ashkan had published many stories that probably irritated US intelligence officials. Government organizations have previously warned government employees to not access classified information made available in the media. Nobody is directly stating this is the reason, but the subtexts seem clear enough. Ashkan intends to leave Washington and head back to the west coast.

Submission + - GitHub is undergoing a full-blown overhaul as execs and employees depart (businessinsider.com)

mattydread23 writes: This is what happens when hot startups grow up. CEO Chris Wanstrath is imposing management structure where there wasn't much before, and execs are departing, partly because the company is cracking down on remote work. It's a lot like Facebook in 2009. Business Insider has the full inside story based on multiple sources in and close to the company.

Submission + - Listen to a Hawking lecture on Black Holes! (bbc.co.uk)

An anonymous reader writes: The BBC has now put the second of Stephen Hawking's Reith Lectures up on their web site, with accompanying illustrations. It's not 'All you ever wanted to know about Black Holes', but it's an easy introduction to some of the latest thinking on them...

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/scie... refers...

Submission + - Women in biopharma decry booth babes in letter (biocentury.com)

sandbagger writes: A group of women in the pharma industry have signed an open letter asking that the practice of models at events be halted because it's demeaning women. Tech companies have gone through this in fits and starts for years and slid back despite promises.

Submission + - Speeches That Earned Clinton Millions Remain a Mystery (go.com)

mdsolar writes: Hillary Clinton told voters in the latest Democratic debate there's "hardly anything you don't know about me."

Just minutes later, she got tangled in a question about a part of her resume that is an enduring mystery.

In the 18 months before launching her second presidential bid, Clinton gave nearly 100 paid speeches at banks, trade associations, charitable groups and private corporations. The appearances netted her $21.7 million — and voters very little information about what she was telling top corporations as she prepared for her 2016 campaign.

What she said — or didn't say — to Wall Street banks in particular has become a significant problem for her presidential campaign, as she tries to counter the unexpected rise of Democratic rival Bernie Sanders. He's put her in awkward position of squaring her financial windfall with a frustrated electorate.

Asked in the debate — and not for the first time — about releasing transcripts of those speeches, she said: "I will look into it. I don't know the status, but I will certainly look into it." She added, "My view on this is, look at my record."

Submission + - Facebook activists the placebos of democracy?

An anonymous reader writes: Tie-shunning, motorbike-riding former Greek finance minister Yanis Varoufakis is promoting a forum aiming to "democratize" Europe again by 2025. Free software activist Daniel Pocock asks the tough questions about just how effective any such effort can be when it appears to be organized through Facebook and Twitter: rather than shifting the power from Brussels back to the citizen, is Varoufakis' DiEM 25 movement just shifting a little more power to Silicon Valley overlords? Whatever your political stance, how do you feel relying on such platforms and what are the best alternatives?

Submission + - Even with Telemetry Disabled, Windows 10 Talks to Dozens of Microsoft Servers (voat.co) 1

Motherfucking Shit writes: Curious about the various telemetry and personal information being collected by Windows 10, one user installed Windows 10 Enterprise and disabled all of the telemetry and reporting options. Then he configured his router to log all the connections that happened anyway. Even after opting out wherever possible, his firewall captured Windows making around 4,000 connection attempts to 93 different IP addresses during an 8 hour period, with most of those IPs controlled by Microsoft. Even the enterprise version of Windows 10 is checking in with Redmond when you tell it not to — and it's doing so frequently.

Submission + - Why AT&T's Attempt To Kill Municipal Broadband In Tenn. Matters To All Ameri (cio.com)

itwbennett writes: If you don't live in Chattanooga, Tenn., you probably aren't aware that the city's municipally owned electric utility, EPB, provides its broadband Internet — nice, fast Internet to boot. And, even if you did happen to know that, you probably don't care. But CIO's Bill Snyder explains why you should take note of AT&T's efforts to block the expansion of EPB's network on the grounds that 'the government should not compete with private enterprise.' At issue is more than a question of whether the greater Chattanooga area can have access to fast broadband because in all areas of the U.S. 'where big ISPs have the market to themselves, consumers often get stuck in the Web's slow lane,' says Snyder.

Submission + - Have your iPhone 6 repaired, only to get it bricked by Apple (theguardian.com) 1

Nemosoft Unv. writes: In case you had a problem with the fingerprint sensor or some other small defect on your iPhone 6 and had it repaired by a non-official (read: cheaper) shop, you may be in for a nasty surprise: error 53.

What happens is that during an OS update or re-install the software checks the internal hardware and if it detects a non-Apple component, it will display an error 53 and brick your phone. Any photos or other data held on the handset is lost – and irretrievable.
Thousands of people have flocked to forums to express their dismay at this. What's more insiduous is that the error may only appear weeks or months after the repair.

Increduously, Apple says this cannot be fixed by any hard- or software update, while it is clearly their software that causes the problem in the first place.

And then you thought FTDI was being nasty...

Submission + - Undefined behavior is closer than you think

Andrey_Karpov writes: Some people think that undefined behavior is caused only by gross errors (accessing outside the bounds of the array, for instance) or inadequate constructions (i = i++ + ++i, for example). That's why it is quite surprising when a programmer sees undefined behavior in the code that used to work correctly, without arousing any suspicion. One should never let his guard down, programming in C/C++. Because hell is closer than you may think.

Slashdot Top Deals

The world is no nursery. - Sigmund Freud

Working...