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New Eternal Darkness Titles Promised 66

Posted by Zonk
from the cthulu-tastic dept.
1up reports that Silicon Knights, maker of the Too Human and Eternal Darkness games, have promised they plan to return to Eternal Darkness at some point in the future. I wouldn't hold your breath for it, though. Any sequel to the Lovecraft-inspired horror title will be some time in coming. From the article: "'Although this [Eternal Darkness 1] is just one story we had in mind for the Eternal Darkness universe, there are even more manipulations, great ancients, and numerous other stories to tell...' The outspoken developer continues on by describing how their plans for Eternal Darkness tie into Too Human, as well; the upcoming trilogy represents an evolution of the studio's concept for Eternal Darkness. Instead of holding off on sequel treatments, however, they've instead decided to plan an overarching three-part story from day one. "
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New Eternal Darkness Titles Promised

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  • It is not a game, it is a screensaver !

  • by Anonymous Coward on Saturday July 08, 2006 @05:42PM (#15684649)
    Not a poxy computer game, no, I Lucifer, lord of all that is dark and fun, will bring the real thing to you all within the next 3 months.

    Eternal Darkness.

    No moonlight. No starlight. No damn sunlight. Just darkness.

    fo'real.

    However I require minions - hence I appeal here amongst the dark dwellers, the basement lurkers, the sunlight avoiders - join me, and become all powerful - the meek shall rise in my dominion of pain and fire. Dark Fire. Very dark black evil fire. And chains and non-stop Industrial Noise. And Britney. My Eternal Kingdom of Darkness, With Me, and YOU, leading the afflicted, the ex-sunlight people.

    Join me! Sign up here, today, and receive a free 'eternal darkness' ballpoint pen. Black ink, of course :)
  • by mbourgon (186257) on Saturday July 08, 2006 @05:54PM (#15684695) Homepage
    Ya know, it helps if people are familiar with whatever the heck you're talking about, when you mention some sort of sequel.

    http://cube.ign.com/articles/363/363071p1.html [ign.com]

    "Developer Silicon Knights' psychological thriller Eternal Darkness: Sanity's Requiem [...]travels gamers through the depths of time and challenges them to complete quests using a dozen different characters[...]GameCube"

    It's apparently some sort of Alone In The Dark survival horror thing, on the Gamecube.
  • I won't give away some of the gimmicks that the first game pulled off, but WOW. When I played it, alone, at 2AM, with the lights out, and (you know what) kept happening, I was SO freaked out at first, before I realized what was going on!

    SO awesome!

    • I must agree Eternal Darkness was friggin' creepy with all the lights turned out, it was creepy in general until you figured out what was going on. Even worse with the surround sound going. My girlfriend won't even watch me play it late at night it creeps her out so much. It is honestly one of the "best games no one has really heard of" on the Cube. It didn't release to a lot of fanfare, and it died out pretty quick... I've still got my copy mainly because I haven't totally completed it yet, just have t
    • Yeah, I'd heard that the game plays a lot of tricks. I finally got around to getting it a couple of weeks ago - I went through the intro and was about 1 minute into the game and then I wasn't totally surprised when the screen froze. I was a bit more confused when nothing I did could make anything happen. Then downright spooked when I turned the gamecube off and the image was still there.

      It turns out my VGA adaptor broke. :)
  • Why you should care (Score:5, Informative)

    by DoctaWatson (38667) on Saturday July 08, 2006 @06:16PM (#15684758)
    Eternal Darkness: Sanity's Requiem is one of the best games for the Gamecube, putting it squarely among the top games of this ending generation.

    You could call it a "survival horror" and leave it at that, but it hardly seems much like Silent Hill or Resident Evil. In those games, the fear is created by the big scary monster in the next room. You can eventually desensitize yourself to that kind of fear by playing on the assumption that there's a monster around every corner.

    In Eternal Darkness the fear is created by the sense that you are losing your mind. There are hundreds of little tricks the game uses to mess with your mind, and they're so varied and frequent that at least a few of them will catch even the most hardened player off guard.

    On top of the sanity system, the game has a fantastic atmosphere that's Lovecraft-inspired but spans many different eras in human history. You'll play in Ancient Persia, Medieval Europe, 1950's America- and each time as a different (and likely doomed) protagonist.

    There's also some fairly complex (in console terms) magic and combat systems.

    If you own a Gamecube, this game is very much worth playing (or even owning). It can easily be found used for under $10.
    • The most interesting and innovative aspect of Eternal Darkness was how it breaks the fourth wall. Each sanity trick works once, and then it's mostly an annoyance for the rest of the game (except for some of the cheap scare tactics like you get in most horror movies these days--these are situational and you don't tend to come across them more than once, anyway).
      • My favorite insanity effect was the game pretending that it reset and went back to the title screen. I almost threw my controller at the wall. Deleting all my save games was also a nice insanity generator.
      • by TiggsPanther (611974) <tiggs.m-void@co@uk> on Sunday July 09, 2006 @04:55PM (#15687925) Journal
        Each sanity trick works once, and then it's mostly an annoyance for the rest of the game (except for some of the cheap scare tactics like you get in most horror movies these days--these are situational and you don't tend to come across them more than once, anyway).

        Oh, I dunno. Some of them had repeat value. The size-adjusting ones, for example. Because it was a gradual change there was always this moment of thinking your eyes were tried before realising what was going on.

        Also I found the basic insanity was really qutie creepy. Tilted screen, windchimes in the background and a constant buzz of screams and voices. If nothing else, I found it quite unsettling. It certainly conveyed the feeling of "something's not quite right", and gave a visual barometer of insanity without needing to see the green meter.

    • Eternal Darkness: Sanity's Requiem is one of the best games for the Gamecube, putting it squarely among the top games of this ending generation.

      Amen, if a friend of mine hadn't had a Gamecube already (convenient =P) this would have been the one game that made me buy a GCN.

      Wind Waker was great, too, some other stuff were nice party games but Eternal Darkness is brilliant and a Gamecube exclusive and to me (YMMV) it's the only game with that special combination of attributes =)

    • There's also some fairly complex (in console terms) magic and combat systems.

      The magic system is great, except it's way overpowered. Your magic meter recharges simply by moving around. Once you get the recover spell about 1/3 thru the game, there is no more challenge. You recover some health, walk in a circle a few times, and then you can cast it again.

      As for the combat, it's interesting how it lets you target different body parts, however, there really isn't any reason to target anything other than the hea
      • Graphically, the game isn't very impressive, although it does get better towards the end.
        Well, I thought the game looked pretty good for a game that was originally supposed to come out on the N64 near the end of it's life. And it looked damned impressive for an N64 game.
        • It would've looked amazing for an N64 game, and ok if it was, say, a PS2 launch title, but it wasn't either. It was part of the second wave of GameCube titles, yet it didn't look as good as the GameCube launch titles.
    • "Eternal Darkness: Sanity's Requiem is one of the best games for the Gamecube, putting it squarely among the top games of this ending generation."

      While I agree Eternal darkness was good, it certainly wasn't anything revolutionary. Many surival horror games before it were just as good as ED. Take RE4 for instance, a game that just oozes amazingness.

      Eternal darkness for me, while it was good, lacked in some instances in overall experience. Not to mention the sales were not exactly mindboggling if my mind
    • I don't call it survival horror, I call it mindless hack&slay which pulls the occassional prank on you. Your character is way too strong for any sense of fear to arise (never mind the ability to save almost everywhere) and the titular darkness makes it impossible to play the game at any time but the darkest nights*. That last bit is the biggest reason I don't play "horror" titles a lot, I don't want to plan my day around them just to make sure it's dark enough that I can see the walls in the game.

      The sp
    • There are hundreds of little tricks the game uses to mess with your mind
      Not quite hundreds. Maybe a dozen or two.
  • by LordZardoz (155141) on Saturday July 08, 2006 @06:24PM (#15684793)
    As far as I know, Nintendo has the rights to the IP for Eternal Darkness, since they published it as a 2nd party title. Also, the split between Nintendo and Silicon Knights was somewhat rancorous as I understand it. Given that, it seems unlikely that a sequel will happen unless Silicon Knights can persuade a publisher to buy the IP from Nintendo.

    The only other viable situation would be for the game to come out on the Wii, but that wont happen unless the poeple at Ninendo or those at Silicon KNights that were central to the split have parted ways or something.

    Of course, I could just be wildly mistaken about who currently holds the rights to the IP.

    END COMMUNICATION
    • Of course, I could just be wildly mistaken about who currently holds the rights to the IP.

      I could see it going either way. ED was an *awesome* game, but it apparently sold very poorly, so I doubt Nintendo is really going to hold tightly onto it.

      It seems like kind of a moot point, though. Silicon Knights finished Blood Omen (with the help of some Crystal Dynamics staff) in 1996. Eternal Darkness didn't come out until seven years later. Too Human is *still* unreleased, and they were working on that as a PS1 t
    • Nintendo owns the IP for Eternal Darkness. That doesn't prohibit Silicon Knights from working with Nintendo for a sequel. From what I have heard, the split was pretty amicable.

      From what Dyack has to say in an interview here [gamasutra.com], SK learned a lot from Nintendo and here [ign.com] he stated that future games with Nintendo would be a possibility.

      They probably have some rough storyline ideas and could even have some Wiimote gameplay ideas. Dyack bringing up Eternal Darkness again means that there could be talks... or not.
      • They better more thought out pillars of bone in the sequel. Fresh human bodies suck for construction work; once they start decomposing, the weight of the structure can cause a collapse. I'm just sayin' is all.

        Yeah, but Pure Evil holds it all together. It's like epoxy resin, that Pure Evil.
  • Why does this promise of a sequel merit a Slashdot article?

    Maybe it can be considered a decent niche game, but nothing major.

    I received it bundled with my Gamecube, but I gave up after 3 hours of play: I was bored.

    The cool part: the "insanity" concept. Nothing new but it worked rather well.

    The bad part: which zombie size do you want today? S/M/L? Because that is the only monster you will see for hours. Ahhh, another room full of: 3 Small zombies, 2 medium ones and one big one. Woah, exciting...

    Anyway, if yo
  • by Opportunist (166417) on Sunday July 09, 2006 @08:46PM (#15688435)
    ED:SR was a great game. Wonderful horror effects, nice puzzles, good story, good mood, everything was in its place. Especially the idea to play with the player's perception, to have him "loose his mind" with effects like it telling you your controller isn't plugged in (while your character seems to get eaten by the monsters, only to drop you back to the point before the incident and your character whimpering about him losing his mind), your save games are gone or similar little gimmicks all added to a nice immersion. I dimly remember that, after the first 3 chapters or so, they added some kind of cheap credits, giving you the impression it's over and you should go buy the sequel if you want to see the real end...

    Even the "reuse" of places, something I usually loathe in games because it makes it look cheap, was very well explained in the story, the places grew from level to level and it was quite interesting to see them "develop" and change during the centuries. A small chapel from the 8th century turns, in a later level, into a cathedral (about 15th century), which is then used as a military hospital during WW1.

    What bugged me to no end was its length. It was simply too short. First game lasted 20 hours, replays can be done in just under 5. And there's little reason to replay it. Aside of beating it with all the 3 available "gods" (and thus get to see the ultimate ending), I found no "easter egg", no goodie to be unlocked, no bonus to be had.

    If they manage to give it more story and longer gameplay, this is going to define new standards for the horror genre.

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