Forgot your password?
typodupeerror

Comment: Re:alamo drafthouse (Score 2) 409

by lordmatthias215 (#39348405) Attached to: What Is Your Favorite Way of Watching a Movie
I've tried a lot more craft beers at the Alamo than I do at home. They even have a monthly "Meet the Brewer" event where you can meet a local brewer, taste a new recipe, and watch a fun movie. Alamo is not your typical cinema by any stretch. They won't even let kids in to most showings (there are a few designated shows each month) and kick people out for talking or using their phones if they get two complaints. I don't think it's hit every branch yet, but the Alamo by my house has 4K digital projectors, in auditoriums no bigger than the average dollar theater. It's bliss. And the tickets aren't any more expensive than the crap "standard" theaters around town--they're actually cheaper than some.

Comment: Re:alamo drafthouse (Score 1) 409

by lordmatthias215 (#39348399) Attached to: What Is Your Favorite Way of Watching a Movie
To be honest, after going to a couple dozen shows at various Alamos across Austin, I've yet to even hear anyone talk (except for one old lady who fell asleep next to me and started mumbling quietly). The theater makes it pretty clear before the feature, with a large variety of trailers (including voicemail left by angry teenage girls who were ejected) so you don't tune out the tenth time you visit. And like @euroq says, the beers are actually no more expensive than your standard casual restaurant/local haunt, and a lot more thought goes into the menus and wine/beer lists. They also do seasonal menus, as well as special menus for their special events or really big releases. Heck, they even hold a LOTR marathon with a hobbit-style eleven-course meal (complete with drink pairings) roughly once a year. The point is, it's the best movie experience I've ever had, and if you ever find yourself near one, I encourage you to try it.

Comment: Re:Sshh.. (Score 1) 203

by lordmatthias215 (#34733336) Attached to: EU Wants Power To Block China's Tech Buying
That's all well and good if you don't expect China (or any other "destination" country) to notice the increased regulation. Any sort of regulation in this way increases tensions between the regulating country and those affected by the regulations, and that tension is proportional to how much the regulated were benefiting from the now-limited behaviors.

Comment: Re:One more time (Score 1) 203

by lordmatthias215 (#34733298) Attached to: EU Wants Power To Block China's Tech Buying
While the internet is certainly fault tolerant, I don't think that's the issue here. I may have read the OP wrong, but it sounds like the EU is concerned about economic tactics in considering this limitation- they don't want China to buy up firms that deal and develop technology key to the European economy, thereby taking money that would have gone to EU members and routing it to China. Either way, even with a fault tolerant internet, there are other technologies that are not fault tolerant but exist on the net. Just because the whole network doesn't go down doesn't mean that nodes which perform other key functions to a country are impervious.

Comment: Re:Two words: (Score 2, Insightful) 888

by lordmatthias215 (#19203445) Attached to: Texting Teens Generating OMG Phone Bills
hmm, last time I checked, patting a kid on the butt isn't really abuse- I got spanked a few times in my day, but looking back, they didn't even really hurt- it was more the shame of it than anything else. And if you think missing a single meal for misbehavior is reprehensible, take a trip to Africa. I know that example is overused, but seriously- the kid could quite possibly use a few less calories anyway, if obesity is as big an epidemic as the media says. As for kicking your kid out of the car, my parents never did that to me, but at the same time my mom walked home by herself every day from elementary school through high school, without a key to get into the house, and she's not exactly running up therapy costs because of it. Be an adult and punish your children when they go astray. If you're a good parent, you'll know the difference between being a friend and being a parent.

I'm a teenager living in my parent's house, and I can honestly tell you I'm glad they spanked me and grounded me and chewed me out when I was younger, because it taught me not to give them a reason to punish me further on in life. I'm sick of parents who let their kids (my friends) do whatever they want because they're more concerned with being the child's friend than being their parent. Sure, you can be friends with your kids, but you still have to be an authority figure and prepare them for the real world, where they can't do whatever they want without repercussions. Be there to talk to them, laugh with them, and help them with problems, but also be there to slap their hands when the reach for the cookie jar out of turn. If you're a good parent, you'll know how to balance friendship and authority.

That being said, you obviously need to be responsible in your punishments. Spank your child, but don't beat the crap out of them with a wooden switch. Ground them from something they hold dear, but not from something they need- monitor computer use so it's only for homework, or limit their cell phone to family numbers and 911. Send them to bed without supper, but make them a decent breakfast the next day, and talk things over with them as they eat (this an especially good way to show you've forgiven them and make amends). Kick them out of the car on the way home from school, but not a long way from home. Don't take your anger out on them- you want to teach them, not torture them. If you're a good parent, you'll know the difference.

On the Internet, nobody knows you're a dog. -- Cartoon caption

Working...