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Submission + - Cylance Accused of Distributing Fake Malware Samples to Customers to Close Deals (arstechnica.com)

nyman19 writes: Ars Technica reports how security vendor Cylance has been distributing non-functioning malware samples to prospective customers in order to "close sales by providing files that other products wouldn't detect."

According to the report: “A systems engineer at a large company was evaluating security software products when he discovered something suspicious. One of the vendors [Cylance] had provided a set of malware samples to test—48 files in an archive stored in the vendor's Box cloud storage account...Curious, the engineer took a closer look at the files in question—and found that seven weren't malware at all.”

Submission + - Apple has a secret team working on the holy grail for treating diabetes (cnbc.com)

schwit1 writes:

Apple has hired a small team of biomedical engineers to work at a nondescript office in Palo Alto, miles from corporate headquarters. They are part of a super secret initiative, initially envisioned by the late Apple co-founder Steve Jobs, to develop sensors that can non-invasively and continuously monitor blood sugar levels to better treat diabetes, according to three people familiar with the matter.

Such a breakthrough would be a “holy grail” for life sciences. Many life sciences companies have tried and failed, as it’s highly challenging to track glucose levels accurately without piercing the skin.

The initiative is far enough along that Apple has been conducting feasibility trials at clinical sites across the Bay Area and has hired consultants to help it figure out the regulatory pathways, the people said.

From a business aspect, the most interesting part of this venture might be how Apple combines its penchant for secrecy with maneuvering through those regulatory pathways. It’s one thing to introduce another new bit of consumer electronics kit. It’s an entirely other thing to get a medical device past the FDA.

Submission + - The War on Science: Forensics (washingtonpost.com)

hondo77 writes: Thought the Trump Administration's War on Science(tm) was just about climate change? Think again. "Attorney General Jeff Sessions will end a Justice Department partnership with independent scientists to raise forensic science standards and has suspended an expanded review of FBI testimony across several techniques that have come under question, saying a new strategy will be set by an in-house team of law enforcement advisers." The National Commission on Forensic Science, "jointly led by Justice and the Commerce Department’s National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) has prompted several changes," including "new accrediting and ethical codes for forensic labs and practitioners" and the FBI abandoning "its four-decade-long practice of tracing bullets to a specific manufacturer’s batch through chemical analyses after its method were scientifically debunked."

Submission + - 650m Astroid Will Fly Past Earth On 19 April (phys.org)

William Robinson writes: A relatively large, 650m, near-Earth asteroid discovered nearly three years ago will fly safely past Earth on April 19 at a distance of about 1.1 million miles (1.8 million kilometers), or about 4.6 times the distance from Earth to the moon. The asteroid will approach Earth from the direction of the sun and will become visible in the night sky after April 19. It is predicted to brighten to about magnitude 11, when it could be visible in small optical telescopes for one or two nights. For comparison, Chelyabinsk meteor was 20m.

Submission + - Google X works an older guy until he's hospitalized and then they lay him off (businessinsider.com)

Julie188 writes: When Google shows up to buy your startup and trade out your relatively worthless startup stock for Google stock, and offers you a high paying job, too, it seems like a dream come true. But for a group of ex-military guys at a startup called Project Titan, it was more like a nightmare, according to this detailed article from Business Insider. After Google buys their company, it shuts it down, gets them to move across the country to California and then sets them up working long hours outdoors in 100-degree heat. One older guy, in his mid-50s, was even hospitalized, and when he returned to work, he was essentially pushed out. Some people claimed it was bias against older workers and veterans.

Submission + - Amazon Is Dead Serious About Delivering Your Goodies by Drone (backchannel.com)

mirandakatz writes: Amazon recently had its first public test flight of a delivery drone, proving that it's incredibly serious about making drone delivery a real thing, and soon. At Backchannel, Steven Levy provides some much-needed context, pointing out that everyone brushed off drone delivery as a publicity stunt when Amazon announced it back in 2013–but now, it's clear the company is investing heavily in bringing drone-delivered goodies to the masses, ASAP.

Submission + - SPAM: Tractor Owners Using Pirated Firmware To Dodge John Deere's Ham-Fisted Attempt T

An anonymous reader writes: We've been noting for a while how numerous states have been pushing so-called "right to repair" bills, which would make it easier for consumers to repair their own products and find replacement parts and tools. Not surprisingly, many tech companies have been working overtime to kill these bills. That includes Apple, which recently proclaimed that Nebraska's right to repair bill would turn the state into a nefarious playground for hackers. Opposition also includes Sony and Microsoft, which both tend to enjoy a repair monopoly on their respective video game consoles.
Link to Original Source

Submission + - Google Plans to Alter JavaScript Popups After Abuse from Tech Support Scammers (bleepingcomputer.com)

An anonymous reader writes: Chromium engineers are discussing plans to change how JavaScript popups work inside Chrome and other similar browsers. In a proposal published on the Google Developers portal, the Chromium team acknowledged that JavaScript popups are consistently used to harm users.

To combat this threat, Google engineers say they plan to make JavaScript modals, like the alert(), confirm(), and dialog() methods, only work on a per-tab basis, and not per-window. This change means that popups won't block users from switching and closing the tab, putting an end to any overly-aggresive tactics on the part of the website's owner(s).

There is no timeline on Google's decision to move JavaScript popups to a per-tab model, but Chromium engineers have been debating this issue since July 2016 as part of Project OldSpice. A similar change was made to Safari 9.1, released this week. Apple's decision came after crooks used a bug in Safari to block users on malicious pages using popups. Crooks then tried to extort payment, posing as ransomware.

Submission + - Hobbyist Turns Nintendo 64 Console into Nintendo Switch Dock (polygon.com)

adosch writes: Polygon reports, a Reddit user "modified a broken Nintendo 64 and transformed it into a functioning Switch dock." The modder, who goes by the handle 'Tettzan Zone', has "been keeping fellow Switch fans updated on his adventures in console customization on Reddit, sharing the steps he took to making the entire Nintendo 64 workable as a dock." The original post about full mod details can be found here.

Submission + - How to Protect the Internet

Jason Koebler writes: The rhetoric and actions of the Republican-dominated Congress and FCC show that federal regulations that can be easily undone or ignored are not a long-term solution if we want to protect the open internet and consumer privacy.
To preserve the open internet, there must be more broadband competition and more consumer choice. This goal is going to be accomplished through local- and state-level activism and entrepreneurship, not through federal regulations.

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