Catch up on stories from the past week (and beyond) at the Slashdot story archive

 



Forgot your password?
typodupeerror
Check out the new SourceForge HTML5 internet speed test! No Flash necessary and runs on all devices. ×

Comment Re:Dangerous (Score 1) 297

I'm pretty sure I'd see features like independently powered exit row lighting, emergency exits, inflatable slides/rafts, life vests etc.

In design and engineering you can't make things failure-proof, but you can plan for certain failure-modes. Yeah, if you lose a wing at 10,000 feet or do a nose dive at Mach 2 into the ground nobody is going to survive. But there is plenty of design that goes into an airplane that is aimed at very rare situations like the loss of all engines.

Comment Re:Unfortunately no and I have a reason (Score 1) 335

The Abelson and Sussman textbook, Structure and Interpretation of Computer Programs, uses LISP (actually Scheme). There are quite a few LISP fanatics who passionately feel it is still the best programming language made, citing such reasons as the simplicity of writing an interpreter for it. However, that textbook is pretty difficult. The authors didn't appreciate how hard recursion can be for many students to understand, and LISP and functional programming in general uses recursion so heavily it's the proverbial hammer for every nail of a programming problem.

Well, that's what you get when you beta test your textbook with MIT students. But that said, CLRS is no picnic for people who aren't very good at math, either.

Comment Re:See??? (Score 2) 297

You're missing the point. The mechanical possibility that the car can lock someone in is a safety hazard. Sure, it's great when it locks a car thief in on purpose, not so great if it locks someone in accidentally on a hot day or if the car has been in an accident (especially if it's on fire).

It's not a theoretical matter, people have died that way.

Comment Yes, we do (Score 1) 296

Both sides in this information war are using propaganda.

Does Russia spend money to improve its image, including on social media? You can bet they do. Just like every other country in the world. Are there people paid to troll anti-russian comments? I wouldn't be surprised. But the question the article raises is a good question as well: Are there people paid to troll pro-russian comments? I wouldn't be surprised, either. And frankly speaking to me it seems like it, because if you post anything pro-russian or just with a balanced view, you do get shouted down as a Putin-lover or whatever.

Comment Re:Amateur Sys-admin deserves the time (Score 1) 125

When I do contract work, I always request that any credentials I might have had be revoked, both to encourage good practice and to make sure I don't get blamed for whatever might happen after I leave.

Sometimes they do and sometimes (after entering anopther contract with them) I find my old creds still valid.

Comment Re:Not a unique situation (Score 2) 110

I bought a PC a while back which the family stopped using because they forgot their password and couldn't get in and it didn't come with media so they could recover it, obviously they never made recovery media but I'm sure lots of people don't — and of those who do, probably very many of them lose it anyway. I recovered the Admin password and ran the recovery on the hidden partition and bingo, back to factory state.

There's a shitload of people buying PCs for no good reason all the time.

Comment Federal elections should be federal (Score 1) 506

In Germany we have "Voting Districts" which all have the same amount of registered voters, They determine who get's into the Bundestag, There is one direct mandate and one federal mandate. Direct candidates can get in if they are elected by the majority of voters of their district. There are a few prominent examples of this happening.

The German system is a little complicated and perhaps bloated - our Bundestag is 600+ people and could lose a hundred or so without hurtung anyone - but the key issue is this one: Federal elections are federal and are counted at federal scale. State elections are counted at state level with representatives of each state forming the "Bundesrat", the counter-balance for the "Bundestag". That way there is a nice balance of power. Gridlock is less in Germany, because any party can join the fray (A party needs 5000 signatures to be able to found itself). That way we have coalitions and a good balance of power. At the same time Germany has a 5% hurdle parties need to take in order to be able to join the Bundestag, which prevents excess fragmentation and a chaos we had back in the Weimar Republik, pre-Third-Reich.

A good example for a flexible balance of power is the "big coalition" with Angela Merkel as Chancellor. Because the larger "Peoples Parties" SPD and CDU lost voters in the last 3 decades, they are forced to work together and keep an eye out for protest movements and Germanys equivalent of alternative conservatives such as the AFD. The Germany federation works surpsiingly well and also is quite stable.

All in all I think the Germany system has some very neat democratic mechanisms that the US should really try out.
My first order would be: Federal elections are federal, no intermediate 'state' level election.

Comment Re:Why can't this be detected (Score 1) 107

That shouldn't cause a lot of false lockups since it has to be different sites. How often do you even use your credit card on 2 different sites within one minute?

The real issue is, as you say, the crooks will just go low and slow to avoid the lockout. It's the same problem with password guessing. Since they don't care which particular card is solved when, they can just do many in parallel, all just below the lockout threshold and still solve cards at a high rate.

Comment Re:I think the answer is obvious (Score 1) 256

Reliable is more important than cheap.

You need both for uptake. The average person won't spend more than about $300 for a gadget, and they'd rather spend $100. $300 is a pretty feasible price target for a small printer with one extruder. You could sell it without a heated bed at that price, and tell people to print only in PLA. There is high-temp PLA now which can be annealed in an oven and then handle somewhat higher temperatures, so that would cover most people's needs. Do a delta since it is cheaper to make it stable and avoid backlash, and because it uses only four sensors — ideally three hall for the X Y Z_MAX, and an inductive on the Z_MIN for bed leveling. $300 is not even a challenging price point; it can be even cheaper if you skip a display, which I don't actually think is that useful if you're not installing the printer in a remote location.

Slashdot Top Deals

The decision doesn't have to be logical; it was unanimous.

Working...