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Comment Re: A couple of problems (Score 1) 110

Thousands of images are often used in medical imaging for a single scan. I have a production filesystem with 2B images, over 200TB. 16TB file sizes aren't all that hard to come by either. Obviously there is also the birthday problem, ZFS alleviates it by using bit comparisons in combination with 128 bit checksums.

I'm baffled that 48 bit checksums is still considered good enough nowadays.

Comment Re: So do tell (Score 1) 124

I'm sure you have experience porting stuff from the early .NET or VB6 era.

Entire enterprises have been written on the back of Excel scripts, Word integrations and Access databases. VB6 is/was a step up on that and can contain entire ERP's. .NET has improved but the ancestors of current iterations (anything pre-3.5 IMHO) were horrible to use and had many kludges, most of those kludges are the reasons why there is STILL no backwards or Mono compatibility for many components.

Comment Re: So do tell (Score 1) 124

Most likely because it needs to run VB6 scripts to talk to the devices or some .NET flavor, most likely v1 or v2. Bad programmers know only bad languages.

In a lot of cases these companies, especially in the various construction and utilities, will have hired a programmer to make something in the late 90s and that same program now operates their entire fleet of devices. They don't want to spend the money on another programmer or systems design engineer so they still operate on the same hardware, same power supplies, same chipsets, same control and operating systems from that era even though much more faster, efficient and safer systems exist.

Submission + - Wikipedia blocked in Turkey (turkeyblocks.org)

Ilgaz writes: The Turkey Blocks monitoring network has verified restrictions affecting the Wikipedia online encyclopaedia in Turkey. A block affecting all language editions of the website detected at 8:00AM local time Saturday 29 April. The loss of availability is consistent with internet filters used to censor content in the country.

Comment Misleading title (Score 1) 62

It can create the foam structure in about 14 hours. Then you have to insert your electric wiring and plumbing, then you have to pour over concrete and let it cure - a process that takes ~30 days.

From the pictures it seems like the thing is stationary with a fairly 'short' arm so you'll be limited by the actual 'size' of the robot, a small igloo-type structure is all it seems to be capable of (although longer arms are probably feasible, they would obviously increase the base cost).

Comment Re:ALSO worth noting... (Score 1) 88

The specifications still exist though, regardless of the false advertising, only in the US and for the better part of the last decade has the FCC and other government organizations given latitude to providers to allow falsely advertised network generations (part of the so-called 'net neutrality' laws allowing T-Mobile and others to zero-rate their content).

The 5G spec won't even be finished until 2020 so it's impossible for anyone, even AT&T to currently even create modems, antenna systems or implementations based on 5G. 5G technology probably won't be available in mainstream mobile devices until at least 2025.

Comment Re:ALSO worth noting... (Score 1) 88

In the EU you can get 100Mbps speeds on a phone. It correctly identifies 3G/LTE/4G according to your plan, the cheaper plans still being 3G ($5-15/mo) and the more expensive plans ($20-50) giving you more speeds. Data is usually unlimited (or at least has a very high limit) but text and voice are limited on a per minute/SMS. Most countries also require all phones to be unlocked and portable.

Comment Re: Well, sadly, probably.... (Score 1) 387

1) Most of those agreements, if made too broad could be unenforceable especially if your imaginary property has nothing related to your job or assignments.

2) If you're working on your own project, you should not consider it being on company time if you're salaried, even though you may be physically "there", again, as long as it's not related to your job or using significant resources from the company.

3) Most companies just have it as boilerplate and don't really care or know what you invent (just don't tell them)

Comment Re: You were hired to work for THEM (Score 1) 387

I'm salaried. I didn't agree to work any particular times or length, just to finish my job in the way and time I see fit. State law, managers, meeting schedules and/or insurance requires me to be at my job from 8-5 with a mandatory 1 hour break throughout - guess what - I could play video games or do side work, some may be beneficial to the company, sometimes I need time to relax, sometimes it's improving open source software. I also respond to emergencies outside those hours, as an hourly employee I would be entitled to 1.5-3x the wage, so my hours worked outside count similarly double or triple.

Submission + - MIT creates 3D-printing robot that can construct a home off-grid in 14 hours (mit.edu)

Kristine Lofgren writes: Home building hasn't changed much over the years, but leave it to MIT to take things to the next level. A new technology built at MIT can construct a simple dome structure in 14 hours and it's powered by solar panels, so you can take it to remote areas. MIT's 3D-printing robot can construct the entire basic structure of a building and can be customized to fit the local terrain in ways that traditional methods can't do. It even has a built-in scoop so it can prepare the building site and gather its own construction materials.

Submission + - Elon Musk on why he doesn't like flying cars: 'That is not an anxiety-reducing' (yahoo.com)

boley1 writes: Elon Musk on why he doesn't like flying cars: 'That is not an anxiety-reducing situation'.

According to Musk, the main challenges with flying cars are that they'll be noisy and generate lots of wind because of the downward force required to keep them in the air. Plus, there's an anxiety factor.

"Let's just say if something is flying over your head...that is not an anxiety-reducing situation," he said. "You don’t think to yourself 'Well, I feel better about today. You’re thinking'Is it going to come off and guillotine me as it comes flying past?'

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