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Comment Change the name to "Crash Supersonic"? (Score 2) 53

"... marketing geniuses..."

Apparently a lot of technically-knowledgeable people don't have social ability. Boom Supersonic!!! "Boom" is what you hear when there is a crash.

There are many more like that. For example, Malwarebytes is software named after the problem it is supposed to cure. Doesn't anyone at BOOM have a mother?

Son: Mom, what do you think of the name BOOM for our company?

Mom: No, son, that's not a good name.

Son: Why not?

Mom: You're only 3 years old. You'll understand when you are 4.

Submission + - An Unexpected New Lung Function Has Been Found - They Make Blood (sciencealert.com)

schwit1 writes: Researchers have discovered that the lungs play a far more complex role in mammalian bodies than we thought, with new evidence revealing that they don't just facilitate respiration — they also play a key role in blood production.

In experiments involving mice, the team found that they produce more than 10 million platelets (tiny blood cells) per hour, equating to the majority of platelets in the animals' circulation. This goes against the decades-long assumption that bone marrow produces all of our blood components.

Researchers from the University of California, San Francisco also discovered a previously unknown pool of blood stem cells that makes this happen inside the lung tissue — cells that were incorrectly assumed to mainly reside in bone marrow.

"This finding definitely suggests a more sophisticated view of the lungs — that they're not just for respiration, but also a key partner in formation of crucial aspects of the blood," says one of the researchers, Mark R. Looney.

Submission + - Call for the security of the Electronic Voting Machine (EVM) to be tested

An anonymous reader writes: The IT minister of the Indian state of Karnataka has called for a hackathon for testing the electronic voting machines (EVMs) used in the recent elections in India.

In the elections in the Indian state of Uttar Pradesh, BJP, the party which is presently in power in the centre, won with a huge majority. Some from the opposition parties have argued that the EVMs may have been tampered with.

Narendra Modi, the present Prime Minister of India, was accused of using non-authoirzed EVMs in 2010 during the local elections in the state of Gujarat while he was a chief minister there. The EVMs were shown to be giving incorrect results.

In an earlier research done in 2010 by researchers from NetIndia, University of Michigan and a non-profit in Netherlands specializing in electronic voting related issues, the security of the electronic voting machines was found to be inadequate.

Comment More tips for browser makers (Score 5, Informative) 107

(... because I'm sure they read /. and value my opinion... )

1. NEVER hide ANY part of the URL. If the URL extends beyond the size of the location box, give a nice big '...' for people to click on to see it.

2. ALWAYS show a status bar that ALWAYS shows what URL I'll go to if I click a link. NEVER allow ANYTHING to change this behavior.

3. NEVER hide the protocol.

4. Don't allow 'data' URIs in the URL bar by default. https://www.wordfence.com/blog... (This also relates to #1)

5. Don't make SUCH a big damn deal about 'https' -- big green text, giant padlock icons, etc. I've been telling people for YEARS that an HTTPS connection to bankofamurica.ru is worth NOTHING.

This won't solve everything, but the least that browser makers can do is give people the tools they need to help them make good decisions. Long story short, QUIT HIDING SHIT!

6. Bonus: enough with all these new shit TLDs. Is a world where http://blog.google/ exists (note: it does) REALLY a better place than one where it doesn't? Or is it just more confusing?

Submission + - Windows 10 forced upgrades spark legal action

AmiMoJo writes: Three people in Illinois have filed a lawsuit against Microsoft, claiming that its Windows 10 update destroyed their data and damaged their computers. The complaint, filed in Chicago's US District Court on Thursday, charges that Microsoft Windows 10 is a defective product and that its maker failed to provide adequate warning about the potential risks posed by Windows 10 installation – specifically system stability and data loss. The attorneys representing the trio are seeking to have the case certified as a class action that includes every person in the US who upgraded to Windows 10 from Windows 7 and suffered data loss or damage to software or hardware within 30 days of installation. They claim there are hundreds or thousands of affected individuals. Last June, a California woman won $10,000 after a Windows 10 update disabled her PC.

Submission + - Microsoft Posts 'No Boys Allowed' Signs at State of RI High School CS Event 4

theodp writes: "Girls and women are half of the world's population," Rhode Island Governor Gina Raimondo told hundreds of high school girls gathered behind doors with signs that read "[Microsoft] DigiGirlz: No Boys Allowed". "They are half of the world’s brains, problem-solvers, leaders. This world cannot solve problems unless they are at the table. That’s why I started programs like CS4RI, partnering with Microsoft and other leaders [including Microsoft-backed Code.org] to offer computer science in every Rhode Island school." Raimondo also noted she was dismayed to learn that only 12 of Rhode Island's 42 students who took the AP Computer Science test were girls (RI has 43,000+ enrolled HS students). The best way to make girls feel welcome in K-12 CS education, some influence-wielding tech giants, politicians, and educators seem to agree, is by making boys even more unwelcome via things like gender-based federal K-12 CS education funding; girls-only learn-to-code initiatives, STEM schools and summer computer camps; and gender-weighted teacher incentive programs from Google and tech-backed Code.org (Google and the U.S. Government even sought to exclude boys from programming White House Christmas tree lights in 2014).

Submission + - Why You Should Care About The Supreme Court Case On Toner Cartridges (consumerist.com)

rmdingler writes: A corporate squabble over printer toner cartridges doesn’t sound particularly glamorous, and the phrase “patent exhaustion” is probably already causing your eyes to glaze over. However, these otherwise boring topics are the crux of a Supreme Court case that will answer a question with far-reaching impact for all consumers: Can a company that sold you something use its patent on that product to control how you choose to use after you buy it?

Here’s the background: Lexmark makes printers. Printers need toner in order to print, and Lexmark also happens to sell toner.

Then there’s Impression Products, a third-party company makes and refills toner cartridges for use in printers, including Lexmark’s.

Comment Loss of control (Score 1) 250

When your entire revenue is dependent on quantity with minimal quality investment you lose control. When you lose control things go down hill fast (just see what MySpace and Geocities eventually became). And there is currently no AI that can discriminate between poetry, let alone what certain markets find offensive.

From the other end: Although I don't understand why a potential advertiser would not want to promote their product in front of any audience. These types of things are bound to happen when you depend on a single vendor serving an entire market spanning pretty much every human endeavor, you're bound to be servicing both the best and worst parts.

Ad companies and YouTube channels alike need to turn to smaller, controllable and direct revenue models. If you make a private deal with an ad company both sides get what they want. Now the revenue is just being distributed to primarily the worst portions of society and decent content which is a minority of the 400h/min streams only gets a stupidly small share.

Submission + - EFF needs your help to stop Congress dismantling Internet privacy protections! (eff.org)

Peter Eckersley writes: Last year the FCC passed rules forbidding ISPs (both mobile and landline) from using your personal data without your consent for purposes other than providing you Internet access. In other words, the rules prevent ISPs from turning your browsing history into a revenue stream to sell to marketers and advertisers. Unfortunately, members of Congress are scheming to dismantle those protections as early as this week. If they succeed, ISPs would be free to resume selling users' browsing histories, pre-loading phones with spyware, and generally doing all sorts of creepy things to your traffic.

The good news is, we can stop them. We especially need folks in the key states of Alaska, Colorado, Maine, Montana, Nevada, Ohio, and Pennsylvania to call their senators this week and tell them not to kill the FCC's Broadband Privacy Rules.

Together, we can stop Congress from undermining these crucial privacy protections.

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