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Submission + - Cesarean births *possibly* affecting human evolution 1

CanadianRealist writes: Larger babies delivered by cesarean section may be affecting human evolution. Researchers estimate cases where the baby cannot fit down the birth canal have increased from 30 in 1,000 in the 1960s to 36 in 1,000 births today. (Science Alert and ( BBC "this is happening headline" version.)

More detailed studies would be required to actually confirm the link between C-sections and evolution, as all we have now is a hypothesis based on the birth data.

Agreed, more studies required part. Cesareans may simply be becoming more common with “too large” defined as cesarean seems like a better idea. It's reasonable to pose the question based simply on an understanding of evolution. Like it's reasonable to conjecture that length of human pregnancy is a compromise between further development in utero, and chance of mother and baby surviving the delivery.

Submission + - Al Gore has "an extremely interesting conversation" with Trump (bbc.com)

tomhath writes: Mr Gore told reporters he met Ivanka before his meeting with her father.

"The bulk of the time was with the president-elect, Donald Trump. I found it an extremely interesting conversation, and to be continued," Mr Gore said.

Mr Trump has been stocking his administration with conservative ideologues, and many of the possible names for his environmental posts are sceptical of current policy. If Ms Trump pushes the issue and Mr Gore continues his "extremely interesting conversation" with the president, however, this could become a test of how willing President Trump is to cross party orthodoxy.

A free-agent president — beholden to neither party and willing to strike deals according to his own fancy — may be exactly what his voters wanted and what Washington insiders fear.

Submission + - What To Do If You Need To Learn To Code To Keep Your Job (backchannel.com)

mirandakatz writes: Karen Wickre has survived the highs and lows of Silicon Valley’s kingmakers, working everywhere from Twitter to Google, and now, she's taking her years of workplace savvy and applying it to her new gig as Backchannel's advice columnist. In this edition of the Help Desk: what to do if you're being told you need to learn to code to keep your job; how to handle being leveled down; and what to do when your manager is taking all of the credit for your entire team's work.

Submission + - Ask Slashdot: Where did member ~KGIII (973947) Go ??? (slashdot.org)

Bob_Who writes: KGIII (973947) last posted a comment on Slashdot on May 11, 2016.

Since that time, I have no clue whatsoever why KGIII (or the alias) has completely disappeared.

Does anyone have any idea if KGIII is alive??

Or in the big house? ....or looking down from the even bigger house ..... or has simply quit Slashdot and never looked back???

Its been a long while without a peep from profoundly lucid participant.

Anyone near Maine or Cuba or other place where KGIII may be lurking perhaps? I've been worried for months...

Submission + - Apple Pay arrives in Spain, But it isn't good news for everyone (medium.com)

dkatana writes: Spain is the fourth European country (after the UK, France and Switzerland), and the second in the Euro Zone, to get Apple Pay.

Apple has teamed up with Banco Santander and American Express to introduce their popular payment app, just in time for the holidays.

But not everyone is happy. Other banks will be under pressure to join the service, for which Apple charges a hefty setup fee, and then 15 basis points per transaction, which will have to come from merchants' processing fees.

That is why Apple Pay is not available everywhere in Europe. The European Central Bank (ECB) is pushing for lower interchange fees to boost electronic payments, and banks can't pay Apple without losing money.

Submission + - Virginia spent over half a million on cell surveillance that mostly doesn't work (muckrock.com)

v3rgEz writes: In 2014, the Virginia State Police spent $585,265 on a specially modified Suburban outfitted with the latest and greatest in cell phone surveillance: The DRT 1183C, affectionately known as the DRTbox. But according to logs uncovered by public records website MuckRock, the pricey ride was only used 12 times — and only worked 7 of those times. Read the full DRTbox documents at MuckRock.

Submission + - Social media is not your friend

Presto Vivace writes: Of 8 Tech Companies, Only Twitter Says It Would Refuse to Help Build Muslim Registry for Trump

The Intercept contacted nine of the most prominent such firms, from Facebook to Booz Allen Hamilton, to ask if they would sell their services to help create a national Muslim registry, an idea recently resurfaced by Donald Trump’s transition team. Only Twitter said no.

Submission + - China abandons banning the bomb? (slashdot.org)

Dan Drollette writes: The United States and Russia are not only failing to disarm—they are pursuing policies that threaten a dangerous and destabilizing resumption of the nuclear arms race.

Submission + - AMD Zen SR7 CPU Allegedly Will Offer Core i7 5960X Performance At Half The Price (hothardware.com)

MojoKid writes: AMD needs a win in the high-end processor category badly and if the latest leak turns out to be accurate, AMD could get its much needed victory when its unreleased Zen SR7 processor hits the market sometime in Q1 with eight cores in tow. The octal-core Zen part is said to perform better than Intel's muscular Core i7-5960X, a Haswell-E chip with eight cores clocked at 3GHz to 3.5GHz, 16 threads, and 20MB of cache. Not for the faint of wallet, the Core i7-5960X tops $1,000 in street pricing even when it's on sale. AMD's competing SR7 Summit Ridge part is said to cost half as much at $499. New engineering samples of the potentially game changing Zen chip have been popping up in the wild. These latest revisions feature a 3.2GHz core clockspeed and 3.5GHz turbo frequency. These are noticeable jumps in frequency compared to the previous version AMD showed, which had the core and turbo clockspeeds running at 2.8GHz and 3.2GHz, respectively.

Submission + - Wikileaks Reveals how NSA Analysts Earned "XKS Skilz points" by Spying (wikileaks.org)

Xenographic writes: Wikileaks has recently released 90 gigabytes of information relating to the German parliamentary inquiry into the surveillance activities of Germany's foreign intelligence agency Bundesnachrichtendienst (BND) and its cooperation with the United States' National Security Agency (NSA). One of these is related to the gamification of XKeyscore (XKS), which is the NSA's program for searching and analyzing global Internet data. According to this PDF document, analysts could earn "XKS Skilz points" for spying:

"Combine these exciting finds with the introduction of XKS Skilz points, and you can see why McDonald's teamed up with Monopoly years ago: people buy more and even super size their orders just to get game pieces. With the brainchild of Skilz, where analysts can earn points and unlock achievements for performing tasks in XKS, people are willing to try new things within the tool. Analysts think to themselves, "Using the Pivot Data feature will earn 30 points... I'm going to try it and see what happens." Discovery! Points! We have been lured by our geeky desire to unlock achievements and earn points, and bragging rights are everything."

Submission + - Apparently the NSA whistleblowers failed to disclose the NSA space capability (obamasweapon.com)

strstr writes: NSA space capability is actively being used by local law enforcement agencies today to perform magnetic resonance imaging, electron spin resonance, RADAR, and quantum entanglement scans of our homes, bodies, and brains enabling tracking, memory and thought monitoring, including password and encryption code interception. NSA whistleblower Todd Giffen along with other interesting parties have made the leaks, and dumped the patents behind the technology on obamasweapon.com. This is the same technology used on Saddam Hussein during the Gulf war classified as psychotronics and biocommunications, which was reported by USA Today and the Iraqi newspaper Babel to have caused a blood clot in his brain or heart, normally undetectable to be man-caused. NSA whistleblower Todd Giffen is actively being scanned, irradiated, and no touch tortured with the technology on US soil by law enforcement and intelligence agencies, which is deployed across the United States to target and hit all citizens as they please. Dr. Robert Duncan AB, SM, MBA PhD Harvard graduate CIA/DOD/US DOJ/NASA engineer and system architect backs Todd Giffen up as a victim of ruthless people and software on his website drrobertduncan.com. Will someone help? SOS.

Submission + - Backdoor encryption sneaks into UK law (theregister.co.uk)

Coisiche writes: Seems that all the US companies that said any encryption backdoors would undermine global competitiveness, when such a thing was recently mooted there, can now find out if they were correct or not by watching the UK. Meanwhile various TLA agencies will be wondering if it could be as easily slipped into law in their jurisdiction.

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