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KDE 3.5.4 Released 65

Carewolf writes "While KDE4 is pushing ahead the stable KDE 3.5 branch is also seeing quite some development and new features. Today KDE 3.5.4 was released, with improved removable device support, speed optimization and many bug fixes. Among the bug fixes is of course a fix to layout the new slashdot sidebar properly in Konqueror. The story is also carried on The Dot."
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KDE 3.5.4 Released

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  • by halivar ( 535827 ) <bfelger.gmail@com> on Thursday August 03, 2006 @08:22AM (#15839000)
    KDE will be the perfect desktop for me when I don't have to include all the extra cruft. I love the UI and basic apps, and I like select apps from each package, but the vast majority of it is a waste of space for me.

    That said, I'm still emerging it today.
    • That said, I'm still emerging it today.
      You might emerge it today, but it will be done sometime next week. :-)
    • > KDE will be the perfect desktop for me when I don't have to include all the extra cruft.
      > I love the UI and basic apps, and I like select apps from each package, but the vast
      > majority of it is a waste of space for me.

      With todays large harddisks this is hardly any problem, and not worth the package maintainers
      time to split the packages into even more packages.

      > That said, I'm still emerging it today.

      If you are so concerned with waste of space, why do you build KDE
      and dependant libraries by you
      • With todays large harddisks this is hardly any problem, and not worth the package maintainers time to split the packages into even more packages.

        Not many people care about disk space. But do you really want to download and compile a whole collection of packages whenever a tiny bug is fixed anywhere in that collection?

        I only use KWordQuiz from the KDE Education collection. That's ~500KB. I don't want to download and compile ~30MB of source whenever a bug is fixed in any of the applications in th

        • This is how debian based distros have done kde since at least 2.x and I think since kde 1.x. Right now for example on debian/ubuntu etc you could just do apt-get install kwordquiz and it would just install the package and the base requirements for it, not all the rest of the packaged in kdeedu. The issue you are having is not a kde problem. I don't know what distro you are using that does things that way but most of the ones I am familiar with have had kde broken up fairly fine grained for a long time now.
          • The issue you are having is not a kde problem.

            It's not me that's having the issue, I'm merely responding to somebody that was saying that having everything lumped into one big package is fine because everybody has lots of disk space.

            • You are overstating the size of KDE packages, relatively speaking. Most of
              the packages have various options (like KDE using Samba or CUPS) to
              help third party dependencies.

              Another poster wrote that Gentoo have split up the official KDE packages into
              individual applications, really, I would not maintain such packages, but hey,
              it's not me to decide their time spending ;-)

              But people that complain about KDE size and them does an "emerge" does not
              get much sympathy from me....
        • > Not many people care about disk space. But do you really want to download and compile a whole collection of packages whenever a tiny bug is fixed anywhere in that collection?

          Why not use the precompiled packages made by your favourite *BSD or Linux
          package maintainer when they are available?

      • > With todays large harddisks this is hardly any problem, and not worth the package maintainers
        > time to split the packages into even more packages.

        They already are ...

        http://www.gentoo.org/doc/en/kde-split-ebuilds.xml [gentoo.org]
    • Seeing as you say you will be "emerging it today" I will presume you are using Gentoo, in which case you can use the modular packages instead of the monolithic ones. Just chose the select apps you want to install and leave the rest. Of course, the hard part is knowing which apps to install but going with basic desktop + what you can think of and then adding things as you realise you need/want them. See here [gentoo.org] for more information, it is a little old but probably still accurate.
      • In fact, you can see everything that the full-blown KDE would install by typing in "emerge -pv kde-meta." It's well north of 100 packages, and all you need to just run KDE apps is kdebase and kdelibs plus whatever KDE app you want (just emerge it by name.) I start off by installing kde-meta to get all of the KDE apps as individual packages and then uninstall what I do not want later by unmerging it by name. Works liks a charm and is easy, even if it does take a little longer to install and then remove. Note
    • Well... I don't think this is KDE's fault. It's the fault of your particular Linux distro. KDE is very modular so you can go to their site install say three or four modules (kdebase,kdelibs etc) and be done with it. So, for example when i am installing it via SuSe (my O.S of choice) the 'minimal KDE system' includes many unnecessary modules. I'd blame suse for this.
    • So basically, all you need to get the perfect desktop is to switch to a distribution that splits the KDE modules into separate application packages?
    • You can do that...
      Look at the kde-meta ebuilds, they split kde up into all of it's constituent apps, so you can emerge konqueror seperately etc...
      If you emerge kde-meta, you get the entire of kde, but as seperate packages so you can remove unwanted ones later.
    • So upgrade to a 10GB HDD and don't fret. I could see worrying about KDE's (or gtk's) massive memory footprint, but who cares about HDD space anymore?
      • KDE 3.5.3 on a 32-bit machine with an average amount of startup and auto-startup services (nfs, samba, distcc client, ntp client, gkrellm2) the RAM usage is 85 MB. Granted that may be a bit much for somebody running a computer that can only take 64 or 128MB RAM, but you'd need to have a original Socket 7-era unit to be constrained by this as the Super 7s and Slot 1/Slot A machines generally take 256MB or more.And I'd be more worried about a Pentium 75 keeping up with running modern applications that I would
        • If you are running such a machine as your primary box, you can easily find machines much more powerful (Pentium III/Athlon 700-1GHz or early P4s) just being trashed as newer units replace them. Pick one of those up for little to no money and then you can buy a little RAM and run KDE.For example, my university is ditching a lot of PIII/866 machines with 256 or 512MB RAM for roughly $50-75.

          Try to actually do something, and in my general experience, anything under 512MB of RAM is unacceptable[1].

          And by "someth

          • I totally agree- 512MB is the minimum for a 32-bit box and 1GB for a 64-bit box to have good performance. My boxes have twice that. I was more saying that you can have usable (i.e. not swapping too too much) performance on 256MB or so. And a lot of the lag in browsing directories is due to the HDD, not the RAM or CPU (unless you have VERY little RAM or a very slow chip that can't draw the window quickly.)
  • Argh... (Score:1, Offtopic)

    by Klaidas ( 981300 )
    * 2006-08-02 13:55:29 KDE 3.5.4 Released (Linux,KDE) (rejected)
    Summary:
    * rejected (1)

    Oh well
  • ...it shows up in pkgsrc [pkgsrc.org]? I might actually get a chance to check it out this year. (boy am I glad I don't use debian any more!)
    • ...it shows up in pkgsrc [pkgsrc.org]? I might actually get a chance to check it out this year. (boy am I glad I don't use debian any more!)

      I hate to disappoint you, but I just installed KDE 3.5.4-2 from the offical Debian "Sid" repositories last night. It would seem that your complaint against Debian's package management is unfounded, at least for the desktop-oriented releases. Perhaps you were trying to run a desktop system out of the "stable" (server-oriented) repository? "Testing" and "unstable" are

      • And running on Sid is a fun way to learn how to fix a broken system. I seem to recall my first major problem I couldn't fix when Sid upgraded X.org from 6.9 to 7.0 (bug with X11R7 and kwin or something). Be careful with a Sid system as you might end up reinstalling crap a few times a year (make regular backups to prevent the hassle).
        • And running on Sid is a fun way to learn how to fix a broken system. I seem to recall my first major problem I couldn't fix when Sid upgraded X.org from 6.9 to 7.0 (bug with X11R7 and kwin or something). Be careful with a Sid system as you might end up reinstalling crap a few times a year (make regular backups to prevent the hassle).

          Perhaps that's true for some systems. I wouldn't know, since I've been running (more or less) my current installation without incident from Sid for four or five years now, w

    • What's with not using Debian? I'm using Kanotix>Debian and I've been enjoying KDE 3.5.4 since shortly after it hit the servers last weekend!
  • by Ant P. ( 974313 ) on Thursday August 03, 2006 @08:42AM (#15839123) Homepage
    Compared to Firefox where users have to wait until next year or put up with half-working CVS builds if they want rendering bugs fixed. If KHTML had better user CSS support I'd switch right now.
    • by Bogtha ( 906264 ) on Thursday August 03, 2006 @08:55AM (#15839219)

      If KHTML had better user CSS support I'd switch right now.

      What do you mean? Konqueror has had good user stylesheet support for years. Settings | Configure Konqueror | Stylesheets. You can specify your own user stylesheet, or there's a dialog box to set up a new stylesheet in a user-friendly manner.

      Speaking of CSS, this new version has improved support for various parts of CSS 3. In particular, as far as I know, no other browser has implemented the CSS 3 replaced content model yet, which is one thing that can singlehandedly wipe out massive amounts of unnecessary HTML and JavaScript for things like rounded corners, image replacement, etc.

    • by Rob Kaper ( 5960 ) on Thursday August 03, 2006 @09:09AM (#15839329) Homepage
      Konqueror's CSS support annoys me maybe 1% of the time I am serving. Firefox's lack of desktop integration annoys me constantly.

      Seriously. Once you get used to directly dropping files from an obex:/ Bluetooth folder to an sftp:/ folder, or from an audiocd:/ Compact Disc to a Samba share.. you'll never want to go back. Ever.
      • You forgot... (Score:3, Informative)

        by swillden ( 191260 ) *

        ... fish:/

        If you work with a bunch of Unixish boxes like I do (mostly Linux, but with some Solaris, Mac OS X, etc.) the fish:/ kioslave is the best thing since sliced bread.

        For those who don't know about it, if you type fish://hostname in konqueror's location bar, it opens a file browser on your home directory on the referenced machine. The implementation uses SSH plus common Unix command line utilities like 'ls', so it works with any remote host running an SSH server with the basic utilities.

        Even be

        • Re:You forgot... (Score:3, Informative)

          by WindBourne ( 631190 )
          Generally if you have fish, then you can use sftp. sftp is faster and more reliable. But if sftp is disabled, then fish is a good fall-back.
        • What's this whole "best thing since sliced bread" thing? Sliced bread is absolutely minging -- it's like some sort of packing material! Give me an unsliced loaf, cobs or a baguette, anyday.

          Get yourself a breadmaker. I can recommend Panasonic -- I've had mine four years and it's still going strong. A sachet of instant dried yeast, strong flour (2 parts white to 1 part wholemeal; too much wholemeal has trouble rising, even on the dedicated slow wholemeal programme, whereas too little lacks flavour), 3
      • Konqueror's CSS support annoys me maybe 1% of the time I am serving. Firefox's lack of desktop integration annoys me constantly.

        Seriously. Once you get used to directly dropping files from an obex:/ Bluetooth folder to an sftp:/ folder, or from an audiocd:/ Compact Disc to a Samba share.. you'll never want to go back. Ever.

        Yep. Also, the lack of KWallet support is highly irritating (to me, anyway). What good is a centralized secure password storage system if the application that most frequently need

    • by Anonymous Coward
      KHTML along with WebCore which is based off of it, both pass the ACID2 test and have for a while now while Firefox 2.0 still doesn't.
    • I use KDE all the time. Konqi works great for most sites. Where I run into trouble, I switch to firefox. All good.
  • kde mirrors (Score:2, Informative)

    by FudRucker ( 866063 )
    have a great build for Slackware, runs great in my stock slackware-10.2
  • by Anonymous Coward on Thursday August 03, 2006 @09:43AM (#15839633)
    For years I had been a GNOME user. And for most of that time, I was quite proud and quite happy. But I was also quite ignorant. It was about a week ago that I switched from Fedora Core to Kubuntu. In retrospect, it is a change I wish I had made much sooner.

    Besides the fact that Kubuntu as a whole is far more stable than Fedora Core, it should also be noted that Kubuntu includes a highly-integrated distribution of KDE. I was somewhat skeptical at first about the change. After all, GNOME had been working for for me (or so I thought) for years. It allowed me to get my work done in a timely manner. But for the sake of exploration, I decided to make use of KDE. And what a grand decision that was!

    It soon became apparent to me that KDE is of a higher quality design and implementation than GNOME. I'm not suggesting that the GNOME developers are incompetent or lousy programmers. It seems to be more a case of KDE using the right tools for the right job: they use C++ directly, rather than trying to craft their own unnatural OO subsystem and framework in pure C as is done by GNOME. Second, I found that Qt was a far faster, more responsive toolkit than GTK+. Windows would redraw faster, and in general the GUI felt far more responsive.

    I also find the KDE applications to be superior to their GNOME equivalents. The Kate text editor offers more functionality than that of gedit, while also feeling far more responsive on the same hardware, and consuming far fewer resources. Konqueror is another major success story. It renders much quicker than Gecko, and thus is a much more enjoyable browser to use than Firefox, Galeon2, or Epiphany.

    While I have no regrets over the years I spent with GNOME, I am glad I have switched to KDE. What was a very enjoyable experience with desktop Linux using GNOME has become a completely fantastic one now that I'm using KDE. My productivity has skyrocketed, too. What would take me an hour to do with GNOME tools, I can often get done in 45 minutes while using KDE. Overall, it's been a very remarkable experience switching to KDE. It's something I recommend for all Linux and UNIX users to do.

    • (note: gnome-user) Wow, I had the opposite experience... I decided to try out Kde, and wam.. got hit with a slow are unresponsive desktop, on really good hardware, I had konsole output much slower that gnome-terminal, and generally everything about Kde seemed like they packed a lot of eye-candy are eye candy apps together into one giant monolith lump of programming. Then again that was fedora core 3, I should try again in kubuntu now. In fact, right now note2: actual experience, not troll.
      • by Anonymous Coward
        RedHat (or FC) has never had a good reputation about the quality of its KDE packages; some say their poor KDE support was a conscious politics-driven decision. I don't know about that, but it's true that you don't seem to read KDE success stories from FC users. If you want to try KDE, why not pick a KDE-friendly distribution such as Kubuntu, as the OP did.
    • First, who cares. Second, if indeed you were happy with Gnome when using it with Fedora, why did you choose to use Kubuntu instead of Ubuntu which is well known to use Gnome as it's default desktop environment. This is just a jab at Gnome masked in such a way to get an 'insightful' mod.
    • Just wait till you discover Amarok and K3B, both of which are simply the best applications of their type available, bar none.
  • by jZnat ( 793348 ) * on Thursday August 03, 2006 @09:55AM (#15839735) Homepage Journal
    Whatever you do, don't upgrade yet! Not only is there a severe bug in k-d-s, but several other programs are unstable and cranky. Stick with 3.5.2 or 3.5.3. Check #kubuntu [irc] for updates on the matter. Seriously though, don't do what I did and have to deal with the pain of downgrading packages via apt. :(
    • Use aptitude (Score:2, Informative)

      by Anonymous Coward
      Aptitude makes downgrading lots of packages much less painful.
    • Is this just a Kubuntu bug or does it affect all KDE 3.5.4 packages? I run Gentoo and the ebuilds seem fine to me- so far...

      Well, there is always TWM if KDE craps out :D Real men and women aren't afraid to use little more than a CLI.

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