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The Internet

Fraud Museum Showcases Web Scams 106

mashy writes "CNN is running a story about AdCops, an internet ad fraud patrol group, who recently opened a museum of internet scams. Its mission is to educate its members of the latest scams, but its $99 membership fee may make it an unpopular choice with so many similar services already available for free." By the way, if anyone needs to MAKE MONEY FAST, just lemme know I have tons of easy ways to do it in my spam folder ;)
This discussion has been archived. No new comments can be posted.

Fraud Museum Showcases Web Scams

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  • "Its mission is to educate its members of the latest scams, but its $99 membership fee may make it an unpopular choice with so many similar services already available for free."

    Like which ones? This would be neat--but only if they have sarcastic comments like Consumer Reports does.
    --
    Non-meta-modded "Overrated" mods are killing Slashdot
  • send me $50 cash in the mail (to my po box) and i'll describe to you how these scam artists work.
  • by SpanishInquisition ( 127269 ) on Tuesday February 27, 2001 @09:09AM (#398196) Homepage Journal
    Pay $99 and you learn all about not giving away your money to web scams?
    --
  • by gattaca ( 27954 ) on Tuesday February 27, 2001 @09:09AM (#398197)
    I hope they can handle recursion or the site won't be complete.
  • If i want to lookup common net scams, i'll go to a virus database and find the "virus hoaxes" area. Watch, they also give you money for refering new members to this wonderful membership plan. I can see it now: join and be showcased as part of the biggest scam in our museum, the museum itself!
  • They're out to beat scams...

    $99 sounds like a scam to me!

  • Nobody else sees the irony here? Giving away $99 to avoid being fleeced?

    Man, the people who built this thing must be rolling in the aisles...
  • anyone been jailed yet? fraudsters i mean not hackers
  • by ave19 ( 149657 ) on Tuesday February 27, 2001 @09:12AM (#398202)
    "Step right up! Step right up! See the latest in WEB SCAMS! Don't walk around unprepared to deal with the latest threats! Warn your friends! Warn your family! Just ninety-nine bucks! A small price to pay when you could lose thousands!!!"

    "Okay, mister, I'll look. Here's $99."

    "Thank you, son, you won't regret it. Step right through that door."

    Inside is a mirror with a sign above it that says: "SUCKER!"

  • Ever feel like you're being watched while you 'surf' the Internet??? Chances are, YOU ARE! There wasn't anything you could do about it, UNTIL NOW!!

    Just visit this website [adcops.com] and find out NOW! The cost is $99, but isn't that a PITTANCE compared to your peace of mind ?

    Dancin Spammer
  • a scam to me...

    send us $99 to find out what scams are out there to avoid!

    hell send me 5 bucks and ill tell ya a bunch!!!

  • Start a 'business-to-business membership consortium''to report Internet fraud' and charge $99 for membership.
  • Their web server must be having trouble with all the eloop's it must be encountering :-)
  • Unfortunately, I probably won't be able to get this e-mail past the lameness filter. However, I feel a duty to my fellow slashdotters to show them this letter in its original form, as it is one of the best examples of an Internet scam, and a fairly funny one at that.

    My only hypotheses here are that these people are engaged in some sort of money laundering or direct marketing scam, and I don't know which would be worse.
    ----------
    CONTACT)

    TELEFAX: 234-42-254548

    ATTN: SIR,

    I HAVE THE COURAGE TO ASK YOU TO LOOK FOR A RELIABLE
    AND HONEST PERSON WHO WILL BE CAPABLE FOR THIS
    IMPORTANT BUSINESS BELIEVING THAT YOU WILL NEVER LET
    ME DOWN EITHER NOW OR IN FUTURE.

    I AM MR RANK SIDNEY,THE EASTERN DISTRICT BANK
    MANAGER OF UNITED BANK FOR AFRICA PLC. (UBA). THERE IS
    AN ACCOUNT OPENED IN THIS BANK IN 1980 AND SINCE 1990
    NOBODY HAS OPERATED ON THIS ACCOUNT AGAIN. AFTER GOING
    THROUGH SOME OLD FILES IN THE RECORDS I DISCOVERED
    THAT IF I DO NOT REMITT THIS MONEY OUT URGENTLY IT
    WILL BE FORFEITED FOR NOTHING.

    THE OWNER OF THIS ACCOUNT IS MR. SMITH B. ANDREAS, A
    FOREIGNER, AND THE MANAGER OF PETRO TECHNICAL
    SUPPORT SERVICES, A CHEMICAL ENGINEER BY PROFESSION
    AND HE DIED SINCE 1990. NO OTHER PERSON KNOWS ABOUT
    THIS ACCOUNT OR ANY THING CONCERNING IT, THE ACCOUNT
    HAS NO OTHER BENEFICIARY AND MY INVESTIGATION PROVED
    TO ME AS WELL THAT THIS COMPANY DOES NOT KNOW ANYTHING
    ABOUT THIS ACCOUNT AND THE AMOUNT INVOLVED IS (USD 26
    MILLION DOLLARS). I WANT TO TRANSFER THIS MONEY INTO A
    SAFE FOREIGNERS ACCOUNT ABROAD BUT I DONT KNOW ANY
    FOREIGNER, I AM ONLY CONTACTING YOU AS A FOREIGNER
    BECAUSE THIS MONEY CAN NOT BE APPROVED TO A LOCAL BANK
    HERE, BUT CAN ONLY BE APPROVED TO ANY FOREIGN ACCOUNT
    BECAUSE THE MONEY IS IN US DOLLARS AND THE FORMER
    OWNER OF THE ACCOUNT IS MR. SMITH B. ANDREAS IS A
    FOREIGNER TOO. I KNOW THAT THIS MASSAGE WILL COME TO
    YOU AS A SURPRISE AS WE DONT KNOW OUR SELVES BEFORE,
    BUT BE SURE THAT IT IS REAL AND A GENUINE BUSINESS. I
    ONLY GOT YOUR CONTACT ADDRESS FROM THE COMPUTER ,WITH
    BELIEVE IN GOD THAT YOU WILL NEVER LET ME DOWN IN THIS
    BUSINESS YOU ARE THE ONLY PERSON THAT I HAVE CONTACTED
    IN THIS BUSINESS, SO PLEASE REPLY URGENTLY SO THAT I
    WILL INFORM YOU THE NEXT STEP TO TAKE URGENTLY.

    I WANT US TO SEE FACE TO FACE OR SIGN A BINDING
    AGREEMENT TO BIND US TOGETHER SO THAT YOU CAN RECIEVE
    THIS MONEY INTO A FORIEGN ACCOUNT OR ANY ACCOUNT OF
    YOUR CHOICE WHERE THE FUND WILL BE REMMITTED.AND I
    WILL FLY TO YOUR COUNTRY FOR WITHDRAWAL AND SHARING
    AND OTHER INVESTMENTS.

    I AM CONTACTING YOU BECAUSE OF THE NEED TO INVOLVE A
    FOREIGNER WITH FOREIGN ACCOUNT AND FOREIGN
    BENEFICIARY. I NEED YOUR CO-OPERATION TO MAKE THIS
    WORK FINE. BECAUSE THE MANAGEMENT IS READY TO APPROVE
    THIS PAYMENT TO ANY FOREIGNER WHO HAS CORRECT
    INFORMATION OF THIS ACCOUNT, WHICH I WILL GIVE TO YOU
    LATER IMMEDIATELY, IF YOU ARE ABLE AND WITH CAPABILITY
    TO HANDLE SUCH AMOUNT IN STRICT CONFIDENCE AND TRUST
    ACCORDING TO MY INSTRUCTIONS AND ADVICE FOR OUR MUTUAL
    BENEFIT BECAUSE THIS OPPORTUNITY WILL NEVER COME AGAIN
    IN MY LIFE. A NEED TRUTHFUL PERSON IN THIS BUSINESS
    BECAUSE I DONT WANT TO MAKE MISTAKE I NEED YOUR
    STRONG ASSURANCE AND TRUST.

    WITH MY POSITION NOW IN THE OFFICE I CAN TRANSFER THIS
    MONEY TO ANY FOREIGNERS RELIABLE ACCOUNT WHICH YOU CAN
    PROVIDE WITH ASSURANCE THAT THIS MONEY WILL BE INTACT
    PENDING MY PHYSICAL ARRIVAL IN YOUR COUNTRY FOR
    SHARING. I WILL DESTROY ALL DOCUMENTS OF TRANSACTION
    IMMEDIATELY WE RECIEVE THIS MONEY LEAVING NO TRACE TO
    ANY PLACE. YOU CAN ALSO COME TO DISCUSS WITH ME FACE
    TO FACE AFTER WHICH I WILL MAKE THIS REMITTANCE IN
    YOUR PRESENCE AND TWO OF US WILL FLY TO YOUR COUNTRY
    AT LEAST TWO DAYS AHEAD OF THE MONEY GOING INTO YOUR
    ACCOUNT.

    I WILL APPLY FOR ANNUAL LEAVE TO GET VISA IMMEDIATELY
    I HEAR FROM YOU THAT YOU ARE READY TO ACT AND RECEIVE
    THIS FUND IN YOUR ACCOUNT. I WILL USE MY POSITION AND
    INFLUENCE TO EFFECT LEGAL APPROVALS AND ONWARD
    TRANSFER OF THIS MONEY TO YOUR ACCOUNT WITH
    APPROPRIATE CLEARANCE FORMS OF THE MINISTRIES AND
    FOREIGN EXCHANGE DEPARTMENTS.

    AT THE CONCLUSION OF THIS BUSINESS, YOU WILL BE GIVEN
    35% OF THE TOTAL AMOUNT, 60% WILL BE FOR ME, WHILE 5%
    WILL BE FOR EXPENSES BOTH PARTIES MIGHT HAVE INCURED
    DURING THE PROCESS OF TRANSFERING.

    I LOOK FORWARD TO YOUR EARLIEST REPLY BY FAX ONLY.
    TELEFAX LINE: 234-42-254548.

    YOURS TRULY,
    MR RANK SIDNEY
    ----------
    Unfortunately, I probably won't be able to get this e-mail past the lameness filter. However, I feel a duty to my fellow slashdotters to show them this letter in its original form, as it is one of the best examples of an Internet scam, and a fairly funny one at that.

    My only hypotheses here are that these people are engaged in some sort of money laundering or direct marketing scam, and I don't know which would be worse.
    ----------
    Unfortunately, I probably won't be able to get this e-mail past the lameness filter. However, I feel a duty to my fellow slashdotters to show them this letter in its original form, as it is one of the best examples of an Internet scam, and a fairly funny one at that.

    My only hypotheses here are that these people are engaged in some sort of money laundering or direct marketing scam, and I don't know which would be worse.
    ----------
    Unfortunately, I probably won't be able to get this e-mail past the lameness filter. However, I feel a duty to my fellow slashdotters to show them this letter in its original form, as it is one of the best examples of an Internet scam, and a fairly funny one at that.

    My only hypotheses here are that these people are engaged in some sort of money laundering or direct marketing scam, and I don't know which would be worse.
    ----------
    Unfortunately, I probably won't be able to get this e-mail past the lameness filter. However, I feel a duty to my fellow slashdotters to show them this letter in its original form, as it is one of the best examples of an Internet scam, and a fairly funny one at that.

    My only hypotheses here are that these people are engaged in some sort of money laundering or direct marketing scam, and I don't know which would be worse.
  • by DreamingReal ( 216288 ) <.dreamingreal. .at. .yahoo.com.> on Tuesday February 27, 2001 @09:14AM (#398208) Homepage
    Welcome to AdCops!

    The mission of AdCops is to keep our members informed about the latest tricks and tactics used by Internet scammers.

    Lesson #1: Beware of groups asking outrageous membership prices for services other groups offer for free. For example, you paid $99 to joing AdBusters. You are a sucker.

    Lesson #2: Bitter experience is the best teacher.


    -------

  • My ex boyfriend used to be in the fraud business, and I remember that he said once that it is the healthiest sectors of the economy that attract the most fraud. So, although fraud is not a good thing to be encouraged, it is clearly an indicator of success!

    Additionally, I would say that fraud is an essential part of any economy. It makes for a healthy economic ecology. I like having the option of the illegal path - even if it is only an option, it is best if we all have it.

    Temptation is something that is hard to resist of course, so I suppose that is bad. My ex boyfriend gave into temptation, and I am glad that I am not the sort of person who does.

    A healthy economy will always provide temptation and fraud, so lets not be too worried about fraud on the internet, but recohnise it as a sign of health, like a blooming rosebud.

  • You are probably like me. You want HOT WOMEN and BIG MONEY in your pocket RIGHT NOW!!!!!

    I WANT you to MAKE HOT SEX too! If you JOIN OUR BAND of HORNY TEEN SLUTS, you can GET FREE VIAGRA along with your TONER CARTRIDGES in your INBOX!!!!!!

    All it takes is $19.95, and you too will be SWIMMING IT HOT BABES and FREE MONEY!!!!

    You can tell that I'M NOT LYING because I have a lot of EXCLAIMATION POINTS at the end of my SENTENCES!!!!! That makes it REAL!!!!!!

  • by bahtama ( 252146 ) on Tuesday February 27, 2001 @09:16AM (#398211) Homepage
    Homer: But Marge, this isn't like other get rich quick schemes. This one is going to make us rich....And quick!

    =-=-=-=-=

  • by Chuck Flynn ( 265247 ) on Tuesday February 27, 2001 @09:17AM (#398212)
    It sounds like a good idea to show people what to expect so they can learn to avoid it in advance instead of getting hooked themselves. That much is clear.

    Most frauds aren't perpetrated by large-time crooks. The myth of the traveling trickster coming into town and selling the townsfolk on the idea of a highschool marching band hasn't been true since well before the days of Seventy-Six Trombones. Most frauds are perpetrated by small-time crooks who see an opportunity and take it. They're usually not so clever, but they're effective in their sheer numbers.

    If you put all the effective crime schemes in one central repository, won't that make it easier for small-time crooks to find them and start inflicting suffering on society's weak and feeble? Won't this also increase the number of copycat crimes?

    There's a common misconception about fraud victims: that they somewhow deserved what they got, because they were themselves greedy and bought an idea that was too good to be true. But that's just false. No victim is responsible for his own suffering. We all owe each other a duty to prevent victimhood whenever and wherever we find it.

    Fraud victims are usually poor and hopeless. They're the same type who play state-sanctioned lotteries (why we tolerate those, I'll never understand) because they have no other source of hope. They're trying to scrape themselves a living, and along comes a wolf who fleeces them. That's a bad thing. That much is clear.

    Anything that increases the frequency of fraud is a bad thing in my book. Whatever else the benefits may be, I don't think we should tolerate it.
  • ...can be found here [oneill.net].
  • I have a great new site... for only $150 I will take you on a tour of the dumbest membership based web-sites in history.

    Along the way, we'll check out TheMuseumOfMoldyFood.com, AllAboutLint.com, and PicturesOfMyBasement.com...

  • http://british.nerp.net/commentary/alburt.html
  • ...all about Internet scams - they're owned by AOL.

    Asikaa
  • by Isao ( 153092 )
    I think the latest "Make Money Fast" 'net scheme appears to be to open up a web museum on the subject and start charging...
  • by Nidhogg ( 161640 ) <shr,thanatos&gmail,com> on Tuesday February 27, 2001 @09:24AM (#398219) Journal
    www.scambusters.org [scambusters.org]
  • Yeah, I could try out 20 different scams at $5 a pop, maybe even recoup some costs from other idiots I scam, or I could just throw all $99 right down the toilet into a web scam musuem. That makes sense!
  • Its mission is to educate its members of the latest scams

    You mean like the scam where you charge $99 for access to a site full of information that should be free and is probably partially compiled by its users anyway.
  • This one is relatively straightforward.

    You provide him with your bank account routing info (the #s from the bottom of a check) and wait a few days for the big deposit. He makes a big withdrawal instead, and then is gone.

    He's probably overseas (for jurisdictional reasons), but doesn't necessarily have to be.

  • it may sound high, but you just know people are going to pay the fee with stolen credit card numbers. ooh, the irony...
  • thank you, thank you very much
    --
  • Unfortunately your quality has suffered. This is just pathetic.
    --
    Non-meta-modded "Overrated" mods are killing Slashdot
  • "$99 membership fee may make it an unpopular choice with so many similar services already available for free."

    I mean, they arent being serious, right?
  • Inside is a mirror with a sign above it that says: "SUCKER!"

    Or they could mail you a SUCKER! [127.0.0.1] link.

  • That reminds me of an old joke:

    Newpaper boy is hawking papers on the street, yelling, "36 People Swindled!! 36 People Swindled!! Read all about it!!" and this guy comes up and buys a paper, looks at it and say, "I don't see anything in here about people being swindled" and the newsboy starts yelling, "37 People Swindled!! 37 People..."

  • redundant -1
  • by WillSeattle ( 239206 ) on Tuesday February 27, 2001 @09:34AM (#398230) Homepage
    The ones I really like are the fraud spams by people claiming to represent some government agency in Africa, who just need assistance in transferring money out of the country. The great thing about this is the appearance of truth (Africa is unstable), the appeal to greed (the finder's fee), and the whiff of illegality to keep you from passing it on to your local SEC office [sec.gov].

    Me, I just redirect them to the SEC, knowing that not only do they frequently arrest these scoundrels, they use the fines to pay off the national debt.

  • by micromoog ( 206608 ) on Tuesday February 27, 2001 @09:37AM (#398231)
    Besides, [Daniel Clements, president of Ad Cops] adds: "This stuff is already floating around on the Internet anyway," and savvy thieves know where and how to find it.

    Translation: only a seriously defective mind would actually pay us $99 for this rubbish.

  • I don't think you can withdraw money from an account just because you have a bank routing number from a check. Otherwise I could just take any voided check and withdraw large sums of money using that number. I believe you need to present at least some forms of identification or passwords or whatnot.

    I bet that they have a few "issues" with the money transfer and somehow you end up paying $1000 to fix those issues.

    -Ted
  • They're trying to scrape themselves a living, and along comes a wolf who fleeces them.

    Having fallen for a few get-rich scheems in my stupider years, I can honestly say that, while I wasn't proud of having been fleeced, I'm glad it only took me a coat of fur or two, to learn to look for those brown, pointy ears.

    The problem is, though, that the wolves won't stop after they've taken your coat.

    Make no mistake: They're carnivores.

  • You can print up a check with a laser printer, take it to a bank in some 3rd-world place that doesn't have particularly good law enforcement (such as the place the author of the scam alleges he is in), cash the check.

    Yea, do this a bit and problems come back to the bank he's using, but you would not *believe* how lax some Russian banks were before they collapsed. Some countries have good standards, some do not, US banks sometimes extend the benefit of the doubt until they get burned.

    Banks evolve, the Russian collapse helped to take care of that for Russia (in a very expensive way). But there was plenty of private enrichment on the way down.

    Try this at a US bank, or other Western bank, and your but'll be in jail.

  • Or they could link to a page that says:

    ALL YOUR DOLLAR ARE BELONG TO US

    Score: -10, Stupid

  • by -=OmegaMan=- ( 151970 ) on Tuesday February 27, 2001 @09:45AM (#398236)
    Just a preemptive disclaimer, before I get flamed... this IS NOT mine, it was originally written by Bob Rankin

    We've all seen lots of those email warnings and virus alerts, but this one tops them all. So I've decided to pass along this little story I justed concocted - err, I mean just received from a credible source, for your edification. This is not a chain letter! This is not a joke! This is absolutely true! (Yeah, right...)

    --- WARNING, DANGER! ---

    I know this guy whose neighbor, a young man, was home recovering from the trauma of his friend's aunt who took her kids to a Burger King restaurant in a major city and they all got bit by snakes in the ball pit. Anyway, he decided to forget his troubles by having a few stiff drinks at Mulligans, and the the next thing he awoke in a hotel bathtub full of ice and he was sore all over. When he got out of the tub he saw a note on the mirror saying that HIS KIDNEYS HAD BEEN STOLEN by Bill Gates, and he could only get them back by dialing 9-0-# and forwarding 5000 emails to a dying girl at Disney World.

    THIS IS ABSOLUTELY TRUE!!! My uncle's friend heard this story from his neighbor who got it from a guy named Craig Shergold who used to work for the American Cancer Society in a major city.

    Well the poor guy immediately tried to call 911 from a pay phone to report his missing kidneys, but upon reaching into the coin-return slot he got jabbed with an HIV-infected needle around which was wrapped a note that said, "JOIN THE CREW". He was so distraught at this point that he went into the nearest theater and bought a ticket. It was then that he felt a sharp pain in his left shoulder blade. The people behind him got up laughing and tossed a wadded-up paper ball at him as they ran out. When he uncrumpled the paper, it said "WIN A HOLIDAY" and was signed by Jessica Mydek.

    THIS IS NOT A JOKE!!! I have a friend who works next door to the police department of a major city and he heard it from his elderly aunt.

    The poor man, having no kidkeys and infected with a dread disease, stumbled into a nearby Neiman Marcus cafe and ordered a plate of cookies. He asked for the recipe and was told that it would cost "two fifty". When he received his bill, there was a charge for 250 dollars. Furious, he fired up his laptop and sent an email to his lawyer. It was then that he noticed his Palm Pilot was infected by the Budweiser screen saver virus. A "flashing IM" sppeared on his AOL screen, and without thinking, he clicked on it. Instantly, hackers stole his password and began downloading salacious photos of Nina Tottenberg onto his hard drive.

    So anyway the poor guy tried to drive himself to the hospital, but on the way he noticed another car driving along without its lights on. To be helpful, he flashed his lights at him and was promptly shot as part of a gang initiation in a major city. His arm was bleeding badly, but he was able to make it into the mall parking lot. Just at that moment, he saw two guys with black hoods stuffing his wife into a van. Apparently they had told the woman there was a dying baby in the parking lot and asked for her help.

    THIS IS NOT A CHAIN LETTER!!! Please forward this urgent message to every one you can, and spread the news that the Take-A-Bath Foundation will donate a pair of Nike sneakers to everyone at Disney World, but only if you send it to 1000 people. Don't be a thoughtless jerk - it only takes a minute of your time to spread this chain letter, and it could be true!

    ...

    Have a great new year, everyone. Feel free to pass this story (including this paragraph) along to a few friends, and be sure to tell them to sign up for the free TOURBUS newsletter. You can find the REAL story about all of these hoaxes in the TOURBUS archives at http://www.tourbus.com/ . This story is by Bob Rankin Copyright (c) January 1999

  • Bah, you all are shitty fp trolls!! Not even one 'All your base..' or 'Someone set us up the bomb' or Hot Grits or Beowulf Cluster nor any mention at all to Dead Homies. Please get your act together. Bitches.
  • At work, we get these faxes all the time... Almost always from Nigeria. But why would the SEC be interested? And how do they have the means to "frequently arrest" these people? The scams come from overseas where corruption is the norm. And technically, most don't do anything illegal, aside from misrepresenting the source of the fund transfer to you.

    It's rather ingenious, praying on people's greed and utter lack of common sense when a large sum of money is involved.

    --
    dman123 forever!

  • A lot of these scams are pretty scary. One moment you're reading an email a friend sent you (well it started "Dear friend" anyways) and the next you're flat-on-your-ass broke. What can you do? Sure, you could educate yourself about these scams, by paying $99, but that won't stop all of them!

    [gesticulates wildly] Yessir, what you need is Stan's Scam Insurance! For the low low price of only $65 a month we will insure you and your holdings against any internet scam! Cash only, please. Offer not valid on Scabb, Blood, or Phatt island.

  • sick dude... just plain 'ol sick
  • by sharkey ( 16670 ) on Tuesday February 27, 2001 @09:54AM (#398241)
    Big girls and farm sex,
    And chat with a Haitian.
    Lose weight and MMF
    On my spring vacation.

    Insurance and credit cards,
    And prime real estate lands.
    These are a few of my favorite scams!

    OTC!
    Stockgenie!
    HP Toner Sales!
    These are a few of my favorite scams!

    --
  • by gattaca ( 27954 ) on Tuesday February 27, 2001 @09:55AM (#398242)
    I hope they can handle recursion or the site won't be complete.
  • LOL....go to the site, put your mouse over Rewards on the left side, it changes the graphic above to a guy holding out an empty wallet. Now there's truth in advertising!

    Actually, they are implying if you report someone for abusing online advertising, they will pay you 5% of what the site ripped off, course they want to know the "exploit"....hrm...yeah right.

    Going on means going far
    Going far means returning
  • I'm so freaking sick of this pic floating around... damn me and my mindless clicking on links... a word to the the rest of you, don't make my mistake >
  • No no no.

    That's "All Your Bucks Are Belong To Us"

  • Nope. The ISC Security Group is their star attraction.

    --
  • I think this story set a new record for "most posts deserving (-1, Redundant)".

    That being said, people seem to have missed fairly obvious point that this organization seems to be catering to businesses that're particularly susceptible to fraud (banks and credit card companies). In that context, a $99 membership fee is pocket change.

  • Funny, that's been my feeling toward netscape for years...
  • Actually my first version was,

    ALL YOUR BUCK ARE BELONG TO US

    I should have left it that way... :)

  • First of all, country code 234 is Nigeria...big surprise. Second, I think I have seen this exact same one...they all look alike though.

    The basic premise is that you are greedy and will agree to anything, even if it is not exactly like it is stated in the letter. If you set everything up so that you expect a wire transfer in of $26 million and expect to transfer x% of that out, everything is theoretically ok. However, if the deposit is not a wire transfer, but instead a forged/bounced check, that is the problem. Your bank will accept the fake deposit, but they will have to verify it (say it takes 2 business days). When it bounces, you lose that money. Unfortunately, by that time, the money you wire transferred out is gone, and making sure you have the actual money available for a wire transfer is your responsibility. You just can't "cancel" it when you find out the deposit money bounced.

    "But the nice man said the deposit was a wire transfer, not a check," you exclaim. "Tough grits," said the banker.

    "Now give us the $20 million you owe us."

    --
    dman123 forever!

  • Well, whether or not fraud is a sign of a healthy economy, it is certainly a flourishing tax on stupidity. Hey, if you would fax your credit card number to a company that wont provide a valid email address to receive discount prescription drugs -like Viagra, then you deserve whatever you (do or don't) get! (Let's see, I think I'll send access to my bank account to an organization that I've never heard of. The reason for doing this would be because I trust this person to send me pharmaceuticals that are safe!)

    As the saying goes... "Yeah, and I have a bridge to sell you.." Spam has the ability to reach far more suckers than P.T. Barnum ever could.
  • They should list themselves as a scam. the membership fee would be a contender for the 'net's greatest scams...
    don't ya think?

    stainless is as stainless does [usadmc.com]

  • Its mission is to educate its members of the latest scams
    You mean like the scam where you charge $99 for access to a site full of information that should be free and is probably partially compiled by its users anyway.

    And it was so good I decided to post it again
    ---
  • I would say, realizing you've been duped into giving away $99 for information you could have had for free is a very valuble and legitimate lesson.

    And what would bring that lesson home more than a mirror that says sucker? I suppose, a mirror with a link to the free stuff [scambusters.org].

  • $99 for free info.. lame. Its like the pot calling the kettle black
  • Everyone's joking about how $99 to get access to a "museum" of web scams is a fraud. But nobody's posted on specifically what AdCops does -- while their home page is vague, their purpose is fairly specific. This older article in The Standard [thestandard.com] details specifically what they're doing. They're not a "museum," like in the front page posting.

    Specifically, AdCops started by targeting people from advertising-driven companies who are running scripts and bots to click-through ad banners millions of times to drive up their advertising revenues. Now, it appears that they're databasing people using credit card generators and other scams as well. It's not a museum, but a database for admins to correllate to try and get information on people scamming them out of money through those bogus click-throughs or generated cards.

    I dunno, but if I were paying to put up banners or accepting credit cards online, $99 for access to that kind of database would seem quite worthwhile...

    Eschatfische.

  • by Tackhead ( 54550 ) on Tuesday February 27, 2001 @10:47AM (#398257)
    > [Give me all your money and we'll give you more back]

    This is the "Nigerian 419 scam", or the "419 scam". Any keyword search will tell you what you need to know.

    The short version: Report it to the US Secret Service - it's their bailiwick under the auspices of the US Treasury. It's a popular scam among organized criminals - so popular that the Government of Nigeria periodically takes out full-page ads in financial dailies to warn people.

    419 scam victims have been killed on occasion. Not "lost their account", not "busted and wound up in a nice American jail". Just killed.

  • by Ace905 ( 163071 )
    This guy is a marketing genius, $99 and, "Besides, he adds: "This stuff is already floating around on the Internet anyway,"
  • >"Step right up! Step right up! See the latest in WEB SCAMS!"

    See the web scams for $99? Sheee-it, I get more scams than this in my incoming spamload every day!

  • I hope they can handle recursion of the site won't be complete.

    Kevin Fox
    --
  • by Shotgun ( 30919 ) on Tuesday February 27, 2001 @11:05AM (#398261)
    Let's hope it does.

    There's a common misconception about fraud victims: that they somewhow deserved what they got, because they were themselves greedy and bought an idea that was too good to be true. But that's just false. No victim is responsible for his own suffering. We all owe each other a duty to prevent victimhood whenever and wherever we find it.

    No I don't think that is a misconception. Most frauds use quick/easy money as bait, and they are generally quite obviously bullshit to anyone who will stop a minute to think. Two simple questions expose nearly any fraud:

    1) Where are they making their money?
    2) What makes me so special?

    People who refuse to slow down enough to ponder these questions before jumping for the vanishing money are below contempt in their greed.
    Fools and their money are soon parted. -Ben Franklin

    Fraud victims are usually poor and hopeless.

    I find the idea that anyone in the western world is hopeless to be ludicrous. Left with limited options? Yes. Hopeless? Bullshit! The two are not equivalent. If nothing else it is bonehead easy to get a factory job that will pay for schooling. I know. I was a 21yr old truck driver who lost his liscense with a new wife and a new baby. I worked bagging groceries as a second job until I got a job that would pay for schooling. Now I count myself amoung some of the highest paid professionals in the world. My former position is usually what is held up as 'hopeless'. Hell, the worst that I could have done was to hold my $10 hour factory job, ad infinitum.

    They're the same type who play state-sanctioned lotteries (why we tolerate those, I'll never understand) because they have no other source of hope. They're trying to scrape themselves a living, and along comes a wolf who fleeces them. That's a bad thing. That much is clear.

    And the wolf would be toothless if the fools would stop and think for a moment. But consider nature for a moment. The more predators there are, the more wary herbivores become. Evolution will even provide the hunted with additional defences to protect them from becoming prey.

    Now apply it to this situation. The more people get taken, the more wary they will become of being taken again. People will begin to read contracts and question the terms thereof. People will question what they are told by politicians. The online frauds are small potatoes compared to those proferred by the like of Republican Party, the Democrats, M$ and AOL, IMNSHO. People agree to abominable terms in contracts from large companies all the time because they feel comfortable that someone else is looking after them. People believe that their politicians don't lie to them because the other party is watching (except that the other party is also lying so they agree not to call each other on it). It's gotten to the point where large companies feel like they can have customers sign anything with imputence(sp?). Unfortunately, some of the companies are so large and control so much of so many markets that their terms must be accepted in order to operate effectively in society. A power they derive from the fact that so many do not question the contract terms.

    Down with the coddling. Let people be taken until they learn to be a little shrewd about thier business dealings. Fools don't deserve their money, and people will quickly learn to question what they are told and not to be foolish. It will make for a much better society all around once everyone looks out for themselves.

  • Yes, and I especially love the logic where the scammers (who have the opportunity to make WAAAAY more money than just $99, based on their list of top 3 offenders) wouldn't pay to get in. Um, yeah.
  • For example, you paid $99 to joing AdBusters.

    Careful. The organization is called Ad Cops. No need to smear Adbusters, which as far as I can see is completely unrelated.

  • Just click the url below...enjoy the benefits of membership for FREE.

    http://www.adcops.com/members/ [adcops.com]

    Any company that trusts their business to Adcops are fools and deserve everything or in this case nothing they will get other than incompetence. CNN covers crap like this...guess AOL really has taken the media to a whole new low.

    Anyways enjoy your free tour of the meseum!
  • "Its mission is to educate its members of the latest scams, but its $99 membership fee may make it an unpopular choice with so many similar services already available for free."

    Like which ones? This would be neat--but only if they have sarcastic comments like Consumer Reports does.


    Like the ones that cost $99 to join?
  • 99 bucks...I think I'd pay it...riiiight...just use a visa card then contest everything.
    -----
  • /. Error 406
    Unable to recurse.
  • The Top Ten Most Wanted List [adcops.com] is a hoot, filled with dire language describing people who "force clicks on banners" (i.e. click a banner to download a file) as having "Stole $2000". I'm picturing some guy pointing a gun at a user's head, screaming "CLICK IT!", then afterwards going to rob a convenience store.

    Some of the other comments are great also: "distributor of banner click software....heavy duty dude...beware!" Now I'm envisioning some cold-blooded ruffian fingering his glock as he puts the finishing touches on a Perl script.

    All your forced clicks [prmsystems.com] are belong to us.

  • $99 membership fee?

    Webpage, heal thyself. ;)
  • If the site is included in itself, would that make it honest, and therefore not includable?
  • Yeesh, look at the link to the credit card fraud [adcops.com] exhibit.

    According to the CNN article, that's one of the museum's "most eye-popping" entries.

    It's a text file from an old BBS. They didn't even bother to add HTML formatting. I mean, I could do better than that, and I'm an ignoramus!

  • anyone get paid recently? I didn't think so.

    SomethingAwful's Lowtax didn't get paid for months this past Fall. Unless you can afford the $1,000 doubleclick sign-up fee (another scam?) you're stuck with those who fly by night.

    Thank goodness we're all independently wealthy [ridiculopathy.com]

  • The Make Money Fast Hall of Humilation [ga.to] is still pretty good. It hasn't been updated in the past few years, though.
  • One of the best lists of email scams is 'HoaxBusters', "a public service of the CIAC Team and the U.S. Department of Energy."

    http://HoaxBusters.ciac.org/ [ciac.org]

  • Think about it, when the person subscribes to this "museum" they have to add their e-mail address. Could you imagine the worth of an e-mail list of people stupid enough to purchase something like this? If you'll fall for one, you'll fall for more.
  • Yeah... but how are you gonna wire transfer out 26 million dollars if you don't have the funds? You *can't*
  • If you put all the effective crime schemes in one central repository, won't that make it easier for small-time crooks to find them and start inflicting suffering on society's weak and feeble? Won't this also increase the number of copycat crimes?

    That's why they charge 99 bucks for it!!! That way YOU TOO can have the secret of making thousands, even millions of dollars on the internet!

    Don't you watch ANY late night (or Sunday afternoon) television?

    And I remember when late night and Sunday afternoon television used to be about black and white reruns and monster movies. I miss those days...

  • For a good list of scams try this [skepdic.com]
  • Anyone know of a site that just documents really horrible sites? By horrible I mean purely stupid or very poorly designed? The Olsen Twins site someone posted here amused me for about 30 minutes.

    If one doesn't exist a Slashdot-like site site of horrible web sites would be great.
  • anyone been jailed yet? fraudsters i mean not hackers

    Haven't you been to Adcops yet? Their Top Three [adcops.com] list reads like a Who's Who of computer fraudsters. Entirely coincidentally, the top two perpetrators both made off with exactly 37 million dollars each. The runner-up, a close third, made off with $5000.

    How the hell did these jokers get their press release picked up by CNN?

  • Yow! I didn't catch that when I previewed it (then again my coworkers were distracting me with their whining about wanting to go to lunch). I feel particularly bad as I love AdBusters Magazine and I recently finished the great book Culture Jam by Kalle Lasn (editor of AdBusters). I definitely didn't mean to smear AdBusters by accident!


    -------

  • it's unbelievable for how long this is going on and how many people sent them money: http://home.rica.net/alphae/419coal/index.htm
  • In an economy class, we have gone through one of this Nigerian scam affairs that made the first column in my country because the victim commited suicide.

    I will try to remember as much as I can.

    First the guys send you the mail or letter. Then they come to your house, well dressed and with some sort of official papers to sign or whatever.

    Then there are some "complications". The guys need some money to sort out "administrative fees".

    In the next step you get invited in the country to sign other papers at the bank. Usually at this point you get robbed/kidnapped/whatever and you need to empty you bank accounts to be free.

    Finally when you get back home, they will blackmail you or threaten to kill you for more money.

    That how it works as far as I remember.
  • "Ad Cops is a business-to-business membership consortium."
    Uh, since they're actually a business, not cops. Isn't it kind of misleading of them to call themselves cops and use that big star as a logo?

  • I got a snailmail version of this a while back. I turned it in to the Postal Inspection Service. I was tempted not to, though... it came in a nice handmade envelope made out of beautiful paper, hand-lettered with beautiful penmanship. It looked more like a wedding invitation from some extremely rich society dame than from some low-rent scammers in Africa...

  • Give me $99 and I'll show you all the ways that people can rip you off.

    That IS the general gist of all this, right?

    :)

    -Restil
  • I can see it now:

    pay the fee, log onto the site, and it says: "Scam #1 - fraud museum" and proceeds with a detailed description of their own site.
  • I give you $99, and you ensure that I don't get ripped off by $99... *hmmm*

    I bet that's one scam they don't warn you of!
  • But paranoia that the small company you're buying a computer from might disappear within a few months will lead to only trusting large companies. There *are* cases where it's important for fraud to be illegal.
  • Saying that if thieves must exist, then they should exist in large numbers and that they should all look alike is not the same as saying that their activities should be legal. The first situation allows the public to arm themselves and be wary of the fraudulent. The second gives the fraudulent free reign.

    Buying a computer should not be based on trust, and this is exactly one point covered in my previous post. Buying a computer should be based on a contract, whether explicitly signed or through common business laws. Fraud should always be illegal, and once the transaction is no longer based on trust, purchasing from the big or small would be less of an issue.

  • As this story [nytimes.com] will show, it appears that forwarding securities related spams to the SEC is very effective.

    As it says "The S.E.C., announcing its fifth nationwide Internet fraud sweep, said the people accused used so-called spam e-mail messages, electronic newsletters, Web sites, hyperlinks, message boards and other Internet media in cases involving both publicly traded securities and privately held companies."

    You use your methods and I'll sic the feds on them.

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