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Comment: Re:No worries mate (Score 4, Informative) 110

by cusco (#49777219) Attached to: Linux/Moose Worm Targets Routers, Modems, and Embedded Systems

The simple fact that you can leave the device with a default password encompasses several levels of stupidity. 1) Programmers who do not require password to be changed, 2) Manufacturers who will install that firmware, 3) Customers who leave it that way. Level 3 shouldn't even be possible except for stupidity and laziness in Level 1 and 2.

Comment: Re:It's not a networking issue. (Score 1) 384

by cusco (#49769419) Attached to: Ask Slashdot: Best Way To Solve a Unique Networking Issue?

I think you'll find that most embedded hardware has your "broken" IP implementation. Probably partly because it's more work to set it up correctly, but also because there are a lot of times where installers in the field or repair people in the shop have no way of knowing what the IP address of this stuff is supposed to be and need to be able to get at it. Devices that I have personally worked with would include a plethora of security cameras, Seimens I/O panels, Lantronix and Mercury TCP/IP to serial I/O converters, AMAG security hardware, two kinds of infant abduction systems, intercoms, and emergency alert systems. Some (most?) SCADA hardware is set up that way as well, I've been told. I suppose the reason why this isn't really considered a security issue is that you need physical access to the device to make it work.

Comment: Re: It's not a networking issue. (Score 1) 384

by cusco (#49761919) Attached to: Ask Slashdot: Best Way To Solve a Unique Networking Issue?

Because the device isn't identified by its IP address at the physical level, but by the MAC address. Your NIC will first do a MAC broadcast to see if the target is on the same network segment. If you use a hub it will be forwarded to all the other ports and the other NIC will answer, if you're on a switch it **should** forward the packet, but sometimes they'll be flaky and ignore a MAC broadcast.

Comment: Re:It's not a networking issue. (Score 1) 384

by cusco (#49746269) Attached to: Ask Slashdot: Best Way To Solve a Unique Networking Issue?

MAC addresses are assigned by NIC manufacturers, not the pump manufacturer (and I'll guarantee that a pump manufacturer has no clue how to build a NIC). Every NIC manufacturer has a set range of MAC addresses assigned to them, and each NIC gets its own unique MAC. I can look at a list of MAC addresses connected to a switch and tell you which devices are Lantronix boxes, which are Axis cameras, and which are Mercury access control panels just by looking at the MAC address ranges in use.

Comment: Re:How do you date when a tool was made? (Score 1) 103

by cusco (#49745991) Attached to: Oldest Stone Tools Predate Previous Record Holder By 700,000 Years

The number of people who have no clue how paleontologists and archeologists work but feel completely competent to criticize it never fails to amaze me. If it's this bad on Slashdot then I can only guess how ridiculous it must be on sites like CNN and Faux News.

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