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Comment: Re:Pioneers get arrows in back (Score 1) 101

Its a bad idea, full stop. Its a watch that requires a phone to be of any real value....at a time when most under 30 look upon a watch as a throwback to the days of disco.

Both of my boys are in their early 20s, neither have owned a watch...why? Because they have been surrounded by things with clocks built in since birth, that's why. I work less than a mile from the local college so I work around college kids all day...damned near zero watches, why? They already have a smartphone AND a tablet AND a laptop AND a clock in their cars....WTF they need a watch for? Hell I'm nearly 50 and haven't worn a watch in over a decade, the wife is 7 years older than me and doesn't even own one, that is what the phone in her pocket is for.

It just shows IMHO that Apple has run out of ideas as all the previous hits of the past decade plus, iPhone,iPad,iPod,etc were all things that people already used and had uses for that had bad UIs, the watch? The few people I know who refuse to let go of their watches are traditionalists that value things like Swiss movements and have NO desire to add high tech crap to their wrist, the rest? Well as one group of college kids in the shop said when the first talk of iWatches came up "If I have to have my phone...what do I need the watch for?". I couldn't think of an answer then other than "to give something for Apple to sell to hardcore fanboys" and I still can't come up with anything else, as for an ever growing segment of the population a watch belongs next to a rotary phone in the dustbin of history.

Comment: Re:Did they mention the yummy GMOs (Score 1) 185

by hairyfeet (#49499469) Attached to: Columbia University Doctors Ask For Dr. Mehmet Oz's Dismissal

Look at the circletimessquare account history....its a corp account designed to derail threads, the current clients appear to be Monsanto and any of the oil corps. It goes dead for months,then the "poster" cops a superior attitude and spams if any of the above are the headline (at last count "he" is up to nearly a dozen on this thread) while at almost the same instant a wall of ACs join in to heckle anybody that disagrees.

You might want to look up "how corporations control social media" and you'll see its following the plan to the letter, have 1 account to speak "from authority" on the subject while a wall of ACs parrot agreement while heckling those that disagree, thus causing the majority to go along for fear of being the minority. Its classic psychology 101 stuff.

Comment: can be under emergency authority, but politically (Score 1) 91

by raymorris (#49498809) Attached to: Incorrectly Built SLS Welding Machine To Be Rebuilt

That CAN be done under certain conditions, but unfortunately the political discourse of the time makes that politically expensive. For example, vice president Al Gore gave an award to one particular company and presented them as a case study of efficient and effective government contracting. He was right, they did a good job.

  A few years later, when the Bush administration needed to have infrastructure rebuilt in Iraq, they turned to the same company. Since they were known to be good and they were one of only two or three companies who could quickly accomplish projects of that type, they got an efficient deal - here's what needs to be done, and here's what we'll pay, now get started. (As opposed to 4 1/2 years for just the bid process). For the next ten years, those who voted for Gore vilified Bush for hiring the company Gore presented an example of excellence, Halliburton. It doesn't matter how good and how efficient they are, people will vilify you if you don't waste half the money on a thousands of pages of bid documents over several years, followed by tens of thousands of pages of oversight and compliance.

Comment: Re:Is banishment legal? (Score 1) 225

by hey! (#49498541) Attached to: Gyrocopter Pilot Appears In Court; Judge Bans Him From D.C.

Well, keeping you out of the public eye is an appropriate punishment when you're convicted of a political crime. But we shouldn't recognize political crimes.

If people want to pay attention to what this guy has to say because he gyrocoptered in restricted airspace, that's their business. Even though it's a pretty stupid reason, it shouldn't be a judge's role to sit in judgment of that.

THere's an important flip side to freedom of speech that is often overlooked: freedom of listening. As a citizen you should be able to hear what the government doesn't want you to hear, unless the government has a compelling reason, and even then the restrictions should be narrowly tailored. "That guy just pulled a stupid stunt," is not a compelling reason to intervene in what people choose to listen to.

Comment: Nah, McCarthy realized she was wrong and retracted (Score 2) 186

by raymorris (#49498399) Attached to: Columbia University Doctors Ask For Dr. Mehmet Oz's Dismissal

"in my opinion this guy is like Jenny McCarthy"

When Jenny McCarthy found out that what she was saying was wrong and harmful, she largely retracted her entire position. Oz knows what he's saying is wrong and harmful, but he keeps doing it, for the money.

Comment: have to rewrite muc federal law to not micromanage (Score 4, Informative) 91

by raymorris (#49498373) Attached to: Incorrectly Built SLS Welding Machine To Be Rebuilt

"and not micromanage it". That's the rub. The micromanaging, the reporting and compliance costs, can be over 50% of the cost for some federal contracts, but most of the time that's required by thousands upon thousands of pages of federal law. When you have a comoany that knows how to do a certain thing , aka one of those evil corporations, getting hired by the federal government, some people want to do a lot of paperwork and stuff to keep track of what's going on, and other people go crazy with it. The organization I work for used to do a lot of federal contracts. We quit and now just do state contracts for states that are reasonable.

    Still other people added a bunch of requirements for federal contracting that aren't really relevant to the project. For example, how many black women work for each of your major suppliers? How much do your interns make? Are all of the web pages and documentation you've ever made fully accessible to people who are both blind and deaf?

We quit dealing with the feds and certain states because it's just not worth it. It would cost SPACEX five times as much to build a federally-contracted rocket than it costs to build their own.

Comment: The important question... (Score 3, Interesting) 91

by fuzzyfuzzyfungus (#49498339) Attached to: Incorrectly Built SLS Welding Machine To Be Rebuilt
The article does not mention where the cost of this error is going to fall. This seems like an important detail. On a sufficently complex project, one of the bevy of subcontractors fucking something up isn't a huge surprise; but I would be very, very, disappointed if NASA wasn't able to contract sufficiently vigorously to make the vendor eat the cost of delivering the goods as specified, rather than paying them for their effort no matter how well or badly they do.

Comment: There is the small issue of academic freedom. (Score 1) 186

by hey! (#49498337) Attached to: Columbia University Doctors Ask For Dr. Mehmet Oz's Dismissal

You can't fire a faculty member because outside the scope of his duties he expresses an opinion you don't like -- even if it's a clearly crackpot opinion. If you could, Stanford would have kicked Linus Pauling out when he became a Vitamin C crackpot.

The difference, though, is that Pauling was a sincere crackpot -- brilliant people are often susceptible to crackpottery because they're so used to being more right than their neighbors. Dr. Oz is a snake-oil salesman; when he's faced with people who are educated -- not necessarily scientists but critical thinkers -- in a forum he doesn't control, he speaks in a much more equivocal fashion. That shows he knows the language he uses on his show and in his magazine is irresponsible.

So selling snake-oil isn't crackpottery, it's misconduct. But somebody's got to find, chapter and verse, the specific institutional rules of conduct Dr. Oz's misconduct violates. There will have to be due process, particularly if he's a tenured professor, which will probably require lesser disciplinary measures than dismissal be tried first.

+ - Is This Justice? EFF pushes Pasco County to be sensible with 8th Grade "Hacker"-> 1

Submitted by Anonymous Coward
An anonymous reader writes "A 14-year-old eighth grader in Florida, Domanik Green, has been charged with a felony for “hacking” his teacher’s computer. The “hacking” in this instance was using a widely known password to change the desktop background of his teacher’s computer with an image of two men kissing. The outrage of being charged with a felony for what essentially amounts to a misguided prank should be familiar to those who follow how computer crimes are handled by our justice system.

Charging decisions and punishment should be proportional to the harm a person causes. The only thing that “making an example” out of Domanik Green accomplishes is to make an example of how out of whack our computer crime laws—and the prosecutorial discretion that accompanies it—are. We call on Pasco County to do the sensible thing and not ruin Domanik Green’s life. This is not justice.

Now what do you think?"

Link to Original Source

+ - Twitter moves non-US accounts to Ireland away from the NSA-> 1

Submitted by Mark Wilson
Mark Wilson (3799011) writes "Twitter has updated its privacy policy, creating a two-lane service that treats US and non-US users differently. If you live in the US, your account is controlled by San Francisco-based Twitter Inc, but if you're elsewhere in the world (anywhere else) it's handled by Twitter International Company in Dublin, Ireland. The changes also affect Periscope.

What's the significance of this? Twitter Inc is governed by US law, it is obliged to comply with NSA-driven court requests for data. Data stored in Ireland is not subject to the same obligation. Twitter is not alone in using Dublin as a base for non-US operations; Facebook is another company that has adopted the same tactic. The move could also have implications for how advertising is handled in the future."

Link to Original Source

APL is a write-only language. I can write programs in APL, but I can't read any of them. -- Roy Keir

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