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Comment Re:This is NOT a matter of trademark violation (Score 2) 204

Not necessarily. Take a look at the relevant portion of the Lantham Act. It would have to fit one of the provisions therein. It might make a false suggestion of affiliation, but it's arguable.

15 U.S.C. 1125 - False designations of origin, false descriptions, and dilution forbidden

(a) Civil action

(1) Any person who, on or in connection with any goods or services, or any container for goods, uses in commerce any word, term, name, symbol, or device, or any combination thereof, or any false designation of origin, false or misleading description of fact, or false or misleading representation of fact, which

(A) is likely to cause confusion, or to cause mistake, or to deceive as to the affiliation, connection, or association of such person with another person, or as to the origin, sponsorship, or approval of his or her goods, services, or commercial activities by another person, or

(B) in commercial advertising or promotion, misrepresents the nature, characteristics, qualities, or geographic origin of his or her or another person's goods, services, or commercial activities,

shall be liable in a civil action by any person who believes that he or she is or is likely to be damaged by such act.

Comment Re:As a UNIX head and former MS-hater . . . (Score 1) 242

Y'know, Microsoft has never made any bones about their OS being a proprietary system.

Windows made money selling copies. Apple makes money taking a cut of every sale in their walled garden. Google makes money data mining the shit out of everything. The new Microsoft seems to want to be the old Microsoft + Apple + Google. It used to be pick your poison, now it's all of the above. I hope they choke on it.

Piracy

James Cameron: Theater Experience Key To Containing Piracy (torrentfreak.com) 256

Director James Cameron says that the key to containing movie piracy is preserving the theater experience as something special. He made the remarks when reporters asked him about his views on Sean Parker's upcoming streaming service Screening Room which will reportedly allow users to watch a new movie on the same day as its theatre release. From a TorrentFreak article: Cameron believes that having first-run movies in the home will stop people heading off to the cinema, the place where filmmakers can really showcase their art and take the fight to piracy. "The biggest hedge against piracy is still the sanctity of the viewing experience in a movie theater -- when it comes to movies," he says. "With The Walking Dead or something like that, that's not what you're selling, but if we're talking about movies and theatrical exhibition, keeping it great, making it a special experience, is still the biggest hedge against [piracy]." Interestingly, Cameron also says that even if piracy somehow became legal and download speeds were drastically improved, viewing content outside the theatrical setting would still come up short. "You're still watching [movies] on a small platform, and it's not that social experience," he explains.

Comment This is NOT a matter of trademark violation (Score 1) 204

You violate a trademark if you mis-represent a good or service as that of the trademark holder. And it has to be in the same trademark category that they registered. Having a trademark does not grant ownership of a word, and does not prevent anyone else from using that word. Use of a trademark in reporting and normal discussion is not a violation.

Submission + - How transparent should companies be when operational technology failures happen? 1

supernova87a writes: Last week, Southwest Airlines had an epic crash of IT systems across their entire business, when "a router failure caused the airlines' systems to crash... and all backups failed, causing flight delays and cancellations nationwide and costing the company probably $10 million in lost bookings alone." Huge numbers of passengers, crew, airplanes were stranded as not only reservations systems, but scheduling, dispatch, and other critical operational systems had to be rebooted over 12 hours. Passenger delays directly attributable to this incident continued to trickle down all the way from Wednesday to Sunday as the airline recovered.

Aside from the technical issues of what happened, what should a public facing company's obligation be to discuss what happened in full detail? Would publicly talking about the sequence of events before and after failure help restore faith in their operations? Perhaps not aiming for Google-levels of admirable disclosure (as in this 18-minute cloud computing outage where a full post-mortem was given) — but should companies aim to discuss more openly what happened? And how they recover from systems failures?

Comment Re:5.38 hours per day (Score 1) 172

And from what I've seen of college kids now, while they're not watching television per se - they do seem to spend an inordinate amount of time watching stuff like YouTube and swapping SnapChat videos (they don't seem to actually chat much on SnapChat, which seems weird but them I'm old). It wouldn't surprise me if the total amount of time they spend on new media rivals what their parents and grandparents spend in front of the boob tube.

Meet the new boob tube, same as the old boob tube. Except more boobs.

Comment Re: Er (Score 4, Insightful) 562

No. We honestly need to expect a certain level of competency from ENGINEERS. People are allowed to be stupid.

People can be as stupid or drunk or tired or half-blind as they like, LICENSED DRIVERS who operate two tons of metal travelling at 70+ mph need to take some damn responsibility for that. Thankfully he only won a Darwin award but if he'd killed somebody I'd call that a clear case of vehicular manslaughter which can land you in prison for a very long time. Drivers that can't do their part should hand in their license and wait for the real self-driving cars.

Comment Re: drone ship landings require a lot less fuel? (Score 1) 103

I have the front panel of the VAX 11/780 used to render that scene hanging on my wall, but I got to Pixar after that project. This year and last I've contributed some designs that will fly on a FEMA satellite, and a long time ago did a little work to support the Biosciences mission on the shuttle.

Comment Re:You made the bed. Now sleep in it. (Score 2) 346

I don't wonder. I see it as one of the human brain's greatest weaknesses. More and more research shows that once people pick a side, they are highly likely to dig in and contrary evidence actually reinforces their incorrect position. Perhaps this served some evolutionary purpose (you only need to learn fire is hot once)

Probably more local diversity so we don't get wiped out by spurious reasoning, mono-culture or get stuck on some local maximum. Instead of risking the whole tribe jumping on what they think is a good thing we'll divide into camps with the old ways and the new ways like a primitive scientific experiment. Today we don't have that strong evolutionary pressure but back when people would starve and freeze and die from all sorts of injuries and diseases I imagine this could be rather important in a shifting environment with droughts and floods and heat waves and cold waves and packs of animals coming and going could change the optimal choice quite often. Perhaps we had an evolutionary need to have people stick with what's worked in the past even if it doesn't seem to be working right now.

The other part might be that we're used to people having an agenda. The more persistent people are to convince you something is true, the more skeptical we get. There might be a value to having made up your own opinion rather than to take someone else's, even if it's wrong. That one seems even more relevant today, since more and more of what we do is make ourselves familiar with second hand knowledge, things others have found out and put to paper. There's so many tons of it you just have to accept you barely have time to get a tiny glimpse of our collective knowledge. And let's face it, a lot of that has been fantasy and fiction. You can't see AGW, but people say it exists like they used to say dragons exist. It's hard to know what is actually facts.

Comment Re:My Fingers Have An Alternative... (Score 0) 396

Reality check, all non-Windows platforms combined have <5% market share on Steam and falling. Most users couldn't install a new OS if they wanted to and even if they did they'd miss all their other Windows applications. And even assuming they did they'd lose a ton of Windows exclusive games that wouldn't run despite Steam being on Linux and suffer performance/driver issues in many others. Valve would have to do much more to make AAA games support Vulkan well if they want people to even consider a Steam Machine.

Comment Re:Provide your phone number for extra security? (Score 2) 147

This adds no additional security to a system secured with a password

Sure it does - It means you have two passwords, rather than a password and a piece of publicly-available information... Though the GP already gets that, I basically just rephrased his "type garbage, and save a copy" as something a bit more user-friendly. :)

That said, I otherwise agree with you completely - Though, I also don't really see the problem here. Biometrics would solve some of the usability issues with passwords, but at the cost of introducing entirely new ones.

Really, I think a lot of this comes down to "how much security is enough"? Sending an SMS for two-factor counts as far, far more than adequate 99% of the time; and that even counts as massive overkill 99% of the time. For virtually all uses, just using something like your favorite porn star's name is good enough.

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