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Comment Re:Interesting how few controls there are (Score 2) 49

I've worked for big companies most of my career, and regular employees making purchases, signing contracts, etc. takes an act of God. I can't spend $100 on supplies without getting competitive bids.

See, that's where you're going wrong. I've actually had clients tell me that a proposal has to be _over_ a certain dollar amount - if it's less than (for example) $50k, it's subject to a lot more oversight than, say, $1M. Small, petty cash type purchases are even more difficult, relatively speaking. Good luck trying to get approval for a new mouse for your workstation!

Comment Not quite. She had $123 million when they met (Score 1) 49

His wife was an heir, along with her sister, to a hotel company which owned a chain and non-chain properties including the Beverly Hills Hotel. She got $123 million from that. When they divorced, she gave him $23 million. So there wasn't anything him giving her hundreds of millions and her giving it back.

He did pay hundreds of millions in fines and restitution. He may have managed to keep a few million in ill-gotten gains.

Comment Re:Sunk cost fallacy (Score 1) 197

I'm not even going down that old rabbit hole. Yes, it's their legal right. Nobody cares. But this is the part that gets me:

>> Twitter is not the only means of communication.
> That's... kind of entirely my point.

How does forcing them to use a different communication medium stop them from spreading ideas you disagree with? It seems to me that giving them the allure of being the 'stuff THEY don't want you to see' only helps promote it, instead.

Comment Probabilities (Score 1) 371

TFA: [A simulation] would require everything in the universe, at its smallest scale, has some definite property, some obvious state of yes or no. We already know that isn't true, explained Hossenfelder. There are few definite things in quantum mechanics, only probabilities. Elementary particles like electrons have a property called spin, for example. Quantum mechanics says that if we're not looking at the particles, we can't say what their spin value is, we can only model the probability of each spin value. That's what Schrodinger's cat is all about...

I don't see how that rules out simulation. Just because we "mortals" cannot see the probability computations doesn't mean they are not part of the simulation.

Further, some argue quantum physics supports the idea of simulation because it allows the details to remain fuzzy until somebody actually observes it. This is a common game strategy to avoid pre-building the details of an entire world: only fill in the details when the players get close to or enter something.

Comment 3 articles referencing the same statement, misunde (Score 4, Insightful) 71

The three articles you posted were all about what Lorrie Cranor said, but you seem to misunderstand what she said. Cranor did NOT say that it's a bad idea to change YOUR password.

What Cranor said is that there are downsides to forcing everyone to change their password every month or so.

People will not remember a new password every month, so if forced to "change" it monthly they'll either write it on a Post-It note or just use [password]1, [password]2, [password]3, etc, not really changing the password, Cranor said. She's not wrong - there absolutely is a limit to how *often* you should *force* people to change their password.

Also, leaks happen, leaks with millions of accounts, so you will be safer if you change your password *ocassionally*. I use a system in which I can change my password 6-12 months, without having to remember a new password. Another fact about passwords is that the safe length for a password keeps getting longer - I now normally call it a "pass phrase". When I started in security, an eight-character password was considered secure. So what I do is every so often I add a couple characters to my base password.

Imagine in 1998 maybe I could have used "pallFurt" as my base password. In 2000 I'd start using "pallFurt!?". In 2002, "4pallFurt!?". In 2004, "4pallFurt!?Dh". So I don't have to remember something completely different each time, but password changes, meaning dumps from old sites don't have my current password (besides it's slightly different for each site).

Submission + - Quicken Bill Pay is No Longer Safe to Use (perens.com) 1

Bruce Perens writes: I don't usually make security calls, but when a company makes egregious and really clueless security mistakes, it's often the case that the only way to attract their attention and get the issue fixed is to publicize it. This one is with Quicken Bill Pay, a product of Metavante (not Intuit). It's from personal observation rather than an expert witness case, and the company has been unresponsive through their customer support channel.

Comment Re:Conversely... (Score 1) 224

Thank you for affirming as much of my argument as you did and, also, for the corrections in the second half of that post. That's some good information, of which I was not aware. Out of curiosity, what are your thoughts on shortening the term (of both, but primarily patents, as that's your focus)?

I think patents are probably about right as is. As you note, some industries develop faster than others... but if you start basing patent term off that, then do you create different term lengths for every industry? Like pharmaceuticals get 20 years, but software gets 3? Airplanes are 15, but cars are 5? Given the number of industries and the fine delineations we could make, you'd end up with more law than the tax code... 8-bit retro indie video games get 7 months; but 8-bit retro AAA video games get 9 months... two legged walking robots get 4 years and eight months, three legged wheeled robots get 3 years and 11 months, etc. Congress would spend all of its time passing new patent term laws. And what about the cross-over technologies? Software for developing pharmaceuticals? Biological computers? Simulated cars for video games?! And what about a revolutionary new technology, where the patent is the first in a whole new industry? Hundreds of years? Or none?
20 years seems like a pretty decent compromise, particularly with the maintenance fees. One thing that could help is additional maintenance windows... Right now, you pay your fees at 3.5 years from issue, 7.5 years, and 11.5 years (with the costs increasing each time). Many software patents are abandoned before hitting that 11.5 window. But what about 5.5, or 9.5? Or even annual fees, steadily increasing? That would help encourage shorter terms for patents that are obsoleted early.

As for copyright, there are multiple parts there (copyright is often compared to a bundle of rights, with exclusive rights to make copies, distribute works, perform the work publicly, make derivative works, etc.). I think piracy - direct copies, identical to the original - is less morally defensible than, say, sampling, which falls under the derivative work umbrella. Like, if you make and distribute a copy of someone's album because you're too cheap to pay or whatnot, that's just wrong. Heck, at best, it's plagiarism. But if you sample their bass line and make a new song over it, you've created something new, and the world of art is enriched due to your joint contribution.
With that in mind, I think that the term for a derivative work should be short - like 5 years. The original artist gets to do remixes, screenplays, etc. for that period, but if they don't, then it should be up for grabs - as source for further creative works. But pure copying? That term could stay as long as it is, frankly. Let the authors exploit their original work, but let others also improve upon it.

Comment Re:Digital Rights? (Score 1) 101

I can't recall the last time I looked for media that wasn't available in an unencrypted stream within hours of being released in digital format, whatever the DRM.

Well, just checked Amazon now and there's 366 4K BluRays out, as far as I know there's no decrypting those yet. Not that I'm sure how you'd play an UHD HEVC HDR 10 bit Rec. 2020 stream properly anyway. BluRays look pretty good though...

Comment Totally not gloating (Score 3) 103

Norway
Mean: 47 Mbit
Median: 27.7 Mbit
People <4 Mbit: 3.9%
People <1 Mbit: 0.5%
People who can't get fiber: 54%
People who can't get 100/10 Mbit: 22%
People who can't get 4 Mbit on a fixed connection: 5%
People who can't get 10 Mbit LTE outdoor w/antenna: 0.06%

I thought maybe the fiber rollout would slow down, but the last stats indicate a speed up going from 41% to 46% in last year. Next year it seems likely a majority of the population can get fiber.

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