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Submission + - mechanics of the rejection of science (theguardian.com) 1

Layzej writes: Science strives for coherence. For example, the findings from climate science form a highly coherent body of knowledge that is supported by many independent lines of evidence. Those who reject climate science often rely on several mutually contradictory ideas. Hence, claims that the globe “is cooling” can coexist with claims that the “observed warming is natural” and that “the human influence does not matter because warming is good for us.” A recent study examines this behavior at the aggregate level, but gives many examples where contradictory ideas are held by the same individual, and sometimes are presented within a single publication.

The common denominator among contrarian positions is the conviction that climate change either does not exist or is not human caused, and that either way it does not present a risk (or if it does, then adaptation will deal with the problem). In a nutshell, the opposition to GHG emission cuts is the unifying and coherent position underlying all manifestations of climate science denial. Climate science denial is therefore perhaps best understood as a rational activity that replaces a coherent body of science with an incoherent and conspiracist body of pseudo-science for political reasons and with considerable political coherence and effectiveness.

Submission + - Moving Beyond Flash: The Yahoo HTML5 Video Player (streamingmedia.com)

theweatherelectric writes: Over on Streaming Media, Amit Jain from Yahoo has written a behind-the-scenes look at the development of Yahoo's HTML5 video player. He writes, "Adobe Flash, once the de-facto standard for media playback on the web, has lost favor in the industry due to increasing concerns over security and performance. At the same time, requiring a plugin for video playback in browsers is losing favor among users as well. As a result, the industry is moving toward HTML5 for video playback. [...] At Yahoo, our video player uses HTML5 across all modern browsers for video playback. In this post we will describe our journey to providing an industry-leading playback experience using HTML5, lay out some of the challenges we faced, and discuss opportunities we see going forward."

Submission + - Bill Gates: Voter Opposition to Globalization is 'A Huge Concern' 1

theodp writes: GeekWire reports that the groundswell of populist opposition to open markets and collaboration among countries is "a huge concern" to Bill Gates. "Globalization has had these huge benefits of speeding up innovation and causing product prices to be far lower than they would be otherwise," argued Gates. "But the fact that people, net, see it as a bad thing — and that a vote like the Brexit vote or some other votes are a move to 'Hey, we don’t like change, we want to set back the clock, we want to be more local in our thinking' — that’s a huge concern." Commenters didn't exactly see eye-to-eye with the world's richest man.

Submission + - UPS is Testing Emergency Deliveries via Drone (techcrunch.com)

sbhagwandin writes: UPS is working with aerospace company CyPhy to test deliveries for urgent packages. The test scenario required the drone to deliver a mock asthma inhaler to a patient on an island, which would have required a longer trip by car or boat. The drone completed the 3-mile journey across open water in about 8 minutes.

Submission + - Sad reality: It's cheaper to get hacked than build strong IT defenses (theregister.co.uk)

schwit1 writes: A study by the RAND Corporation, published in the Journal of Cybersecurity, looked at the frequency and cost of IT security failures in US businesses and found that the cost of a break-in is much lower than thought – typically around $200,000 per case. With top-shelf security systems costing a lot more than that, not beefing up security looks in some ways like a smart business decision.

"I've spent my life in security and everyone expects firms to invest more and more," the report's author Sasha Romanosky told The Reg. "But maybe firms are making rational investments and we shouldn't begrudge firms for taking these actions. We all do the same thing, we minimize our costs."

Submission + - The 2016 Ig Nobel prizes are here. VW wins the prize for chemistry! (improbable.com)

whoever57 writes: The 2016 Ig Nobel prizes were awarded yesterday, Thursday, September 22. Notable amongst the winners was VolksWagen, who won the Chemistry prize for "solving the problem of excessive automobile pollution emissions by automatically, electromechanically producing fewer emissions whenever the cars are being tested." No one from VW attended the ceremony to collect the prize. Other notable winners included a team who won the Peace Prize for their groundbreaking work analyzing the detection of "Pseudo-Profound Bullshit."

Submission + - How ITT Tech Screwed Students and Made Millions (gizmodo.com)

An anonymous reader writes: This is a grim story about a company that screwed poor people, military veterans, and taxpayers to turn a profit. It includes shocking details about the inner-working of the for-profit college including stuff like this:

"ITT recruiters even manipulated prospective students using pain-based sales techniques. Recruiters used a sales strategy called the “Pain Funnel” that encouraged them to ask progressively more hurtful questions to get prospective students to enroll in the school."

Submission + - Google Fiber wins critical Nashville Metro Council Vote (arstechnica.com)

bundis writes: Nashville's Metro Council passed the "One Touch Make Ready" proposal that would allow Google Fiber techs to move AT&T and Comcast lines and equipment. The critical third vote by the Metro Council took place on Wednesday night. Of course, AT&T and Comcast have voiced their displeasure. Lawsuits are inevitable so this story is far from over.

Submission + - Would you live in a wooden skyscraper? (sciencemag.org)

sciencehabit writes: Scientists and architects across the globe are trying to adapt wood, one of the oldest building materials, for the demands of the modern city. Spurred by new ways to work with wood and concerns about the environmental toll of urban construction, they are trying to push the limits of height for wood construction and win wider acceptance for its use. Engineers have conceived designs for soaring wooden skyscrapers that, at up to 80 stories, would rival their steel-framed cousins. But wood’s true potential for 21st century cities is likely to emerge in the lab, where scientists are conducting myriad torture tests on new designs for wooden walls, beams, ceilings, and floors. Their goal: to see whether wood can overcome concerns about fire safety and strength that, in the past, have consigned wood to low-rises and single family houses.

Submission + - Network-On-Chip (netspeedsystems.com)

Radha Shelke writes: NetSpeed Systems has developed a network on chip (NoC) architecture a set of tools designed to synthesise the best type of network for a given SoC, for better performance.

Submission + - Nearly All of the Top 1,000 Companies Have Leaked Credentials Online

Trailrunner7 writes: Many CSOs live in fear of waking up to an email reporting a data breach at their company, but the threat to an enterprise isn’t limited to a compromise of that specific organization. A new report shows that there are leaked employee credentials online for 97 percent of the top 1,000 global companies, many of which came from third-party breaches.

The last few years have seen a number of large-scale breaches at popular sites and companies, including LinkedIn, Adobe, MySpace, and Ashley Madison, and many of the credentials stolen during those incidents have ended up online in various places. Corporate employees, like most other users, often reuse their credentials in several places. But the worrisome thing is that many of them are using their work email addresses and passwords as credentials on third-party sites.

The research from Digital Shadows found that the most significant breach for the global 1,000 companies it looked at was the LinkedIn incident. The breach occurred in 2012, but a large set of users’ credentials was dumped online earlier this year, extending the ripple effect from the compromise. Digital Shadows found more than 1.6 million credentials online for the 1,000 companies it studied. Adobe’s breach was next on the list, with more than 1.3 million credentials.

Submission + - Finland and IBM partner to develop personalized healthcare with AI

Kiuas writes: "Tekes – the Finnish Funding Agency for Innovation and IBM today announced a partnership that will enable Finland to utilize Watson cognitive computing to help doctors improve the health of its citizens, and strengthen and develop the Finnish innovation and business ecosystem in the fields of health and well-being. To facilitate the collaboration, IBM intends to establish a Watson Health Center of Excellence in Finland, the first Nordic Healthcare Competence Center, and the first National Imaging Center of Excellence outside the United States in Finland.

Finland has a unique health ecosystem characterized by full electronic health records and nation-wide access to healthcare, in addition to the close co-operation among public and private sector entities working in health and wellness. Finland is also a European forerunner in designing new legislation for secondary and secure use of data on well-being and health. Enabling regulation is believed to open new opportunities for research, development and innovations.

"Tekes estimates that investments by Finnish companies and Tekes to artificial intelligence in well-being and healthcare will reach hundreds of millions euros over the next five years," said Director Anssi Pulkkinen, strategic head of well-being and health at Tekes. "Cognitive technologies, like IBMs Watson, will enable a new management design and systemic control of healthcare. Tekes' vision is an open healthcare ecosystem based on compliant and efficient utilization of healthcare data, making our hospitals the world's most advanced data-led IoT hospitals."

The Hospital District of Helsinki and Uusimaa (HUS) is planning to work with Watson Health and employ cognitive computing to aid in the early identification of serious bacterial infections in prematurely born babies and to bolster imaging of cerebral hemorrhage patients. HUS is also evaluating Watson Health and employing cognitive computing to aid physicians in providing patients with personalized cancer care. "IBMs approach to AI, with its focus on augmenting human intelligence, may open up entirely new avenues for us to develop treatments. There is potentially globally groundbreaking research in these areas of application with Watson cognitive computing," said Chief Medical Officer of HUS Markku Mäkijärvi."

Submission + - Vandenberg Fire Threatens ULA, SpaceX Launches (latimes.com)

Bruce Perens writes: A fire at Vandenberg Air Force Base on the California coast, currently over 10,000 acres in size, has approached the pads used by SpaceX and United Launch Alliance. No structures have been damaged, but power lines have been destroyed. There is about 1000 feet of firebreak around each pad, but the presence of smoke and the absence of electrical power is potentially a problem for rockets, payloads, and ground-support equipment. The WorldView 4 satellite and a Delta 4, and a SpaceX Falcon 9 with at least 7 and potentially 11 Iridium satellites are known to be on site. Ground support equipment at the base constitutes the United States only access to polar orbit for large rockets without overflying populated areas. Liquid oxygen stored on the site may already have been released as a precaution or boiled off, and there are large supplies of rocket fuel, but these have so far not been at hazard.

The Soberanes fire near Big Sur, 180 miles farther South on the California coast, has gone on for two months, burning 185 square miles and costing over 200 Million dollars to fight with no end in sight. Obviously, it's dry out there.

Submission + - Apple patents bold new innovation – a paper bag (theguardian.com)

mspohr writes: Continuing its leadership in innovation, Apple has patented a paper bag. We all remember the groundbreaking "rounded corners" innovation Now we have a paper bag!!! Just try to make your own paper bag and you'll be speaking with Apple lawyers,
(Note: In fairness to Apple, this is a "special" paper bag which is stronger due to numerous improvements on your ordinary bag... just don't try to copy it.)

Submission + - Homeland Security Preparing Guide for Securing Connected Things (securityledger.com)

chicksdaddy writes: The Department of Homeland Security is readying a set of security guidelines for Internet of Things device makers and for consumers that it will soon release, The Security Ledger is reporting (https://securityledger.com/2016/09/exclusive-dhs-readies-guidance-for-securing-internet-of-things/).

DHS, which houses the U.S. Computer Emergency Readiness Team (CERT), as well as the U.S. Secret Service, is assembling a set of strategic principles that it says will help safeguard and secure the Internet of Things by providing high level guidance to industry about how to design and manufacture secure connected devices. For consumers, DHS will lay out guidelines about how to manage the risks posed by Internet connected devices in their homes, cars and businesses.

Robert Silvers, the DHS Assistant Secretary for Cyber Policy, told Security Ledger that the agency thinks it can play a key role in setting cross industry standards for the Internet of Things.

“What we’ve come to recognize is that the Internet of Things is a full-blown phenomenon,” said Rob Silvers, the DHS Assistant Secretary for Cyber Policy. “We think everyone. Govt. industries, consumers need to get serious about reasonable security being built into IoT devices. And we need to do it now before we’ve deployed an entire ecosystems,” he said.

Silvers will outline the agency's forthcoming guidance in a speech at The Security of Things Forum (https://www.securityofthings.com) in Cambridge, Mass on Thursday.

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