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Comment Re:You were hired to work for THEM (Score 1) 379

It's not just free overtime.

That is often very much what being on a salary means in practice: you get X money per day/month/whatever, and X doesn't increase if you work more than your normal hours. However, it's also not unusual for salaried employees to have those normal working hours specified in their employment contracts, effectively putting a lower bound on the amount of working time expected in exchange for the salary.

Again, though, this all depends very much on where you are and how your local labour laws work. For example, the US system of at-will employment is actually closer to what most of the world would consider contract or freelance work than employment, typically involving very little commitment to continuing the relationship by either side and relatively low benefits for employees beyond their pay cheque. What is particularly unusual in that case is that in much of the US such an arrangement seems to be the norm even for entry-level and low-paid work. Elsewhere, employment tends to involve much more of a commitment from both sides for those kinds of jobs, while the lighter touch arrangements tend to be used more for skilled professional work. In that context, abusive hiring and firing is usually less of a problem, and all parties may benefit from the greater flexibility, including flexibility about compensation arrangements.

Comment Re:AKA "snowflake syndrome" (Score 1) 279

Let me guess, they were expected to be productive members of the team and not just the token minority, and that got to be too much for them, so they quit rather than be fired for incompetence.

Quoted for visiblity - thats not mere flamebait.

However, I wonder if the truth lies elsewhere: some people are smart enough to realize how badly the industry in general treats developers, and just pick a better line of work.

Comment Re:EE Degree (Score 1) 198

Yes, immutable objects are over-emphasized right now as the essence of good programming, from what I've seen. Still, it's nice to see recognition of the value of that style outside of functional programming. It's a shame none of the current mainstream languages have "const and not null" as the default for all declarations - I think the programming world with be a better place if you had to explicitly declare something either mutable or nullable.

Comment Re:Wait, let me get this straight... (Score 1) 101

Most American banks aren't building those kinds of buildings *now*. I think they stopped doing that in the 50s. Seeing that kind of building implies they've been around a long time. I don't know if it was considered over-spending when it was done. It was a more common thing to do in the early 20th century. It may have been a kind of reassuring message to people who grew up in the Depression. A "we're here to stay" expressed in architecture. Banks also may have been in competition at that time to pull in well-heeled customers who didn't want to be seen going into a shabby building. People cared about stuff like that back then--guys wore suits all the time, and Fedoras with the suit as they were meant to be worn, with no hint of irony.

Comment Re:You were hired to work for THEM (Score 1) 379

Exactly.

Obviously if it's authorised 20% time or something then it's fine (but watch the IP agreements, because anything you create on that basis might well belong to your employer legally).

Otherwise, if you want to be paid for your results and not your time, become a freelancer or start your own company and work business-to-business, and have appropriate clauses in your contract about the basis of payment and what is included and not included. Don't be an employee and then try to not be an employee.

Some of the rationalisations of this that you can see on the original Quora discussion and the related discussions today on sites like Reddit are just bizarre, and there seem to be a disturbing number of people who are mighty confident about their legal position but who probably ought to have checked with a lawyer themselves before getting into this.

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