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Comment Re:Wow. (Score 1) 84

SSBNs stay submerged for 6 months at a time. I don't think the difference between 6 and 8 is enough to matter.

Umm, no. I served on USS Kamehameha. SSBN 642. Two months and change out, switch crews, repeat forever.

Many subs have had smaller crews, and nearly all of your interactions are with a few people at your work station.

While virtually all subs had smaller crews than modern SSBN's, they seldom had crews fewer than 30 or so. Notable exceptions being an assortment of "minisubs" used at various points in WW2, all of which spent a couple days underway at a time.

And it might surprise you to know that you seldom socialize all that much with they guys at your workstation. When you're working, you're too busy for much in the way of social interactions. You interact socially with the guys on the messdeck during meals and movies (when you can stay awake to watch a movie).

Note that one of the biggest problems with a trip to Mars is likely to be boredom. Six of you in a freefall can. No course changes, no repairs, not much in the way of science to do till arrival.

Mind you, a lot of that can be fixed by sending a bigger expedition - 60 guys plus instrumentation and such for doing some decent science while underway, that sort of thing....

But there is another huge psychological consideration that makes a sub much more like a space flight: You can't quit.

Now this I can't argue with. A good point. Note that this makes the test even more (potentially) useful. If the guys in the dome can't handle it in Easy Mode, sure as shooting it won't work for a Real Mars mission....

Comment Re:Broken Copyright (Score 1) 131

This is the system that Barak Hussain Obama defended and did not fix for the last 8 years. We will have to see what the next administration brings.

Likewise President Bush for eight years. Neither of them did anything about it because neither of them could. U.S. copyright policy is in the hands of the legislative branch. The US Patent and Trademark Office is part of the Department of Commerce, but the Copyright Office is part of the Library of Congress. Blame the Republican senators and the Democratic senators. Better yet, blame the incumbent publishers that provide campaign contributions, super PAC contributions, and in-kind donations of coverage on their affiliated TV news outlets.

Comment Re:Seriously wtf (Score 1) 131

Link's not an elf; he's a Hylian. The Zelda universe has its own counterpart to wood elves, called Kokiri. Link in Ocarina of Time was raised by Kokiri.

But at least CBS and Paramount have decided to embrace fan creativity by publishing guidelines for what constitutes an acceptable fan work. Nintendo doesn't at all.

Submission + - Humans, not climate change, wiped out Australian megafauna (phys.org)

schwit1 writes: New evidence involving the ancient poop of some of the huge and astonishing creatures that once roamed Australia indicates the primary cause of their extinction around 45,000 years ago was likely a result of humans, not climate change.

Led by Monash University in Victoria, Australia and the University of Colorado Boulder, the team used information from a sediment core drilled in the Indian Ocean off the coast of southwest Australia to help reconstruct past climate and ecosystems on the continent. The core contains chronological layers of material blown and washed into the ocean, including dust, pollen, ash and spores from a fungus called Sporormiella that thrived on the dung of plant-eating mammals, said CU Boulder Professor Gifford Miller.

Miller, who participated in the study led by Sander van der Kaars of Monash University, said the sediment core allowed scientists to look back in time, in this case more than 150,000 years, spanning Earth's last full glacial cycle. Fungal spores from plant-eating mammal dung were abundant in the sediment core layers from 150,000 years ago to about 45,000 years ago, when they went into a nosedive, said Miller, a professor in the Department of Geological Sciences.

"The abundance of these spores is good evidence for a lot of large mammals on the southwestern Australian landscape up until about 45,000 years ago," he said. "Then, in a window of time lasting just a few thousand years, the megafauna population collapsed."

Comment Re:Child labor law (Score 1) 492

I had a job: maintaining my A minus grade point average in honors classes in high school. It paid not immediately in cash but instead years later in eligibility for a merit-based college scholarship. If you are trying to claim that every child ought to have two jobs, a first for scholarship eligibility and a second for cash, I fail to see how that's practical. Most nights, I was assigned too much homework to be able to complete first it and then a paper route before the subscribers expected to have their newspapers.

Comment Re:Child labor law (Score 1) 492

When I was 14 (or maybe 13) I had a paper route. Didn't need to ask my parents for permission, either.

Were you recommending sneaking out of the house, walking several blocks to the newspaper company, and putting in an application, in direct disobedience of my parents? It's been years, but I seem to remember that if I failed to let my parents know whenever I left the house, or if they vetoed it and I left anyway, I'd lose privileges once I returned home for having made them "worried sick" and "about to call the police". One such privilege was the privilege to connect my computer to their electric power and operate it on their land.

Just went and got it (actually, bought it off a classmate for $X a week until it was paid off).

With my (professionally diagnosed) social awkwardness and need to leave school immediately to catch the school bus home, I wouldn't have known how to find a classmate off whom to buy a paper route without disrupting the classroom. I wouldn't even have known that one can buy a route off someone else; in fact, I didn't know that until I read your comment.

And I'm sure that sidewalks needed to be shoveled in winter, so snow should have been an opportunity

I don't remember if this was the case when I was growing up, but nowadays, there's someone in our neighborhood who runs a snowblower on about four blocks' worth of sidewalk for free. It's hard to compete with free.

Comment Re:where's the safe space for apps (Score 1) 42

Let me make it more explicit:

Pay for a domain, web hosting, and advertising. Obtain a TLS certificate for your domain through the Let's Encrypt button of your web host's control panel. Offer your application as a self-signed apk file for download through your website, along with instructions for users to enable Unknown sources or use adb install to add the application to a device.

Comment Re:I activated my own phone on Ting (Score 1) 63

Ting is great....if you don't actually use your phone much or use the smart part of your smart phone. If you actually use your phone and need data? Their service adds up pretty damned quickly.

The last month I was on Ting it ended up costing me nearly $60 for minutes and data and I really don't use my phone that often, all it took was a sick relative and being stuck in the hospital waiting to find out what was going on to blow through the cash on their service. I want to be able to use my phone without having to worry about some unexpected event raising my costs so I ended up going to Cricket, its $70 for 2 phones with unlimited talk and text and 2.5Gb of data which I've found is plenty for watching YouTube when I'm stuck waiting somewhere.

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