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Comment Re:FrostPeas (Score 1) 1238

Reality is not in the least bit influenced by disillusions. You can denounce it all you want, but it doesn't change even slightly by tagging it "liberal bias." You might as well call it a walrus. It just doesn't worry if its is butt looks big in a skirt. That board should do more finger painting and potty training instead.

Comment Re:The carriers have won...here's an OLD idea... (Score 1) 196

Lets make it ILLEGAL for corporate blood sucker carriers to monopolize any free markets and terms. Lets get retro and smash AT&T back into a bunch of Baby Bells, again. Then we'll hear a pin drop for a better price, better service, and a Sprint policy of correcting any billing overcharges because the customer is always right. While were at it, we'll turn back the clock to before Verizon contracts were spawned by Satan...then lets....I better quit while I'm ahead, before any nudity or violence occurs.

User Journal

Journal Journal: Sprint, Walmart launch Common Cents mobile

As reported on Broad Band DSL Reports.com, Sprint and Walmart launch Common Cents mobile - You can call it 'Common Cents' or 'Boost' or 'Virgin' or 'Sprint', it is still not a great deal. Prepay Common Cents cellular at .07 a minute / per text still boils down to a $20/mo. bottom line, for some, since your minutes may expire monthly. Unused time and inactive phone numbe

Submission + - Sprint, Walmart launch Common Cents mobile (broadbandreports.com)

Bob_Who writes: As reported on BroadBandRreports, Sprint and Walmart launch Common Cents mobile. Can call it Common Cents or Boost or Virgin or Sprint, its still not as good a deal as you think. Prepay Common Cents cellular at .07 a minute / per text still boils down to $20/mo. bottom line, for some, since your minutes may expire monthly. Its half of the 39.99*/mo price point on my Sprint two year contract (*$46 or so, after surcharges & fees). We must, once again, buy another unnecessary cellphone to add to our collection of toxic land fill. The fact that my old Sprint phone can't be used on this SPRINT network is not only ludicrous, it should be a crime and as harshly dealt with as an oil spill.

No matter how you slice and dice it, cellular is and will always be a TOTAL RIP OFF because it is in the hands of a few corporate monsters who have claimed the bandwidth and have every intention of extorting every possible penny from the market until our dying day, or thereafter, if possible. Until we actually have competition in the market, or we rewrite the LAW we are paying too much.

Gouging the citizens for the benefit of the shareholders may be legal and ethical, but IMHO its immoral and uncivilized to screw the 'many' for the benefit of the 'few'.

Ultimately, we need to change all corporate commerce, or else "eat the rich" will be the new populous slogan.

Hardware Hacking

Submission + - Ask Slashdot: Home hard drive storage 1

i_ate_god writes: I download a lot of 720/1080p videos, and I also produce a lot of raw uncompressed video. I have run out of slots to put in harddrives across two computers. I need (re: want) access to my files at all times (over a network is fine), especially since I maintain a library of what I've got on the TV computer. I don't want to have swappable USB drives, I want all hard drives available all the time on my network. I'm assuming that, since it's on a network, I won't need 16,000 RPM drives and thus I'm hoping a solution exists that can be moderately quiet and/or hidden away somewhere and still keep somewhat cool. So Slashdot, what have you done?
Crime

Judge Orders Gizmodo Search Warrant Unsealed 526

gyrogeerloose writes "The same judge who issued the warrant to search Gizmodo editor Jason Chen's apartment has now ordered it unsealed, ruling against the San Mateo County district attorney's office which had argued that unsealing the documents may compromise the investigation." You can read the entire affidavit here (PDF). It has a detailed description of the police investigation that led to the seizure of Chen's computers. It turns out Steve Jobs personally requested that the phone be returned, prompting Gizmodo's Brian Lam to try negotiating for a public acknowledgment that the phone was real. Apple was tipped off to the man who found/stole the prototype by his roommate.

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