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Cloud Businesses Microsoft

Adobe To Run Some Of Its Creative Cloud Services On Azure (zdnet.com) 17

Adobe will offer its Adobe Creative Cloud, Marketing Cloud, and Document Cloud hosted on Microsoft's Azure, the company said today, as part of a deal with Microsoft. ZDNet adds: Some of Adobe's subscription services for creative professionals currently are hosted on Amazon's AWS. It's not clear from Microsoft's announcement of its new Adobe deal whether Adobe's Creative Cloud, Marketing Cloud, and Document Cloud will run on any other cloud backbones, with Azure as a secondary option or choice. I've asked Microsoft, and heard back from a spokesperson that today's deal is not exclusive, but that's all I know at this point. Work is underway to move these services to the Azure cloud, a spokesperson confirmed, with more information on this coming in the next few months.
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Adobe To Run Some Of Its Creative Cloud Services On Azure

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  • I have to give a big so what. I know we suppose to hate Microsoft and I have no love for Azure. But so what, it is Adobe who will need to deal with the consequences more than the users of the services.

    • I have to give a big so what. I know we suppose to hate Microsoft and I have no love for Azure. But so what, it is Adobe who will need to deal with the consequences more than the users of the services.

      Exactly.

      Besides, maybe with a little luck, MSFT will nickel-and-dime Adobe hard-core along the way, and they become victims of the same rental scheme they've inflicted on their own customer base. Couldn't happen to a more deserving company, really.

      • by RDW ( 41497 )

        Besides, maybe with a little luck, MSFT will nickel-and-dime Adobe hard-core along the way, and they become victims of the same rental scheme they've inflicted on their own customer base. Couldn't happen to a more deserving company, really.

        I'm also hoping Affinity will eat their lunch with reasonably priced software with perpetual licenses. So far they have excellent Photoshop and Illustrator alternatives for Mac, with a DTP and DAM package to come. Windows versions are on the way, with Designer (cf Illustrator) already in beta: http://affinity.serif.com/ [serif.com]

    • by hey! ( 33014 )

      A properly designed system shouldn't be highly dependent upon any kind of persistence layer, although if you follow the provider's example programs you'll tend to spread dependencies through your code. But a smart designer hides that all away deep down in some kind of abstraction.

      A demonstration of exactly how little you are dependent on a vendor is probably a very good thing, if you're a big customer. Oh, we'll run *this* part of our product on the other guy's cloud service and boom. It happens. Shows t

  • want software to work right, anyone else like the cloud shoved down their throat? Glad they are teaming up with another company doing the same...
    • I was just thinking about this a bit...

      I toy around with CG and artistic software, but aside from a (now-ancient) copy of Photoshop, I usually do not bother with Adobe's products anymore precisely because of The Cloud (cue angelic chorals and a deep majestic voice enunciating every syllable...)

      Not that I hate the whole cloudy thing per se - it has its use cases... but digital artwork ain't one of them, especially for the hobbyist.

      Renting render farm time? Okay, that's a good thing to have. OTOH, Fiddling wi

      • by Junta ( 36770 )

        It's an inefficiency that is very intentional.

        The software industry realized that for a lot of their users, they couldn't extract upgrade licenses from customers readily because they had already done *too* good a job. Functionality wise, a lot of people don't need anything newer than Photoshop 6 (released 16 years ago). A lot of people could use Office 97. Of course some things have slowly evolved technology wise that *ultimately makes people need updates and there's some forced updates (e.g. fun incompa

      • by quetwo ( 1203948 )

        You do realize that you still run all the Adobe software on your local computer -- the only thing that makes it "the cloud" is that it includes a document management and file storage piece. Oh, and I think /some/ settings are shared across installs of the software.

        When they switched to this model, they also changed it so you rent the software instead of purchase it. The advantage is that they push updates more frequently, but you are paying a monthly fee for it.

      • I already have hella powerful machinery and oceans of storage space at home... the hell do I need to clog up my bandwidth (and in my case, bandwidth allocation thanks to Sat. Internet) just so that Adobe can rent their software instead of buying it?

        You don't. This is so people don't have to shell out for "hella powerful machinery" and "oceans of storage space" just to do these things. It's even better for companies because they don't need to maintain hardware and buy highend desktops and laptops. They have a subscription for the software (rather than re-purchasing annually) and a decent internet connection and then they can use that software on pretty much any system and aren't tied to the systems to which the software is licensed.

        And I totally get t

  • by Anonymous Coward

    We might get dome decent interop between microsoft products and pdf?

  • This news feels like a Demotivational Teamwork poster come to life.

The only difference between a car salesman and a computer salesman is that the car salesman knows he's lying.

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