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The Internet

Joining the Global Village 175

Sandeep writes "This article tells of an initiative in rural India, to provide internet access for farmers. The initiative is called e-choupal, a name taken from the Hindi name for village square. An incongruous image when you consider they still use bullock carts for carrying the produce..."
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Joining the Global Village

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  • by I'm back ( 737470 ) on Saturday January 03, 2004 @04:09AM (#7866042)
    Since all the west seems interested in is providing them with internet access, of all things, here are some links the farmers might be interested in. How to get clean water [whm.org.au], avoiding GM crops [indiatogether.org] and reducing pesticide use [ourplanet.com].
    • by Gumshoe ( 191490 ) on Saturday January 03, 2004 @04:32AM (#7866113) Journal
      Since all the west seems interested in is providing them with internet access, of all things,


      I'm I the only one who finds it hilarious that you question the usefulness of the Internet for these farmers and yet provide links to web sites providing information that you feel is more germaine. I think you've just answered your own question about whether the Internet is useful or not.
      • I'm I the only one who finds it hilarious that you question the usefulness of the Internet for these farmers and yet provide links to web sites providing information that you feel is more germaine. I think you've just answered your own question about whether the Internet is useful or not.

        He was being ironic, Gumshoe ;)

      • Yes. Because the rest of us, who are reading the information on this web page, can go to those web pages he mentioned, see what he's talking about, and gain information, and perhaps a bit of understanding.

        Whereas the farmers who still don't have an internet connection will still be completely clueless as to even the existence of /., and therefore, it isn't ironic that it's not more useful to them. The information was provided to us, not them, as an attempt to go "Hrm. Maybe if we did this instead of giving
      • an 'obtuse' triangle at that.

        The man was suggesting that if they're to have access to the net, they may as well get some utility out of it.

        He was also being sarcastic as evidenced by his posting of links here were very few indian farmers are likely to view them.

        I might suggest you buy a little more ram for 'upstairs' and perhaps a processor that supports MMX instructions in hardware.
    • by hashinclude ( 192717 ) <`moc.edulcnihsah' `ta' `todhsals'> on Saturday January 03, 2004 @05:58AM (#7866322) Homepage
      Will you for a moment think of "internet access" as something other than Spam, pr0n and /. ?

      (of course, this is /.; oh well)

      The aim is not to provide "internet access". The aim is to provide farmers with live prices, so that they can sell accordingly. A similar project is on at IIT Kanpur (Digital Mandi -- see http://www.iitk.ac.in/MLAsia/digimandi.htm)

      The rationale is that, because (a) farmers (i.e. producers) are not aware of what the current market price is, and (b) $BROKER is going to try to maximize profit by any means, the farmers usually end up selling there wares for waaaaaaaay less than the current market price. The diff is such that market price is anywhere between 2 to 5 times the price the farmers get.

      Considering how many farmers have very little cash to spend (even by Indian standards), every extra buck per kilo they make is A Good Thing (tm)

      [[ Yes, I am an Indian, living here for *quite* some time, and am aware of these problems despite reading /. ]]
    • Heaven save us from luddite slashdotters. India can barely feed itself and GM crops stand on the horizon to make food cheap and abundant. That is if they ever get the chance. The Chicken Littles of the world would rather see people starve.
    • Since all the west seems interested in is providing them with internet access,

      Did you RTFA, or did your trollbox just cough this up? "West", my ass. It is an Indian company doing this. Don't you think the locals there have some right to use this technology as they see fit?

  • by j-pimp ( 177072 ) <zippy1981@@@gmail...com> on Saturday January 03, 2004 @04:10AM (#7866047) Homepage Journal
    You would think the editors would remember to add a parody of NYT, free registration required!! Then again whats wrong with me for wanting to rtfa. I must be new here.
  • by Anonymous Coward
    cause in firebird this line: div id="Layer1" style="HEIGHT: 235px; LEFT: 383px; POSITION: absolute; TOP: 98px; WIDTH: 388px; Z-INDEX: 1" puts a whacking big flash animation in front of the text :/
  • Couple of things: (Score:1, Insightful)

    by Anonymous Coward
    1) This article was in BusinessWeek about 2 months ago... Old news... Interesting use of technology.

    2) I think I can speak for a significant portion of the /. membership when I say - ENOUGH WITH THE NY TIMES ARTICLES. We're sick of screwing around with the speed bump that they call "Registration". It's assinine, and we need to recognize it and tell the site that they can keep their precious news to themselves. We'll take our 250,000 users and visit some place with the same damn news - San Jose anyone?
  • Can somebody paste the article? I can't view the damm thing using Mozilla/Firebird 0.7
    • by Anonymous Coward
      That page layout is so brilliant that it manages to mangle output in both Konqueror and Mozilla. Opera did nicely though, and here's the output from the front page:

      e-Choupal, the unique web based initiative of ITC's International Business Division, offers the Farmers of India all the information, products and services they need to enhance farm productivity, improve farm-gate price realisation and cut transaction costs. Farmers can access latest local and global information on weather, scientific farm

  • like no surfing while driving in the front seat of your oxen cart.
  • India has 13 official languages ... then why is it in hindi ?...

    Anyway it will take more than this to get india online to the grass (Uhh...crop) roots
    • Because Hindi is

      (a) The "official" national language
      (b) Everyone here has a rudimentary knowledge of hindi, and can therefore understand to a certain extent
      (c) Support for Indic languages is not yet complete, Hindi is one of the better supported ones

      Take your pick.

      (YES, IAAIII)
      • Also the experiment was confined to a single state. When they perform a similar experiment in South India they will probably have to translate into the local language, but then again this is easily done.
      • "Everyone here has a rudimentary knowledge of hindi"

        *looks around* First I have to learn linux to keep up with you guys, then some form of programming just to understand half of what goes on here at slashdot... not to mention all those years studying astrophysics, chemistry, mathematics, robotics.... and now I discover that I will have to learn hindi as well! Oh, the ever-changing face of the nerd. At least we all still have pimples.
    • FYI, 18, not 13.
  • by segment ( 695309 ) <`gro.xirtilop' `ta' `lis'> on Saturday January 03, 2004 @04:33AM (#7866115) Homepage Journal
    Once Palm gets a whiff of this they'll be selling BILLIONS of Farm Pilots... No wait. Maybe I should invest in Redhat. The potential Redhat Farmix. Wow I don't know about you but I'm excited
  • Here's the story... (Score:5, Interesting)

    by Saeed al-Sahaf ( 665390 ) on Saturday January 03, 2004 @04:39AM (#7866135) Homepage
    Oh this is GREAT, like we have not all han enough of the H1-B thing and outsourcing... Now all the farmers will be doing our coding and customer service...

    But seriously there are great things that small farmers can do with connectivity, it has a great possibility to increase these peoples quality of life.

    Fo those who do not wish to deal with the sign-in process...

    Here it is:

    Indian Soybean Farmers Join the Global Village By AMY WALDMAN

    Published: January 1, 2004

    TIHI, India -- At least once a day in this village of 2,500 people, Ravi Sham Choudhry turns on the computer in his front room and logs in to the Web site of the Chicago Board of Trade.

    He has the dirt of a farmer under his fingernails and pecks slowly at the keys. But he knows what he wants: the prices for soybean commodity futures.

    A drop in prices on the Chicago Board, shown in red, could augur a drop in prices here, meaning that he and fellow soybean farmers should sell their crop now. An increase there argues that the farmers should wait for prices to rise.

    "If it goes up there, it goes up here," Mr. Choudhry said. The correlation is rough but real. Real, too, is the link between farmers in rural central India and around the globe, thanks to a company's innovation.

    The concept is the e-choupal, taken from the Hindi word for village square, or gathering place. The twist is the "e": providing a computer and Internet connections for farmers to gather around. Mr. Choudhry supervises the project for Tihi and several nearby villages.

    E-choupal allows the farmers to check both futures prices across the globe and local prices before going to market. It gives them access to local weather conditions, soil-testing techniques and other expert knowledge that will increase their productivity.

    Nonprofit organizations have tried similar initiatives but none have achieved anywhere near the scale that e-choupals have. There are now 1,700 in this state, Madhya Pradesh, and 3,000 total in India. They are serving 18,000 villages, reaching up to 1.8 million farmers.

    As a result, say those who have studied the concept, the company behind e-choupals, ITC Ltd., has done as much as anyone to bridge India's vast digital divide: most of its one billion people have no access to the technology developed by some of their fellow Indians, whether in Bangalore or Silicon Valley.

    E-choupals may offer a model for all developing countries.

    "It is a new form of liberation," C. K. Prahalad, who led a case study on e-choupals for the University of Michigan Business School, said of the transparency and access to information they give farmers.

    More than two-thirds of India's people still depend on agriculture for their livelihoods. With little chance of the huge manufacturing boom that has employed many rural poor in China, the challenge is to increase farmers' productivity.

    Even more tantalizing, ITC now has the means to reach into some of India's 600,000 villages, where 72 percent of the people live and where the greatest potential markets lie. Most businesses never venture to an area with fewer than 5,000 people, said ITC's chairman, Y. C. Deveshwar.

    Eventually the company expects to sell everything from microcredit to tractors via e-choupals -- and hopes to use them to become the Wal-Mart of India, Mr. Deveshwar told shareholders this year.

    "We are laying infrastructure in a sense," Mr. Deveshwar said. Sixty companies have already taken part in a pilot project to sell services and goods, from insurance to seeds to motorbikes to biscuits, through ITC.

    By overcoming the infrastructure problems that have hampered progress in India's villages in the past -- ITC decided to use satellites and solar panels, for instance, to sidestep the state's shaky power supply and lack of phone lines -- and by offering full Internet service on the computers, the company has instantly broadened villagers' horizons.

    "We never dreamed of this, that our vi

    • Forget it. Programming is like doing mathmatics. Soon, everyone that can understand it, will use programming like an everyday tool for their own daily activities. In fact, I'm sure that schools around the world will have programming added in as a basic staple of education.

      May I remind the rest of you coders out their to find another line or work. Stop bitching about it and face reality.

      Hell, just as having experience using the computer was a job requirement for most white-collar positions in the 90s...so
      • Forget it. Programming is like doing mathmatics. Soon, everyone that can understand it, will use programming like an everyday tool for their own daily activities. In fact, I'm sure that schools around the world will have programming added in as a basic staple of education.

        YUP! I think in the future, the only real computer jobs will be networking.

  • by demonhold ( 735615 ) on Saturday January 03, 2004 @04:43AM (#7866156) Journal
    Well, it seems that Indian powers that be have focused on making India a tech savvy country, providing programming education to her inhabitants... that's a good thing... the problem is that when you deal in selling cheap sooner or later some other will sell even cheaper.

    What will happen to all these people when some African, East Asian, or emerging former Soviet republic offer the same services with the same quality at a lower cost.

    ON the other hand, India should definitely do something to feed most of her population, tear down the caste system (yeah, India may be the most populous democracy in the world, but a very unjust, quite corrupt one), and stop spending so much money on the more than morally unsound purpose of eventually blowing Pakistan to pieces and try to challenge China as the local superpower. This could also be applied to Pakistan and other countries in the area.

    Many will call me a troll, but the truth is that is sad to see such a wonderful people suffer so much under the hands of such corrupt, incompetent leadership.

    As many Non-gov agencies will tell you in order to help someone you have to feed him and provide him with clothing and shelter first. Then you can start thinking about an education.

    • Ah another post modded insightful, when it is obvious that the poster did not read the article.

      This is an initiative by a private company, with the aim of making money, and they are making it. If it was a waste of money, they would not do it. They are using this e-choupal as a place to allow people to get information, and increase customer(read farmer) footfall, so they can sell them seeds, tractors etc.Even the providing of information part is run as a business in the franchise model.

      As, for the benefit
    • As many Non-gov agencies will tell you in order to help someone you have to feed him and provide him with clothing and shelter first. Then you can start thinking about an education.

      My cynical and distrustful self would think it only natural for the non-gov't agencies (charities, food programmes, medical aid organisations) to say this, because once these people are able to provide for themselves, they will no longer need said organisations. I know I am being a bit too cynical here, and such organisations d

      • yeah

        you're right there!!!

        I should've thought of it. I guessed that having grown up in the Canary Islands, a European site a mere 90 miles from Africa, and having seen the effects of non-democratic govt combined with hunger and repression, as it's the case of most African states, so near clouds my reasoning a little bit.

        I used to think that access to info, such as the internet, would soon translate into more aware people that would afterwards bring some sort of change in their societies. The experiences
        • I used to think that access to info, such as the internet, would soon translate into more aware people that would afterwards bring some sort of change in their societies.

          The Internet access provided to these Indian farmers servers a much more mundane purpose: it is supposed to help them to be better farmers.

          Information is not the main driver for change, prosperity is. Poor and hungry subjects are easily controlled, whereas relatively wealthy people are much less inclined to aid a dictator or sit idly b

    • I got karma to spare so here goes..

      Please, for the millionth time, anytime you see another article about India, dont go all mushy eyed about its billion residents going hungry to bed every night, the cruelties of its caste system, blah..blah and blah. These things will change as time moves forward. It wont be a revolution, more like a natural progression as the old habits die, and the old system dies along with it. The young people of this country are as progressive and liberal like the rest of their count
    • The new Indian middle class [economist.com] growing up on technological jobs are actually least likely support the caste system or have religious hatred.

    • As many Non-gov agencies will tell you in order to help someone you have to feed him and provide him with clothing and shelter first. Then you can start thinking about an education. Nice troll. You had me hooked until that line. Like NGO's can provide food and shelter for 800 Million people.
  • Change (Score:5, Interesting)

    by trublaha ( 650819 ) on Saturday January 03, 2004 @04:45AM (#7866163)

    A friend of mine went to several Indian villages to do a documentary and tells me that there are many projects initiated by the government to bring modern ideas and methods to villages that have functioned, more or less, the same way for hundreds of years.

    These projects are bringing new ideas and ways of thinking to the villagers (like gender equality), but at the same rate, many of the young people of the village are being encouraged more and more to leave the country and find their fortune in the city.

    Now will this internet-access for all encourage young people to stay in the country, doing all of their work and research online; or, will this extra exposure encourage more to leave? I'd be interested to hear others' views on this.

    • Unless something is different than the way it was in the past, the urban migration will still happen.

      Eventually, with the introduction of new farming methods, fewer people are needed to do the same amount of work. The displaced people will have to go somewhere, do something.
    • Now will this internet-access for all encourage young people to stay in the country, doing all of their work and research online; or, will this extra exposure encourage more to leave? I'd be interested to hear others' views on this.

      At some level, this type of information access may accelerate the flight of the young from rural areas. Increasing the productivity of Indian farmers means the India needs fewer farmers. This has good and bad effects.

      On the one hand, increasing the profitability and produ
      • All your comments rate "insightful", but you overlooked a small point. Tech tends to concentrate in urban centers because that's where the talent pool is. (And of course, the talent is available only in urban centers because that's where the jobs are. It's a vicious circle, as the Silicon Valley real-estate market attests.) As computing and communication technology becomes more and more pervasive, it becomes more practical to look beyond the Silicon Valleys and Bangalores to locate your software engineering
        • But you overlooked a small point. Tech tends to concentrate in urban centers because that's where the talent pool is. (And of course, the talent is available only in urban centers because that's where the jobs are.

          Good point! You are right that engineering/programming jobs will flow into urban areas because of the high concentration of educated people and that educated people will flow into urban areas because of the high concentration of high-paying jobs. Yet telecommuting enables many other types of
  • This a great idea in principle but who's paying for it? Did they suddenly magic down the cost of internet access cos if they made it that low that people in a rural village in India can afford the isp charges then sign me up to their programme!! Is it like many other western inititatives to help foreign countries, give them it all for what appears like a dream but the hidden charges and interest will leave them crippled later? Give them the net to help them make a profit then take that profit from them in
    • This a great idea in principle but who's paying for it?
      In the great /. tradition, neither you nor the moderator who modded you insightful read the article.
      This is not a govt. initiative. This is an initiative by a private company who wants to become the wall-mart of India for the rural areas. So, they figure they will open something call "e-choupal", which will serve as an information center and get the "customers" to visit. Of course they run it like a franchise model, they provide the equipment, trai
      • Misses ading a supporting link above
        http://www.mahindrausa.com/About/history.as px
      • I did read the article and not once did I say In my previous post that I thought it was a government initiative. Private enterprise is just as if not more so guilty of using tempting methods of getting people to use their services only to apply high or hidden charges once their customers enterpises take off. Specially more-so in countries less fortunate than our own. Its the way cpaitalism has been running the world for eons IMO
        • you are right. But, at the same time you must remember, that if the private company does not provide value, they will not make money. There is no govt. subsidy here.

          And, believe me Indian farmer(for that matter small farmers everywhere even in USA) knows the value of money.
  • great (Score:3, Interesting)

    by DNS-and-BIND ( 461968 ) on Saturday January 03, 2004 @05:03AM (#7866209) Homepage
    Is it really a good idea to disrupt these peoples' traditional way of life, so that they can download pornography? That's what'll happen, make no mistake. The do-gooders implementing this change don't care a whit for the traditional way of life, and in fact want to destroy it altogether because it doesn't fit into their "modern standards". The children will see a larger world outside their village, and quite naturally won't want to live in a mud hut when they can see everyone else in the world is living in skyscrapers.
    • Re:great (Score:3, Insightful)

      by AtomicBomb ( 173897 )
      >>Is it really a good idea to disrupt these peoples'
      >>traditional way of life, so that they can download >>pornography?
      It is an interesting question... A friend of mine come back from a half year trip for some comparative study about rural development in the Third World, in which he teamed up with the Oxfam volunteers in many parts of China, India, and Vietnam. The conclusion was the more the villagers know about the external world (but cannot join it), the more desperate they are.

      For e
    • I think it is THEIR CHOICE whether they leave their "traiditional way of life". No one is forcing them to.
  • India is going to host the Commonwealth Games 2010 [cwgdelhi2010.com] (72 Countries, including Canada) in New Delhi, after having won over Hamilton's (Canada)desire to do the same. [hamilton2010.ca] The hosting of the games is going to bring about some major and positive changes to Delhi, and the Sports program in India. And one of the selling points was that the Bid Committee said India should have a chance to demonstrate the State of IT in India on the World Stage ... [cwgdelhi2010.com]

    Next on the agenda is to bid for the Olympics 2016 ... [gamesbids.com] Just imagine

  • or e-bullocks
  • We also do internet access for those who cannot afford it. Bullocks would work ..

    We use a USB memory stick as a physical carrier for internet data - Email and (cached) web access. Check it out at wizzy.org.za [wizzy.org.za] - based out of South Africa, but with an open-source CD download at the site above.

    Our main carrier protocol is UUCP [uucp.org] Cheers, Andy!

  • They will finally have population control that works...Anyone who has taken economic development will tell you...that the 2 of the main causes of poverty is high population growth and lack education....With the internet comes free education(which comes not only in form or learning new things but also getting help from places like webmd to treat common problems...and with it also comes poplation control...how? well porn...well actuall the main cause of poluation growth is a lack of development which causes c
  • by rdmiller3 ( 29465 ) on Saturday January 03, 2004 @09:36AM (#7866700) Journal
    Sure, Internet connectivity can help farmers. Access to information can help anyone. But what's wrong with a bullock cart?

    An ox can go through narrow streets and flooded fields. It can pull. It can carry. Its requirements are easily found and inexpensive. A simple cart can be built and maintained by one's self and local craftsmen with no need for dealer-authorized training nor expensive tools which might only work on one kind of cart.

    And how many people ever get run over by ox carts? Do you have any idea what happens to an automobile's driver and passengers after they've rounded a blind corner and hit somebody in a remote Indian village?

  • The Wired Jungle (Score:3, Interesting)

    by AndroidCat ( 229562 ) on Saturday January 03, 2004 @10:26AM (#7866830) Homepage
    Here's another story about 'netting remote cultures: Remote jungle tribe.com [ananova.com]

    (I was putting together a submission for Slashdot, but never got around to it, and now I can't find my notes. Argh!)

    Some might think that tossing the Internet (5 whole laptops!) would be a violation of some sort of nanny Prime Directive and bad for them.

    Sadly, they're already in a bad way with the common problems of marginalized indigenous cultures shoved off their land: alcohol, suicide, solvent abuse, etc. I doubt five computers and Internet could make things any worse!

    The word they created, in their Tupi language, translates as "where you can put words, documents and knowledge".
    And lose them too, fsck, fsck! *sigh* I had some good points and links. I'll go complete my morning coffevolution and if I find them, I'll submit it.
  • By turning all their farmers into internet addicts, the resulting famines can cause India to decay to the point where they're not as much of an outsourcing threat any more!
  • What's incongruous about it? If bullock carts get the job of getting produce to market done, why not? If farms are located close to consumers and consumers have the know-how to prepare their own meals, that seems like an efficient solution, in particular give how cheap labor is in India.

    A high-tech information infrastructure doesn't necessitate US-style agriculture, US-style food consumption patterns, or US-style city planning. China and India are now doing much of the manufacturing that the US used to d
    • by daemonc ( 145175 )
      When asked what he thought about western civilization, Mahatma Gandhi replied, "I think it would be a good idea."

      Not everyone's idea of civilization is the same. People in India may wonder how ass-backwards we are here, when they learn that we are using gas-guzzling air-polluting machines to transport our produce to the market.
  • I work on a project that looks to be similar to this. It's called RANET ( http://www.ranetproject.net ), basically we transmit weather,climate and other information to rural populations in those parts of the world using a digital radio satellite system (that happens to carry a data channel). It's similar to the technology that XM Radio uses here in the States. The radio can be hooked up to a computer (which can be run off a solar panel and car battery). Usually these computers and radios are setup at lo
  • Argh! (Score:3, Insightful)

    by Quixote ( 154172 ) on Saturday January 03, 2004 @11:46AM (#7867144) Homepage Journal
    Let me summarise the responses:
    • But they don't have clean water/food/underwear: that should come first!
    • What about poverty? Internet doesn't put bread on the plate!
    • Reminds me of "let them have cake!"
    • The priorities are all wrong! Billions of Indians are going hungry!
    • Oh great! Now the farmers in India will be taking jobs from the farmers in Iowa
    • I, for one, welcome our new Indian farmer overlords

    Now, please allow me to rant.

    Who the f*ck are you to sit in your comfy little chair (in, most probably, your parents' basement) and pass judgement on these people 9,000 miles away (from US)? Don't you think that the people in India care about poverty just a little bit more than you do? If the poverty in India does bother you so much, then sell your earthly possessions, take the first flight to India that you can get, and go live in a village and help them out, OK? Don't sit around outside, trying to lecture them.

    India is not the US (nor is it UK, Australia, France, Germany, etc.). They have their own problems, and want to come up with their own solutions. LET THEM EXPERIMENT! Don't pass judgement; if you can help, then, by all means, please do so; if not, then S.T.F.U.!

    Assuming you naysayers live in the USA, here are some statistics for you (from this site [oneworld.org]:

    • 20% of all America's children live below the poverty line; 43.8% of America's black children live below the poverty line
    • 4,000 children in the USA will be murdered by their parents this year
    • A child born in New York today is less likely to live to 5 than a child born in Shanghai
    • A gun takes the life of a child every 2 hours in the USA; 50,000 children were killed by firearms between 1979 and 1991 -- same as US casualties in the Vietnam War
    • On average, one out of every three Americans - 34.2 percent of all people in the United States - are officially classified as living in poverty at least 2 months out of the year. (source: U.S. Census Bureau, Dynamics of Economic Well-Being: Poverty 1996-1999, July 2003.)

    So, please tell me: why should the US be spending any money on weapons, Internet, Reality TV, etc. etc. when there is so much child poverty? Are you running around in your neighborhoods, telling poor folks not to spend any money on gifts/computers/TV, until they have gotten out of poverty? If not, then please start lecturing in your neighborhood first, before lecturing some people 9,000 miles away.

    Thank you.

    • For some definition of the proverty line... I've known a few who lived below the poverty line. Somehow they still had a TV in the house. Somehow their parents still found money for drinks at the bar... I've even known parents who choose to live below the poverty line despite the ability to make more money because time with their kids was worth more to them than money. (Not many) No it isn't easy, but you can live just fine on a lot less than the poverty line if you get your prioritys straight. I woul

    • Define where the poverty line is. The average family that is living completly off the rest of society has at least one car, cable TV, a VCR, a telephone, heat in the winter, and airconditioning in the summer.( I know a lot of people in the north don't have AC because they don't need it and a lot of people in large cities don't drive, this is the average) People in poverty are generally defined in the US as the bottom 20%. That is why the number of children is always around 20% give or take a few depending
  • . . . and his incessant fetish for third-world countries?

    Why is failure to produce so attractive to him ?

    No other editor posts so many stories dealing with technology X being introduced on a very small scale to shithole country Y.

  • WTF? you cant even get high speed internet in all areas of america, BUT, you are goign to wire up a whole country when half of the population doesn't care/cant afford computers??
  • I remember reading an article (and submitting same) about "Bringing Remote Alaskan Villages into the Digital Age" [alaska-freegold.com] "Philadelphia University Awarded $600,000 by National Science Foundation to Bring Remote Alaskan Villages into the Digital Age" "With this funding the team hopes to supply technology hardware, software and instruction for the village so, as Dinero puts it, "The Nets'aii Gwich'in can survive in this modern world while continuing to embrace their culture and traditional way of life. And, hopefull

Never tell people how to do things. Tell them WHAT to do and they will surprise you with their ingenuity. -- Gen. George S. Patton, Jr.

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