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Comment Re:Idiocy (Score 1) 59

Remember that your router is limited to 1W output (FCC limits in the US for all 2.4Ghz and 5Ghz devices), fired in every direction. At a mere 1 meter away from the router, even if your cell is placed facing the router (to have maximim surface area), and assuming 100% efficiency... your cell would harvest about 0.0004 watts of charging power.

But it will not be 100% efficient. Your cell will not be within 1 meter of the router most of the time. This entire idea is ludicrous, and anyone thinking that it's a great idea does not know much about physics.

Time for a round of choose the hypothesis:

#1 - Out of the 10,000+ engineers working for Apple, not even one of them knows about physics.

#2 - At least one of them knows not only about physics, but also some other type of technology that would actually validate the patent filed (somehow).

#3 - Patents for patents sake. Even fake news is still a (click) revenue generator. Oh, and is there an app for patents yet? 'Cause we need some patenty app goodness!

Ironic how "dumb" phones have removable batteries that last for a week, and "smart" phones have non-removable batteries that struggle to last a day.

You spelled month wrong ;) My last feature phone lasted 4 weeks on a charge when it was new, and was contemporary with the iPhone 1, but the feature phone had 3G.

Submission + - SPAM: Higher sodium intake associated with lower blood pressure. You read that right.

schwit1 writes: In another blow against decades of accepted medical wisdom, one of the most prestigious, long-running studies reports that lowering sodium intake doesn’t reduce blood pressure.

The study also implies that most Americans are consuming a perfectly healthy amount of salt, the main source of sodium. But those who are salt-sensitive, about 20 to 25 percent of the population, still need to restrict salt intake.

Consuming fewer than 2,500 milligrams of sodium daily is actually associated with higher blood pressure, according to the Framingham Offspring Study report, given today. The American Heart Association recommends consuming no more than 2,300 milligrams of sodium daily, equal to a teaspoon of ordinary iodized table salt.

High blood pressure is a known risk factor for heart disease and stroke. Hence, lowering salt intake is supposed to lower blood pressure and thus reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease and stroke. But the study found that supposition to be unfounded.

Moreover, the lowest blood pressure was recorded by those who consumed 4,000 milligrams or more a day — amounts considered dangerously high by medical authorities such as the American Heart Association.

Link to Original Source

Comment Re:COBOL isn't hard to learn (Score 4, Interesting) 293

Indeed. If there is a market for COBOL programmers (and it's clear there is), then the obvious solution is for unis and colleges to spit out more COBOL-literate CS graduates. Honestly, if I was ten years younger, I'd probably delve into it myself. It is, after all, just a programming language, and hardly on the same level of trying to learn Sanskrit.

As long as you have a real fall-back so your career doesn't dead end. What can easily happen is that you do X then more of X because it's the only place you get a salary/career development until you've done X so long nobody will really hire you for anything else. I see this with for example some SAP consultants, essentially SAP customers want to hire you for your SAP experience and the rest of the world doesn't care that you have a general IT degree 5 or 10 years ago because your experience is all SAP-specific and they don't run SAP.

Now they're probably safe since that ERP is burrowed so deep into many companies they'll never get out, but for something like COBOL you could end up doing it for some years and then the legacy system is shut down and nobody wants to give you anything but a junior non-COBOL position. That is if they'll even hire you or if they'd rather have a recent college graduate. Or you might have to relocate to find one of those increasingly rare positions that actually value your COBOL experience, which of course only makes it harder at the next crossroads.

If you write cell phone apps as a hobby and can show them a portfolio or something, maybe you'll get away with it. No, you're not a dinosaur who only knows an outdated language and best practices from 50 years ago. Or some other way to be able to transition away from that COBOL career more smoothly. Some of my older colleagues noted that the parking inspector at work used to be COBOL programmer some 20 years ago, they updated their skillset and apparently he didn't.

Submission + - Spying on Students in the Classroom (eff.org)

schwit1 writes: It seems a day doesn’t go by without another report of a company monitoring what we do on the Internet and selling that data to generate more revenue. And now the Electronic Frontier Foundation (EFF) has examined what happens to the data that's collected from students using technology in the classroom. They released the results of an extensive survey covering students in grades K-12.

What they found was that little work has been done to protect the privacy of the student information that is collected from both the classroom and from using the online software the schools issue for use at home on the students' own devices. They found that while many school districts have embraced technology and all of the benefits it can bring to the schools and students, often little thought has been given to one of the unintended consequences of this: the students' privacy.

The study was very extensive and took two years to complete. Virtually everything was examined, including what's being done along each point from the suppliers of hardware and software and the cloud services, to the schools and the students. They found that lots of data is being collected without permission and that it's easy for outside companies to access the data. They also discovered that there's little to prevent suppliers from sharing data with others, including advertisers.

Submission + - SmartThings Has Access to Tens of Thousands of Private GitHub Repos (reddit.com)

An anonymous reader writes: After Samsung acquired SmartThings for a cool $200 million a few years ago, the company has been aggressively pushing for developers to enable GitHub access. At one time, the company boasted it had more than 20,000 developers on the platform. What most of those developers do not know is that the SmartThings integration is a blanket read on all repositories in your account. Why GitHub makes this an option, I have no idea. With all the turmoil over at Samsung lately, do you want that company to have access to all of your GitHub repositories? Have you checked what else has access to your repos lately?

Submission + - Google Loses Top Hardware Executive

randomErr writes: David Foster joined Alphabet Inc.'s Google in October as part of its aggressive hardware effort has left the company. As the vice president of hardware product development he worked on the launch of the Pixel smartphone and Home speaker. Both of which are competitors to the Amazon Echo, Foster's previous employer. Google will not comment on why he is leaving.

Comment Mistake. Or not. Is Windows 10 an OS or Spyware? (Score 1) 45

I would never use Windows 10 except connected to a separate router, and only for testing, so I didn't think about that.

Windows 10 is possibly the worst spyware ever made. Quote: "Buried in the service agreement is permission to poke through everything on your PC."

Comment Image processing (Score 1) 101

When I started my PhD in image processing, I was given an 80-column, 24-line text terminal to the department microVax (approximately 1 MIP, shared between about 40 people). I was lucky, and got one of the good ones, it had an amber phospher :)

Seriously, the only place to see the results of the algorithm was on a shared display downstairs in the lab - which was in high demand. I ended up doing a lot of terminal-style graphs (mine wasn't a tektronix terminal, so I only had text-like characters) to prove an algorithm worked before actually seeing it.

And now I look at the technological ability of my freaking phone, and I wonder at just how far things have come in 30 years or so...

Comment Re:So what's the issue? (Score 3, Interesting) 206

How about someone in the bank just puts here age in like 10 years younger than she is, what's the big deal if their system thinks he is 106 instead of 116?

Well, the bank is usually allowed to issue IDs that many people who don't have a driver's license and don't want to carry their passport use. Intentionally falsifying records like that is not something I'd do without explicit approval from my boss in writing, because a note is unlikely to prevent such false documents from being issued. And that would probably escalate all the way to legal, who might have to check whatever agreements they have with the government, who will then probably say no. It's just not worth my own skin to be customer friendly.

Submission + - Intel Puma6 modems highly vulnerable to DOS attack (dslreports.com)

Idisagree writes: It's being reported by users from the dslreports forum that the Puma6 Intel cable modem variants are highly susceptible to a very low bandwidth DOS attack.

To add to this there are class actions lawsuits already going forward for performance issues with the Puma6. (https://www.classactionlawyers.com/puma6/)

It would appear the atom chip was never going to live up to the task it was designed for and these issues may have been known within Intel for quite some time.

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Real Programmers don't write in PL/I. PL/I is for programmers who can't decide whether to write in COBOL or FORTRAN.

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