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Submission + - SPAM: My Radio Discussion of the GOP's Horrendous Internet Privacy Invasion Law

Lauren Weinstein writes: Near the top of the show last night I chatted with George for a few minutes about the horribly privacy-invasive new GOP legislation that permits ISPs to sell customers’ private information (including web browsing history and much more) without prior consent. This morning I’ve been receiving requests for copies of that interview, so (with the permission of the show for posting short excerpts) it’s provided below.
Link to Original Source

Submission + - House approves bill to force public release of EPA science (ap.org)

schwit1 writes: House Republicans are taking aim at the Environmental Protection Agency, targeting the way officials use science to develop new regulations.

A bill approved Wednesday by the GOP-controlled House would require that data used to support new regulations to protect human health and the environment be released to the public.

Rep. Lamar Smith, R-Texas, said "the days of 'trust me' science are over," adding that the House bill would restore confidence in the EPA's decision-making process.

Connecticut Rep. Elizabeth Esty and other Democrats said the bill would cripple EPA's ability to conduct scientific research based on confidential medical information and risks privacy violations by exposing sensitive patient data.

The bill was approved 228-194 and now goes to the Senate.

Comment I am on Pro with deferred updates... (Score 1) 211

So, when the update comes my way in a few more months, with fewer rough edges after the microsoft personel apha tested it, the insiders beta-1 tested it and the home users beta-2 tested it, I'll be glad to be a beta-3 tester for the enterprise guys ;-)

More seriously, yes, i''l get it, but will not go out of my way to get it on April, or may, or june, or july, or...
Besides, I use a mac, this is in Bootcamp anyhow.

Comment HUGE number of vulnerabilities in Flash (Score 1) 213

There are so many vulnerabilities in Flash that it has seemed possible that Adobe is selling vulnerabilities, as the 2nd story linked below says. The only other theory is that Adobe Systems programmers have been getting no testing or other management.

Articles keep criticizing Flash, Flash, Flash. They should criticize "Adobe Systems Management".

It seems possible that Microsoft and other companies learned from Adobe Systems how much users were weak to abuse.

Stories:

Adobe Flash Player: List of security vulnerabilities. "Total number of vulnerabilities: 1,006".

Huge Adobe Flash security vulnerability revealed after hacking group's documents leaked. (July 8, 2015) "The huge weakness was revealed as part of documents leaked after a cyberattack on Hacking Team, a government-sponsored spying group, that seems to have been using it to break into computers."

Adobe Flash vulnerabilities -- a never-ending string of security risks (June 29, 2015)

Kill Flash now. Or patch these 36 vulnerabilities. "One bug being exploited right now in the wild." (June 16, 2016)

Adobe deploys security update to fix 52 vulnerabilities in Flash. (July 13, 2016) "Some of the critical flaws could lead to remote code execution on your PC."

Most Exploited Vulnerabilities: by Whom, When, and How. (Dec. 29, 2016) "The Adobe Flash Player comprised six of the top 10 vulnerabilities triggered by the exploit kits in a period from November 16, 2015, to November 15, 2016."

Submission + - The 265 members of Congress who sold you out to ISPs

Presto Vivace writes: They betrayed you for chump change

Republicans in Congress just voted to reverse a landmark FCC privacy rule that opens the door for ISPs to sell customer data. Lawmakers provided no credible reason for this being in the interest of Americans, except for vague platitudes about “consumer choice” and “free markets,” as if consumers at the mercy of their local internet monopoly are craving to have their web history quietly sold to marketers and any other 3rd party willing to pay. ... The only people who seem to want this are the people who are going to make lots of money from it. (Hint: they work for companies like Comcast, Verizon, and AT&T.) Incidentally, these people and their companies routinely give lots of money to members of Congress.

Submission + - Telecom Giants Are Pushing States to Constrain Public Rights (backchannel.com)

mirandakatz writes: There are currently plans underway in at least 17 state legislatures, as well as at the FCC, that would block cities from constraining uses of their rights-of-way by private cellular companies for 5G deployments. That means that if a city wants to set up a fair and competitive system that favors competitors, citizens, and long-range goals instead of the interests of a single big company, that would be illegal. But there's one massive catch: All of this is being done in the name of 5G—and 5G does not yet exist. At Backchannel, Susan Crawford digs into why we need to slow the onslaught of deregulatory legislation in this area and not get swept up in the still-mythical 5G hype.

Submission + - California prosecutes couple for filming officials (ap.org) 2

mi writes: California prosecutors on Tuesday charged two activists who made undercover videos of themselves interacting with officials of a taxpayer-supported organization with 15 felonies, saying they invaded privacy by filming without consent. State Attorney General Xavier Becerra, a longtime Congressional Democrat who took over the investigation in January, said in a statement that the state "will not tolerate the criminal recording of conversations."

Didn't we just determine, that filming officials is not merely a right, but a First Amendment right?

Submission + - SPAM: Google+ and the Notifications Meltdown

Lauren Weinstein writes: I’ve been getting emails recently from correspondents complaining that I have not responded to their comments/postings on Google+. I’ve just figured out why.

The new (Google unified) Google+ desktop notification panel is losing G+ notifications left and right. For a while I thought that all of the extra notifications I was seeing when I checked on mobile occasionally were dupes — but it turns out that most of them are notifications that were never presented to me on desktop, in vast numbers.

Link to Original Source

Submission + - Massachusetts Prepares to Vacate Nearly 24,000 Tainted Drug Convictions (reason.com)

schwit1 writes: Massachusetts prosecutors will move in mid-April to vacate nearly all of the roughly 24,000 drug convictions tainted by a single corrupt forensic lab chemist, The Boston Globe reported Saturday, marking the denouement of one of the largest drug lab scandals in U.S. history.

A Massachusetts prosecutor told the state's Supreme Judicial Court last week that D.A.'s would seek to keep fewer than 1,000 of the 24,000 convictions tainted by drug lab chemist Annie Dookahn, who pled guilty in 2012 to falsifying test results in favor of law enforcement and tampering with evidence over a nine-year period starting in 2003.

Submission + - Ask Slashdot: Does Slashdot Attend Conferences

omaha393 writes: Newbie question: how involved is Slashdot in on-the-ground interactions at conferences? I'm sure there's limitations financially that would make something like CES or E3 more difficult, but NASA offers free press credentials to launches and they have upcoming conferences with open invites to media outlets. Slashdot seems like it would be a great outlet for an invite. Given the site has millions of unique visitors monthly and an engaged community, what types of conferences could Slashdot feasibly attend? Factor in member participation to ask questions or raise funds and it seems like a good opportunity. I'm overlooking several other examples, but is this something Slashdot already does? Or is it too diffuse to be considered a true "media" outlet?

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