Want to read Slashdot from your mobile device? Point it at m.slashdot.org and keep reading!


Forgot your password?
Check out the new SourceForge HTML5 internet speed test! No Flash necessary and runs on all devices. ×

Submission + - The FCC just passed sweeping new rules to protect your online privacy (washingtonpost.com) 1

jriding writes: Federal regulators have approved unprecedented new rules to ensure broadband providers do not abuse their customers' app usage and browsing history, mobile location data and other sensitive personal information generated while using the Internet.

The rules, passed Thursday in a 3-to-2 vote by the Federal Communications Commission, require Internet providers, such as Comcast and Verizon, to obtain their customers' explicit consent before using or sharing that behavioral data with third parties, such as marketing firms.

Submission + - How Police Body Cameras Fail (fastcompany.com)

tedlistens writes: Since the shooting of unarmed, 18-year-old Michael Brown in 2014—an incident that was not captured on camera—activists and city governments have stridently fought for more police oversight through body-worn cameras, and cities are responding, with the help of millions of dollars in body camera grants from the White House. But the public is discovering that the technology isn't foolproof: Cameras fall off, officers fail to record, and the video itself can be kept largely out of the public record, in deference to privacy laws, police policies, and the challenges of managing massive amounts of footage. But, critics worry, when video collected for oversight purposes isn't shared publicly—or isn’t collected at all—citizens might become more suspicious about police misconduct, amplifying mistrust amid an effort to fight it. An article at Fast Company details ways in which body camera programs are falling short of their goals, and ideas for improving what some have called the most rapid technology upgrade in policing history.

Submission + - FCC Enacts Major New Online Privacy Rule

Trailrunner7 writes: The FCC has voted to enact a new rule that will force broadband companies to get consent from customers before they sell information about those customers’ online movements, history, and other actions.

The new rule will require broadband companies to have customers opt in to the sale or sharing of their online histories as part of marketing or ad deals. It includes restrictions on the way that providers can share users’ location data and other information and also ensures that they will have to tell consumers exactly what data they collect and what they do with it. The changes do not apply to how broadband providers can use customer information in their own marketing, though.

The new regulations also require that broadband providers have “common-sense” data breach notifications and reasonable security practices.

The vote by the FCC makes distinctions between broadband providers and phone carriers and other service providers. Before the vote, providers and others had urged the FCC to align its rules with existing ones from the FTC on usage of customer data for marketing.

Submission + - Tesla shocks Wall St. with huge earnings surprise and actual profits (bgr.com)

anderzole writes: Tesla on Wednesday posted its earnings report for the quarter gone by and investors will have a lot to cheer about. While analysts on Wall St. were expecting Tesla to post a loss, Tesla during its September quarter actually posted a profit, and an impressive profit at that. When the dust settled, Tesla posted a quarterly profit of $22 million and EPS of $0.71. Revenue for the quarter checked in at $2.3 billion.

Illustrating how impressive Tesla’s performance was this past quarter, Wall St. was anticipating Tesla to post a loss amid $1.9 billion in revenue for the quarter.

Submission + - Carriers to Implement Do Not Originate List to Defeat Robocalls

Trailrunner7 writes: An industry led strike force is preparing to take away one of the most valuable pieces of technology used by phone scammers: caller ID spoofing.

The Robocall Strike Force, convened by the FCC and comprising wired and wireline telecom companies, has been working since August on a handful of new technologies, standards, and other techniques to help address the robocall problem. On Wednesday, members of the strike force delivered their report to the FCC and said that a trial of a new Do Not Originate list has shown tremendous promise in preventing scammers from being able to spoof numbers belonging to government agencies, charities, and other legitimate organizations.

A trial of the DNO list that’s been running for the last few weeks on some IRS numbers has resulted in a 90 percent drop in the volume of IRS scam calls, officials from AT&T, which leads the strike force, said during the FCC meeting Wednesday. The carriers on the strike force, which include Sprint, Verizon, and many others, plan to continue testing the DNO list in the coming months, with the intent to fully implement it some time next year.

Submission + - The Future of Sustainable Farming Might Be Bugs (xconomy.com)

gthuang88 writes: The idea of insects as a protein source to feed the world isn’t new. But the U.S. agtech industry may be warming up to it. Now a Seattle startup called Beta Hatch is growing and harvesting mealworms and their waste, about 600 pounds a week, and packaging them as chicken feed and fertilizer. The goal is to be healthier and more eco-friendly than traditional feed, which uses soy. Together with companies like Tiny Farms, Exo, and Six Foods, this represents a new wave of efforts to commercialize insects for sustainable food and farming.

Submission + - SPAM: 5 Strategies to Reboot Your IT Career

snydeq writes: InfoWorld's Dan Tynan offers a look at how IT pros can step out of the server closet and into a more robust (and possibly more rewarding) tech career. 'Technology changes faster than many of us can keep up with it. ... But while the hotshot programmers and big data geeks get to play with the shiny new toys, you're busy waiting for the robots to come and take away your job. It doesn't have to be that way. Whether you cut your teeth on Unix and AIX or you tire of doing the necessary but thankless tasks that come with keeping the lights on and the datacenter humming, there's still time to reinvent yourself.'

Submission + - Easy-To-Exploit Rooting Flaw Puts Linux Computers At Risk (csoonline.com)

itwbennett writes: The maintainers of Linux distributions are rushing to patch a privilege escalation vulnerability, tracked as CVE-2016-5195, that has has existed in the Linux kernel for the past nine years and is already being exploited in the wild. The Red Hat security team describes the flaw as a 'race' condition, 'in the way the Linux kernel's memory subsystem handles the copy-on-write (COW) breakage of private read-only memory mappings.' This allows an attacker who gains access to a limited user account to obtain root privileges and therefore take complete control over the system. The vulnerability was fixed last week by the Linux kernel developers and patches for Linux distributions, including Red Hat, Debian, Ubuntu, Gentoo and Suse, have been released or are in the process of being released.

Comment VeraCrypt is sponsored by Microsoft? (Score 1, Insightful) 73

VeraCrypt is hosted on a Microsoft web site: VeraCrypt at codeplex.com.

That scares me. Consider this Network World article: Windows 10 is possibly the worst spyware ever made. Quote: "Buried in the service agreement is permission to poke through everything on your PC."

Submission + - Clinton Foundation works with Big Pharma to keep the price of US AIDS drugs high (reddit.com)

Okian Warrior writes: A newly released Podesta E-mail explains how the Clinton Health Access Initiative (CHAI) works to keep the price of AIDS medicines high in the US.

CHAI contracted with Big Pharma companies for AIDS drugs to be distributed in developing countries. In return, the group agreed to resist efforts to bring similarly lower cost and generic drugs to the US.

The email is a reaction to "comments President Clinton made on lowering domestic AIDS drugs prices at the World AIDS day event":

We have always told the drug companies that we would not pressure them and create a slippery slope where prices they negotiate with us for poor countries would inevitably lead to similar prices in rich countries.

[...] If we do try to do something in this area, we suggest that we approach the innovator companies that can currently sell products in the US with the idea of making donations to help clear the ADAP lists. For a variety of reasons, the companies will likely favor a donation approach rather than one that erodes prices across the board.

[...] I would guess that they would also likely favor a solution that involved their drugs rather than an approach that allowed generic drugs from India to flood the US market at low prices or one that set a precedent of waiving patent laws on drugs. ... We can go to war with the US drug companies if President Clinton would like to do so, but we would not suggest it.

Submission + - How are all these IoT devices on public address space to be hacked? 1

ChesterRafoon writes: Nearly all of these IoT devices mentioned in the latest internet bot attacks are consumer devices — webcams, thermostats, DVRs, things like that. Most consumer (home) network setups would host these kinds of devices on private address space behind a NAT box of some type. So how on earth where all these devices exposed to the WAN so that telnet (of all things) could attempt to connect and hijack them?

Submission + - AT&T Buys Time Warner in $86 Billion Deal (wsj.com)

dos4who writes: AT&T Inc. has reached an agreement to buy Time Warner Inc. for $86 billion, according to a person familiar with the plans, in a deal that would transform the phone company into a media giant.

Slashdot Top Deals

Thus spake the master programmer: "When a program is being tested, it is too late to make design changes." -- Geoffrey James, "The Tao of Programming"