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Submission + - ACTA and SOPA make a return via TAFTA (techdirt.com)

poetmatt writes: Techdirt notes that a new trade agreement is being released which will reintroduce the same IP maximalist issues from ACTA, SOPA and TPP previously, this time named TAFTA.

FTA: "More details are starting to come out as the main EU negotiator for ACTA, Karel de Gucht, came to DC to see about getting things kicked off, on an agreement that's being called TAFTA — the Trans Atlantic "Free Trade" Agreement. Of course, instead of recognizing the lessons from previous failed efforts to push for broken maximalist policies, it appears that the plan is to try, try again.

Submission + - Slate Mini-Biography of Aaron Swartz (slate.com)

ElDuque writes: Slate's top story today is a long, heavily-researched article about the life of, and case against, Aaron Swartz. It covers the formative years of both Mr. Swartz and the free information / open knowledge movement he felt so strongly about.

Submission + - SPAM: Every single Internet Explorer at risk ..

An anonymous reader writes: Microsoft has lined up a bumper Patch Tuesday this month to snap shut a backbreaking 57 security vulnerabilities in its products.

Five of the 12 software updates addressing the gaping holes will tackle critical flaws that allow miscreants to execute code remotely on vulnerable systems.

In all, the soon-to-be-patched vulnerabilities exist in the Windows operating system, Internet Explorer web browser, Microsoft Server Software, Microsoft Office and the .NET framework.

Link to Original Source
Google

Submission + - Judge invalidates 13 Motorola patent claims against Microsoft (techspot.com)

walterbyrd writes: "Microsoft scored a victory against Google-owned Motorola Mobility this week after a judge scrapped 13 of the latter party's patent claims in a years-long dispute over H.264-related royalties. Waged in US and German courts, the battle involves three patents (7,310,374, 7,310,375, and 7,310,376) that Motorola licenses to Microsoft for several products, including the Xbox 360, Windows and Windows Phone.

PJ is commenting on the case over at Groklaw.net"

Submission + - 550K Auction on Ebay For A Collection Dating Back 30 Years

Busshy writes: It seems the trend these days to put vast collections on ebay of Games Collections or just solitary rare games. DCEmu are reporting that a new auction with a rather staggering price of 550,000 Dollars has now appeared on the auction site. The collection which has been amassed over the last 30 years features 6850 games, 330 consoles, 220 controllers. The collector claims to have every game for Mario, Zelda, Metroid, Kirby, Castlevania, Metal Gear, Final Fantasy, Sakura Wars, Super Robot Taisen and so on. Also rare consoles such as Hitachi Gamenavi Saturn, Both the Bio Hazard Dreamcast (red & blue), The Final Fantasy Crystal Chronicles pearl white Gamecube, Game Boy Advance SP Famicom color for the 20th Mario Anniversary, The Metal Gear limited edition PSP. Still a heck of a lot of money though.
Medicine

Submission + - Crowdsourced coders take on immunology Big Data (nature.com)

ewenc writes: Mercenary computer coders are helping scientists cope with the deluge of data pouring out of research labs. A contest to write software to analyse immune-system genes garnered more than 100 entries, including many that vastly outperformed existing programs. The US$6,000 contest was launched by researchers at Harvard Medical School and Harvard Business School, both in Boston, Massachusetts. TopCoder.com, a community of more than 400,000 coders who compete in programming competitions, hosted the contest. The results are described in a letter published this week in Nature Biotechnology.
EU

Submission + - European Human Right Courts rules file-sharing human right (falkvinge.net) 2

swinferno writes: "The European Court of Human Rights has declared that the copyright monopoly stands in direct conflict with fundamental Human Rights, as defined in the European Union and elsewhere. This means that as of today, nobody sharing culture in the EU may be convicted just for breaking the copyright monopoly law; the bar for convicting was raised considerably. This can be expected to have far-reaching implications, not just judicially, but in confirming that the copyright monopoly stands at odds with human rights."
Businesses

Submission + - Email Trails Show Bankers Behaving Badly

An anonymous reader writes: The New York Times is running a pair of stories about US financial institutions being investigated by the Federal government and courts for alleged systemic and illegal activities that helped bring about the housing crisis and collapse of the world economy in 2008. Emails produced during courtroom discovery reveal that insiders at JP Morgan Chase knew that the bundles of securities they were marketing to investors were rotten with bad loans. And emails show the credit rating agency Standard & Poor's (a division of McGraw-Hill) was determined to stop losing deals to its competitors by being too tough on the banks whose products they were evaluating

Submission + - European Court of Human Rights finds against copyright law (falkvinge.net) 1

admiral snackbar writes: The European Court of Human Rights has declared that the copyright monopoly stands in direct conflict with fundamental Human Rights, as defined in the European Union and elsewhere. This means that as of today, nobody sharing culture in the EU may be convicted just for breaking the copyright monopoly law; the bar for convicting was raised considerably.

Submission + - Radical new Space drive (wired.co.uk) 2

Noctis-Kaban writes: Scientists in China have built and tested a radical new space drive. Although the thrust it produces may not be enough to lift your mobile phone, it looks like it could radically change the satellite industry. Satellites are just the start: with superconducting components, this technology could generate the thrust to drive everything from deep space probes to flying cars. And it all started with a British engineer whose invention was ignored and ridiculed in his home country.
The Military

Submission + - Handheld Black Hornet Nano drones issued to U.K. soldiers (gizmag.com)

cylonlover writes: Drones have become a valuable asset for any military force in recent years for both combat and surveillance. But while scanning a warzone from miles away is great from a tactical standpoint, unmanned aircraft can be just as useful in the hands of troops on the ground. That's why British soldiers in Afghanistan have been issued several Black Hornet Nanos, a palm-sized UAV that can scout around corners and obstacles for hidden dangers. Each UAV measures just 4 x 1 inches (10 x 2.5cm) and weighs a mere 0.6 ounces (16 grams), making it easy for troops to carry along with the rest of their gear. A built-in camera transmits live video and still images to a handheld control unit at a range of up to half a mile (800 meters).
Power

Submission + - Solar Impulse Completes First Solar Intercontinental Flight (solarimpulse.com)

An anonymous reader writes: Slashdotters may remember the Solar Impulse — the world's first 100% solar-powered airplane — from last year when it made its public debut. Today the Solar Impulse made news again as it successfully completed the world's first solar-powered intercontinental flight — a pivotal step that paves the way for the plane's first trip around the world in 2014.
Space

Submission + - Watch the Venus Transit from start to finish (tech-stew.com) 1

techfun89 writes: "The Venus Transit of 2012 has now finished, but thanks to the Solar Observatory, we can view the event in its entirety from a different perspective.

This transit of Venus was rare. The next transit won't occur until Dec 11, 2117, so mark your calendars. The data obtained from this transit will assist scientists in both discovering some unknown secrets of Venus as well as techniques for searching for planets around other stars."

Networking

Submission + - Fluke Getting Back into Handheld Tester Market (enterprisenetworkingplanet.com)

slashbill writes: Fluke is getting back into the handheld Ethernet/network testing market. Why they left it 7 years ago is a wonder to me since folks were duct-tapping their old testers together just to keep them working. At least they learned something but at $5K to $10K a pop will anyone buy a new one?
Power

Submission + - Zeolite thermal storage retains heat indefinitely, absorbs four times more heat (extremetech.com) 2

MrSeb writes: "Hold onto your hat/life partner/gonads: Scientists in Germany have created small, zeolite pellets that can store up to four times more heat than water, loss-free for “lengthy periods of time.” In theory, you can store heat in these pellets, and then extract exactly the same amount of heat after an indeterminate amount of time. Zeolites (literally “boil stones”) aren’t exactly new: The term was coined in 1756 by Axel Cronstedt, a Swedish mineralogist who noted that some minerals, upon being heated, release large amounts of steam from water that had been previously adsorbed. For the last 250 years, scientists have tried to shoehorn this process in a heat storage system — and now, the Fraunhofer Institute, working with industrial partners, has worked out how to do it."

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