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Comment Re:a little late to the party (Score 1) 98

Well, thank you for admitting you were wrong at least, I guess.

Shame you've still decided to bask in wilful ignorance though by refusing to listen to a word anyone else with actual experience of multiple products is telling you, and still amazed you think lock-in is even possible in a product that supports standard SQL and doesn't force you into any extensions (which just about all SQL RDBMS have btw) but hey, you don't know much so I shouldn't be too surprised that you're again mouthing off about something you have no clue about in the name of an unfounded anti-MS rant though I guess.

Comment Swap?? (Score 2) 41

Holy fuck.

Someone is in Hawaii and they elect to stay inside playing games???

I tell you what...you come here and stay in my suburban home in the states with a high speed connection that will allow you to pwn everyone in the game, and I'll stay in your home in Hawaii, surf, scuba, hike, and lay out on the beach.

Comment Re:No one makes anyone buy anything. (Score 1) 162

Do you actually think that at some point prices were based on maintaining a "moral" 10% profit margin?

This is a product of snowflake think.

Sadly, we've raised a sheltered generation of kids that thing the world is fair, everyone is equal, business and all manner of human interaction is moral, and above all else, protect everyones self esteem.

Yes, for some reason, people are now attaching the word 'moral' to fiscal transactions...job salaries, welfare.....etc. Hell, I've had them talking about morality in taxation...really?

Money has never been about morals. It is there to earn the person/company a profit, to pay its employees and owners. Nothing more.

Taxes are there to fund the govt. services to the populace...nothing morality based at all.

But, you are running more and more into "Snowflake Think" of this type.

Hmm...I may have just coined a phrase here....

Comment Re:a little late to the party (Score 1) 98

But there we are again - changing the terms of the discussion, your problem with it now is merely that you're complaining it isn't open source (hint: it's in preview still), and that it has incomplete Linux support.

Yet here is your original post where you apparently didn't make a sweeping comment and where you claim you merely asked a question:

"You've been able to use Python for a while in Postgres [postgresql.org], MySQL [mysqltutorial.org], SQLite [python.org], and even DB2 [ibm.com].

I can't quite figure out why anybody would want to use Microsoft SQL Server."

Want to retract that now? It's pretty clear you're backpedalling - I don't care if you want to ignore me, just don't pretend you're here to learn when you're clearly not interested in that, and just end up backpedalling when you get called out. People like me are more than happy to share our experience with such products, but don't waste our time if you're not willing to listen and are actually just busy being a zealot whilst pretending otherwise.

Comment Re:a little late to the party (Score 1) 98

"So you actually know nothing about MS SQL Server yourself, you just like it because... what?"

This is precisely the point I'm making - you say you want to learn, but you're not listening. I pointed out that I've worked with many other RDBMS in the past. Oracle is unnecessarily convoluted and proprietary just for the sake of trying to sell specialist training, though it is powerful and performant. MySQL is a joke - the very fact it even has (or had) to be bundled with a tool to fix broken datafiles is in itself farcicle, and as I said, in a production environment I saw it collapse for exactly this reason roughly every 3 - 6 months. I've never used DB2, but I've also never heard of anywhere using it in recent years either and frankly even their 3 case studies on their product site are companies I've never heard of. Maybe it's great, who knows, but it's just not a prominent option anymore, and with reduced prominent comes reduced training availability, reduced available skill sets on the market, reduced peer support when things go wrong.

So again, I like MS SQL server because it's stable unlike MySQL, it's easy to use, diagnose, maintain, and debug unlike Oracle, it offers centralised security configuration, as I've explained already, it integrates excellently not just with .NET but is widely and well supported in just about every language's DB framework out there.

On performance it can easily hold it's own against Oracle and PostgreSQL, I'll admit I have seen faster throughput on MySQL, but let's be clear, that's because MySQL cuts corners, and hence why it suffers from data integrity issues. If I wanted to sacrifice any of the ACID principles then I'd use a data storage system that intentionally does that and is designed for that from the outset, rather than because of failure of implementation - e.g. I'd look at a NoSQL solution if that fit my needs.

We use it for massive, massive databases, probably one of the highest use case scenarios you'll see without getting into Google index or Facebook use scale applications and here it does well too, it scales well, and it's easy to scale. We use it in a scenario where we're bound by contract in terms of response times, where any loss of reliability for even a short period can have literally millions of pounds of impact. Microsoft's support has been great - even on their existing closed source version they listen and make product changes based on our feedback, and that of other customers.

Others here have made the point that there's plenty of reasons to hate Microsoft, but SQL server isn't one of them, and that's absolutely true. Microsoft do a lot wrong, but products like Visual Studio, languages like C#, and products like SQL server are prime examples of things they absolutely do right.

I would suggest, rather than assuming you know it all and making sweeping comments about products you do not understand that you turn your thinking around and instead consider that something might be okay until you have reason to think otherwise. Because once again, by jumping to the conclusion that something is bad just because Microsoft, then hating people and childishly making them your foe because they explained why you're wrong, you're making a fool of yourself.

I could jump to conclusion too, I could assume that because you have a relatively high UID that you're probably relatively young and utterly naive, thinking you know better than those of us who have some extensive experience in the industry. I'm not going to do that though because I might be wrong - I'm going to give you the benefit of the doubt that you're just stressed, and venting your anger here or some such by trolling regardless of your circumstances, but ultimately it doesn't change the fact that you're wrong, and would do well to listen to all those explaining why if you ever want to get anywhere in this industry. A successful career has no room for zealotry and willful ignorance, you simply evaluate the options and take the best one for your use case, as many companies have found, hence the sales figures, that's quite often MS SQL server.

Comment Re:It has its uses (Score 1) 381

I'm going to argue there are no special cases that don't fit.

In a strictly mathematical sense, yes, various things are equivalent and various patterns are universal. However, that's a bit like saying you can do anything with sequencing, selection and repetition. While true in a sense, realistically it doesn't necessarily represent the clearest way to express everything. In practice, I have sometimes found that while I might build individual parts of a complicated algorithm from tools like folds, it may be clearer and easier to write the "big picture" using explicit recursion rather than trying to adapt everything to fit some standard algorithm.

As a practical example, not so long ago I was working on some code that would take some information in a certain format as input, and update a rather complicated graph-like data structure to incorporate that extra information. This algorithm involved walking the graph, and depending on the properties of each node reached and of the information to be merged in, either updating that single node "in place" or changing the structure of the graph around it. Each such step would typically transfer some of the remaining information into the graph, and then continue walking the rest of the graph to merge in the rest of the information until one or the other ran out. No doubt with enough mathematical machinations this could have been shoe-horned into some standard pattern, but in practice it was far simpler and more transparent to write a small set of mutually recursive functions that implemented the required behaviour at each step. And of course each of those functions then received information about the state of the graph walk and the state of the information being merged in through parameters.

At this point I think purity allows for laziness and laziness demonstrates a lot of the advantages of purity.

If you only care about the result of evaluating a function, sure, but if you also care about the performance characteristics of your program, I don't think it's so simple. Laziness can be both a blessing and a curse.

As for lazy with large amounts of data, Hadoop is lazy. So I'm not sure what you are saying.

In short, unrestricted laziness can cause huge increases in the amount of working memory required to run a program, until finally something triggers the postponed evaluations and restores order. As I recall, there was even a simple tutorial example in Real World Haskell that could wind up exhausting the available memory just by scanning a moderately large directory tree because of the accumulated lazy thunks.

Comment Re: Ontario, largest subnational debtor on the pla (Score -1) 404

Wealth is an abstract concept. In nature noone owns anything

- you own your body if you can protect it. You own your territory if you can protect it. There is no difference between nature and us, we are nature.

If you don't own anything then why would you mind if I decided to kill you for food (don't worry, I am a vegetarian, but I may sell your body to others for food). So you see, your property starts with possession of your own body and mind and from there it extends to the work that you do in your life because that work takes your personal time, the time of your life.

Your work is time taken out of your life that you are spending not on pleasure but on work (maybe your work is pleasure for you but that doesn't really change anything). To take what you have worked for and to distribute it to others, who did not do this work is the injustice of oppression imposed by the collectivism that we are observing here and the more of that is happening the more people will fight against it in every possible way.

I am all for people outsourcing, automating, avoiding and evading every tax they can because that is the fight against the oppression and violence of the collectivist mob and it needs to be done.

Comment Re:Vigorous debate? Surely you jest (Score -1) 404

I've been on this site since around 1998, registered the account within a couple of years I think. As an anarcho capitalist/objectivist I don't see what it is you are seeing (this site becoming more libertarian minded, which means less Statist, less collectivist). For whatever reason the population here is quite happy to be part of a 'larger than self' collective and it's quite happy to use collectivism for protectionism, for taxation and redistribution and such. Where have you seen this shift towards 'Randian garbage' as you call it? Individuals are mostly drowned out in the overall collectivist noise here.

Comment Re:minwage $11.40-$9.90 (Score 0) 404

Supply side economics has clearly failed.

- no, American economy (and Canadian and many other Western economies) are failing to produce because they have failed the entire concept of economics, which is production. You cannot demand anything if you don't produce, these experiments will further drive poverty up in communities where they take place by ensuring further erosion of the value of the money they are using and by pushing businesses away, further increasing the perceived need for government intervention, which will intervene further by taking more from those who produce and redistributing to those who cannot.

This will end in a failure of the economic system and dismantling of the political structure, pushing entire nations into abject poverty (see Venezuela, North Korea, USSR, Cuba, etc.)

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