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The Internet The Media

BBC to Provide Extensive RSS 176

Georgie2032 writes "The BBC News Online's Editor states that beginning in the middle of May, the BBC will be 'completely liberating the availability of its content' using its Really Simple Syndication (RSS) tool. 'So in May we'll be happy for outside websites to dip in and take our headlines'"
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BBC to Provide Extensive RSS

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  • by katana ( 122232 ) on Saturday April 30, 2005 @01:39AM (#12390828) Homepage
    If they do this for press releases, Slashdot won't even need editors anymore!
    • Hehe, you my friend, made the same mistake I did. Sure the RSS is already there, but right now, it's only for personal use. Starting May, they plan to let other websites take a dip of their news.
  • I don't get it (Score:2, Interesting)

    by dangitman ( 862676 )
    "The BBC News Online's Editor states that beginning in the middle of May, the BBC will be 'completely liberating the availability of its content' using its Really Simple Syndication (RSS) tool. 'So in May we'll be happy for outside websites to dip in and take our headlines'"

    I don't really understand what RSS has to do with this. Why would adding an additional protocol, suddenly make them more amenable to others "dipping" into their headlines? After all, the HTML technology of the web allows others to use t

    • Re:I don't get it (Score:4, Insightful)

      by cranos ( 592602 ) on Saturday April 30, 2005 @02:16AM (#12390904) Homepage Journal
      Its a hell of a lot easier to parse and put into your news system if its in XML than HTML. HTML makes it look pretty, XML/RSS makes it look machine readable.
    • If you run an Intranet like I do then RSS makes it simple to provide the users with a summary of news headlines or relevant information on a single page without the users having to visit each individual site - our Intranet's news page pools headlines on specific topics from 5 sites into one summary - very handy and it saves you having to visit multiple sites.

      Incidentally, the BBC has had RSS feeds for at least a year so why this is new news I do not know.
  • I wonder... (Score:2, Interesting)

    by ral315 ( 741081 )
    Why would they wait until AFTER the U.K. elections? It seems like it would be more advantageous to open it up now, before the elections.
    • Re:I wonder... (Score:1, Informative)

      by Anonymous Coward
      "Why would they wait until AFTER the U.K. elections?"

      Because of precisely that. The election part of the BBC's site takes up a considerable amount of resources - ditto Wimbledon and other national events. RSS is the next project in the list and rolling it out mid-election is stretching a little too much.
  • the BBC (Score:5, Informative)

    by sg310l ( 880185 ) on Saturday April 30, 2005 @01:50AM (#12390856)
    The BBC is a public information service and doesnt rely on advert to get money but every english perosn paying for the privilage of having a TV or radio, this may be an alien concept to many americans but this is why the BBC can give other sites access to their RSS feed, because they dont cling to users visiting their site to keep their heads above water and resorting to obnoxious flash adverts and popups
    • Re:the BBC (Score:2, Informative)

      by aaron.rowe ( 40518 )
      "Every english perosn paying for the privalage of having a TV or radio,"

      Points of correction. Welsh and Scottish people also pay a TV license in the UK. I'm pretty sure they do in Northern Ireland too.

      It's also only one license per household not each person watching TV. I think Pensioners get a free license now and you don't need one to listen to radio.

      It does pay for the BBC and it's a hell of a lot cheaper than cable. Theres more to watch too.
      • It does pay for the BBC and it's a hell of a lot cheaper than cable. Theres more to watch too.

        And it's a helluvalot better quality programming. One of the few good things about living in this island really...

    • Re:the BBC (Score:5, Insightful)

      by mugstar ( 765102 ) on Saturday April 30, 2005 @05:07AM (#12391337)
      British. The word you're looking for is British, not English.
  • ...welcome our new... no... who cares. Too bloody apathetic at this hour... No, can't even manage a Python reference either.

    Still faster to listen to fellow techs from Britain online and a lot more colourful too. This can go in the "Yes, but can they make it into efficient text for my cell browser?" Department.

    :q
  • by bergeron76 ( 176351 ) * on Saturday April 30, 2005 @01:56AM (#12390865)
    I'll stick with my "Fair and Balanced" Fox News broadcasts/websites. Afterall, those evil Europeans are nothing but future terrorists and Christ killers!

    Who do they think they are syndicating content without permission from US Copyright courts? [sic]

    • for a site that lives and dies by "competition is great" you'd think two voices would be welcomed in politics. I watch Fox and BBC, both are full of crap but I'm not so far gone I think Bush is a Nazi, or A Hero. The truth is in the middle somewhere and if you only listen to one side of the argument.. ah hell with it, i bet most of you are the guy that laughs at commercials and repeats things said in advertisements.
    • With blatently bies news outlets spining to the left hard when Fox trys to give "fair and ballenced" they end up bodyslamming into the right.

      There is no reasonable guide for what is "fair". The extreams (both left and right) have been bashing away at the means of determining if something has gone off ballence.

      At best Fox provides a diffrent spin from the rest of the news media.

      I've watched the BBC news feeds and while there is spin it's not that bad.

      Between BBC, CNN and Fox you'll have enough peaces to
    • "Fair and Balanced" from a news prospective or public interest ?
  • That nebulous polling 'technology' that almost nobody outside of the 'blogosphere' cares much about...
  • I think somebody just found their towel...
  • by Nice2Cats ( 557310 ) on Saturday April 30, 2005 @03:05AM (#12391045)
    The BBC has some of the best shows around, especially when it comes to natural history, science, and whatnot -- probably the best in th world in fact. And the range of stuff they offer online is unbelievable. Every Thursday, they post their In Our Time [bbc.co.uk] program(me) online as a MP3 file. Listen to them all, if you can.

    However, all is not well with the news content. The BBC is famous for switching to "propaganda mode" whenever British interests are involved, as good as they are with things that are far away. Also, there are been repeated charges of a systematic anti-Israeli bias [honestreporting.com] in their coverage.

    They do great work, but for all the gushing, do remember they have their share of problems.

    • balance problem ? (Score:4, Insightful)

      by Sad Loser ( 625938 ) * on Saturday April 30, 2005 @03:40AM (#12391121)

      Ummm.

      Maybe I'm missing something, but the 'honestreporting.com' site does seem to have a single aim of increasing the amount of PR favouring Jewish interests.

      If you are after balance, it strikes me as odd that you would refer /. readers to a site which explicitly unilateral.

      I am not a particular fan of the BBC, and its 'youth' shows are shockingly bad, especially radio 1, which is for tards. But its news is pretty good, in an up-itself British sort of way.
      • especially radio 1, which is for tards

        The Essential Mix is an awesome show. I've got mixes from some of the world's best DJs they did for TEM on Radio 1 and they're phenomenal.

        "If the bass is too deep, you are to weak.
        If the music is too loud, you are too old!"
    • by Anonymous Coward
      Yes, but one can say the same about American media being too pro-Israeli. Notice when you watch American TV, there is little coverage of actions taken by the Israeli army in the occupied territories.

      Example from your link:

      "This is a highly sensitive issue," the narrator says, but "the majority of neo-conservatives have been and remain Jewish...are strongly pro-Zionist and want to topple regimes in the Middle East to help Israel..." Says bbcwatch, "It is hard to find clear blue water between these theorie
    • I think thats probably due to the israeli's killing their reporters and carmera men. Its kind of a hard thing to get over experically when its all caught on film. Maybe another reason for it is there is a general anti-Israeli sentiment in british society. Note this is not the same an anti-semitism but related to the israeli-Palestinian conflict, which many find abhorrent.

      Considering the amount of disagreements the BBC has had with the goverment of the day durin its time maybe it should be called an Anti-Propaganda Mode. :)

      The BBC while not perfect is generally held to alot higher standard then other broadcasters, and I think that is something to be proud of.
    • by Anonymous Coward
      It is interesting to note that the website that is given to highlight the anti-israeli bias ( http://www.honestreporting.com/ [honestreporting.com]) in the BBCs coverage is affiliated to http://www.israelpetition.com/ [israelpetition.com], which has the following quote at the top of their webpage

      "For Zion's sake I will not be silent,
      and for Jerusalem's sake I will not rest."
      Isaiah 62:1

      While individual programmes broadcasted by the BBC may contain some bias, I think it is fair to assume that honestreporting.com has an even larger bias, given its aff
    • Meanwhile, there are also persistent claims of systematic pro-Israeli bias.

      http://electronicintifada.net/v2/article2402.shtml [electronicintifada.net]

      Seems to me, they've got the balance pretty right.
    • There's no anti-Israeli bias in the British media, or indeed the British population in general.

      The reason that these allegations are made is because the Israeli government is used to the overwhelming pro-Israeli bias in the US media. When foreign (not just British) media displays any kind of balance (by, say, criticising a decision made by the Israeli government) then cries of 'Anti-Semite' go up.
  • by bullitB ( 447519 ) on Saturday April 30, 2005 @03:10AM (#12391052)
    "Extensive Really Simple Syndication?" So it's both extensive (Large in extent, range, or amount) and simple (composed of only one element). Hmm.

    Kinda like the MPEG-4 "Advanced Simple Profile," maybe.
  • Great job !! we appreciate it.
  • by DjReagan ( 143826 ) on Saturday April 30, 2005 @04:07AM (#12391188)
    Hrm. According to the article, BBC's current RSS feeds are for personal use. However, slashdot has been republishing the BBC Tech News in a slashbox for quite some time.

    Further investigation shows this page [bbc.co.uk] which indicates that UK Based sites can also make free use of the syndicated feeds. It seems other sites need to license them.

  • The typical BBC pattern is get everyone hooked on the Sopranos, Twin Peaks, [insert your favorite series here], then once everyone is *really* into it, replace the time slot with Snooker. Happines every single time. Of course they promise to bring the series back 'in the future'... but anyone with a life can't keep up with their whims. And for what? Snooker?! How come Sopranos .torrents are busy(?); ever seen a snooker .torrent? It must be a winning formula though. They are consistent. I love RSS, but can'
  • With the Beeb GIVING IT AWAY ... are all the hardworking media whores going to starve?
  • now is the time to make it easier to use with Firefox. Instead of that lame error about xml stylesheets, do the obvious thing and offer a bookmark.

    Do you really have to do all that editing of live bookmarks etc to add an RSS feed (on the 99% of sites which don't give you the little icon in the bottom right corner of the screen automatically)?

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