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Technology

DURL, a Search Tool for del.icio.us 174

Roland Piquepaille writes "I've been a strong advocate of the social bookmarking service named del.icio.us since it started (check here for an example). And almost every single day, a new tool appears and enhances the use of this service. This new one, DURL, written by Robin Millette, lets you type an URL and see if some other people already "delicious'ed it." And this is very efficient because it leads you to people who not only bookmarked the URL, but also assigned to it some pertinent keywords or tags, giving you new and fresh ideas. Services like Bloglines or Technorati among others certainly can return hundreds of links, so they are good for 'popularity contests.' But for building social communities and introducing you to sources you wouldn't have thought of, they don't compare to del.icio.us. This overview contains more comments, examples and screenshots."
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DURL, a Search Tool for del.icio.us

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  • by Anonymous Coward on Monday December 27, 2004 @01:22PM (#11192313)

    Roland Piquepaille and Slashdot: Is there a connection?

    I think most of you are aware of the controversy surrounding regular Slashdot article submitter Roland Piquepaille. For those of you who don't know, please allow me to bring forth all the facts. Roland Piquepaille has an online journal (I refuse to use the word "blog") located at www.primidi.com [primidi.com]. It is titled "Roland Piquepaille's Technology Trends". It consists almost entirely of content, both text and pictures, taken from reputable news websites and online technical journals. He does give credit to the other websites, but it wasn't always so. Only after many complaints were raised by the Slashdot readership did he start giving credit where credit was due. However, this is not what the controversy is about.

    Roland Piquepaille's Technology Trends serves online advertisements through a service called Blogads, located at www.blogads.com. Blogads is not your traditional online advertiser; rather than base payments on click-throughs, Blogads pays a flat fee based on the level of traffic your online journal generates. This way Blogads can guarantee that an advertisement on a particular online journal will reach a particular number of users. So advertisements on high traffic online journals are appropriately more expensive to buy, but the advertisement is guaranteed to be seen by a large amount of people. This, in turn, encourages people like Roland Piquepaille to try their best to increase traffic to their journals in order to increase the going rates for advertisements on their web pages. But advertisers do have some flexibility. Blogads serves two classes of advertisements. The premium ad space that is seen at the top of the web page by all viewers is reserved for "Special Advertisers"; it holds only one advertisement. The secondary ad space is located near the bottom half of the page, so that the user must scroll down the window to see it. This space can contain up to four advertisements and is reserved for regular advertisers, or just "Advertisers". Visit Roland Piquepaille's Technology Trends (www.primidi.com [primidi.com]) to see it for yourself.

    Before we talk about money, let's talk about the service that Roland Piquepaille provides in his journal. He goes out and looks for interesting articles about new and emerging technologies. He provides a very brief overview of the articles, then copies a few choice paragraphs and the occasional picture from each article and puts them up on his web page. Finally, he adds a minimal amount of original content between the copied-and-pasted text in an effort to make the journal entry coherent and appear to add value to the original articles. Nothing more, nothing less.

    Now let's talk about money. Visit http://www.blogads.com/order_html?adstrip_category =tech&politics= [blogads.com] to check the following facts for yourself. As of today, December XX 2004, the going rate for the premium advertisement space on Roland Piquepaille's Technology Trends is $375 for one month. One of the four standard advertisements costs $150 for one month. So, the maximum advertising space brings in $375 x 1 + $150 x 4 = $975 for one month. Obviously not all $975 will go directly to Roland Piquepaille, as Blogads gets a portion of that as a service fee, but he will receive the majority of it. According to the FAQ [blogads.com], Blogads takes 20%. So Roland Piquepaille gets 80% of $975, a maximum of $780 each month. www.primidi.com is hosted by clara.net (look it up at http://www.networksolutions.com/en_US/whois/index. jhtml [networksolutions.com] [networksolutions.com]). Browsing clara.net's hosting solutions, the most expensive hosting service is their Clarahost Advanced (http://www.uk.clara.net/clarahost/advanced.php [clara.net]) priced at £69.99 GBP. This is roughly, at the time of this writing, $130 USD. Assuming Roland Piquepaille pays for the Clarahost Advanced hosting service, he is out $130 leaving him with a maximum net profit of $650 each mont
    • Roland Piquepaille has an online journal (I refuse to use the word "blog") located at www.primidi.com [primidi.com]. It is titled "Roland Piquepaille's Technology Trends". It consists almost entirely of content, both text and pictures, taken from reputable news websites and online technical journals.

      Sweet I will have to go check out this website, thanks for the link! Oh wait maybe I should read the rest of your post first....

      • If my article is marked as offtopic and the parent is marked as a troll, does that mean my response is actually insightful???
        • Bah. Idiot mods. They usually have no sense of humor, no insight, and well... no sense at all. However, I will say this. I've noticed that if someone says something that may annoy one of the Slashdork crew, you tend to get a ton of "Offtopic" or "Overrated" mods. I wish I could meet one of the mods in person just once. Just once... ;P
    • by Anonymous Coward
      This leaves Roland Piquepaille with $647 each month


      The Slashdot readership that can see through Roland Piquepaille's farce objects on the basis that he stands to make a generous amount of money


      Wow, a whole $647 per month! What would I possibly do with that much money. I can't even dream that big!
      • Hey, it might not be much for you, mister multi-millionaire, but for the rest of us, some extra cash will always come in handy, especially during the Christmas season.

        And i do think the guy deserves some credit for finding a way to make some money off the Internet.
    • Newsflash: that's how all newspaper sites make their money! They mostly copy the content from original sites, add in a few pieces of opinion, and make money on subscriptions, but usually just advertisement. Hell, that's what Slashdot does, too! How do you think Slashdot makes money? And it is my belief that they make tens of thousands. But that's not the point: the point is that Slashdot does it, Roland does it, everyone else does it: that's how it is. Stop bitching.

      • Newspapers actually pay for services like the AP [ap.org] or UPI [upi.com] or Reuters [reuters.com].

        Roland makes money by copy and pasting articles and then writing a few sentences about them. I have nothing against his blog. I do have something against him profiting from it.
        • Not all, not all the time: they even cite the sources, and comparing them to the articles, they are very much similar. And what about Slashdot? It wantonly encourages such behaviour. Hell, Roland's site is essentially a Slashdot. Don't think I care about him OR his site, but I think you're being very unfair and elitist.

          • I am just asking for bad karma here
            I can completely see where you are coming from. Yes, slashdot does something similar. But 99% of the articles that slashdot links to are original content, where the originator PROFITS (through advertisements) from the link from slashdot (or in some cases loses tons of money from the extra bandwidth, but that is bit beyond the matter at hand).

            If Roland wants to provide the information that he provided, he could have submitted what he wrote on his website instead of a s
            • The originator also profits from Roland's site, as the visitor will click on the source to view the content. I see no difference.

              • The only difference, would be Roland profiting for doing absolutely nothing. He could have just as easily put the article text on slashdot.

                I hate to use the phrase "site whore", but that is essentially what he is doing. I feel the same way when anyone else uses the same dishonest tactic. There is no need for a middleman in the process when slashdot is already providing this service.
      • by Scratch-O-Matic ( 245992 ) on Monday December 27, 2004 @04:37PM (#11193973)
        the point is that Slashdot does it, Roland does it, everyone else does it: that's how it is.

        All of this is news to me, but it seems to me that the real point is the apparent 100% acceptance rate of these articles. If there is some sort of arrangement between Slashdot and Roland, basic ethics would dictate that the connection be disclosed to readers -- like on TV News when they say "XYZ Company, which is owned by the parent company of this network, announced today..."

        There is nothing wrong with posting links to articles others have written in order to generate traffic and make money, which, as you point out, both Slashdot and Roland do. But publishing a news service and selecting your news based on a financial arrangement is a little shady.
    • by Anonymous Coward
      Funny...upon visiting primidi.com [primidi.com] I don't see any advertisements as you claim. Yes, it could be a very recent change, but before you post a flame book maybe you should verify your claim. Looks to me like he's using geeklog as his syndication engine btw.
    • It's called "editing." It's a profession. I'm completely ignorant of Roland other than what you say here, but I find nothing objectionable about the practice (so long as he cites the source material and does not plaigerize).

      But I've heard people talk about the rise of "freelance editors" (cherry-pick the best stories from multiple sources, add context, etc.) for a while. Maybe he's the first?
    • Slashdot Request (Score:4, Insightful)

      by gclef ( 96311 ) on Monday December 27, 2004 @03:27PM (#11193318)
      Editors/Slashdot managers,
      in the interest of keeping the discussion on Roland's stories civil, I'd like to make a Slashdot enhancement request: Could you please create a category for Roland's stories, which interested users could remove from the front page (like many people did with the Jon Katz years ago)?

      If people could remove his stories, many of the whining about his stories would vanish, since they'd have a way to avoid him.
    • You do know that same if not most news papers print out news that are usually written by news agencies like STT, Reuters, Itar-Tass and such..

      And many "news" websites do this too. I used to be admin in the one of the biggest portals in Finland and we had straight feed from STT, they would send article material with ftp into our servers and data would get automatically appended into the article database and show to the users..

      Atleast this guy goes to the net and gathers the interesting things by himself to
    • How do you know Slashdot accepts every Piquepaille submission? His Slashdot "homepage" lists only those accepted, not those rejected (or pending); unprivileged Slashdot users can't see the rejections. Unless it's you, CowboyNeal ! Posting as AC in a deliriously crafty unredisinformation campaign to dispel any criticism of your fat Piquepaille/Slashdot nexus, which might threaten your $129.40:mo (20% of Piquepaille's $647) kickback! With over 800K registered users (and counteless other ACs), that's at least
  • Nnooooo... (Score:2, Insightful)

    by Anonymous Coward
    Not another Roland article spamming his stupid site for advertising dollars!
  • Doh (Score:5, Funny)

    by nizo ( 81281 ) * on Monday December 27, 2004 @01:23PM (#11192320) Homepage Journal
    I've been a strong advocate of the social bookmarking service named del.icio.us....

    Nothing says "thanks for providing a great service" like a good post-holiday slashdotting. Note: the burning smell coming from the server room isn't fudge cooking.

    Oh and I noticed they have a "most active" list of links, but no porn section???

  • This sounds a little bit like the firefox extension Wikalong [phunnel.org]. With this extension installed you can make comments about a particular website and read what other people have written. Its kind of like meta data for web pages.

  • by antifoidulus ( 807088 ) on Monday December 27, 2004 @01:27PM (#11192363) Homepage Journal
    I thought it was a way for me to quickly compare all the mortgage offers I get in my email....
  • by pridkett ( 2666 ) <slashdot@wagstro[ ]et ['m.n' in gap]> on Monday December 27, 2004 @01:30PM (#11192380) Homepage Journal
    The delicious firefox plugin from http://delicious.mozdev.org/ [mozdev.org] is a little better than this because you can right click on a page and see who else has bookmarked without going to the page. It also gives tons of other nice feature, such as caching of you del.icio.us bookmarks for a sidebar. It's really nice.
    • It amazes me to see such simple stuff celebrated and drawing so much attention. I find the DURL output quite hard to read. On the other hand, Simpy[1] is a service like Delicious (but with a superior full-text search, full Boolean support and so on) and it offers something very much like DURL. However, unlike DURL, it also shows you the popularity of a given link over time, as a chart![2]. This makes is _much_ easier to visualize things.
      If you don't have a Simpy account, you can try the demo account[3].
      • It amazes me to see such simple stuff celebrated and drawing so much attention.

        Not me. The main reason del.icio.us has gotten so much attention, IMO, is the simplicity. It's a tool, it does one or two things and does them well. Oh, yeah, plus you can bring in bookmarks into any app via RSS.

        As to your site... I fail to see why I would want a chart of a links popularity. But that's just me... maybe there are lots of folks who do.

        BTW, you should tweak your stylesheet a bit more. The stock plone css is
      • Good idea, I'm planning on implementing the same thing in the next little while... see Durl Update [waglo.com]. Also note that del.icio.us will soon be provinding the RSS feed itself, so I have to think of more stuff for Durl ;)
    • If you're interested in the delicious extension, I've made a hacked version [severinghaus.org] that allows you to select multiple tags (for a tag intersection) and select multiple bookmarks (to open the whole selected items in tabs). It's not an official version, though I have submitted bugs and patches for them. Something similar will hopefully be incorporated soon.
  • Smut (Score:5, Funny)

    by superstick58 ( 809423 ) on Monday December 27, 2004 @01:34PM (#11192409)
    I am shocked by the amazing lack of smut on this page. Not that I would want more myself. I am more curious on how this content stays off the lists. Maybe the site has not reached that crowd yet?

    Were has all the pr0n gone?

  • by blair1q ( 305137 ) on Monday December 27, 2004 @01:35PM (#11192414) Journal

    sla.shdo.tted
  • by smug_lisp_weenie ( 824771 ) <cbarski.4503440@bloglines.com> on Monday December 27, 2004 @01:36PM (#11192423) Homepage
    So you sign up at del.icio.us (a rather akward domain name) and you make yourself a user name. After you've signed up, you get a special web link you can put on the bookmark toolbar of your browser.

    Then later, whenever you then find a page on the 'net you like and want to "bookmark", instead of using your browser to bookmark it, you click on your link to delicious and a window pops up where you can type in a few "tags" that you think describe the page you're visiting.

    What makes delicious so cool is that you don't need to make a complex hierarchy to organize your links: Instead, the program lets you slice 'em and dice 'em based on the tags: Just go to "del.icio.us/userid" and you can browse all your bookmarks.

    Like Wikis, delicious is so powerful because it is so incredibly simple: For instance, typing "del.icio.us/tag/waffles" gives you a list of all sites everyone on delicious has bookmarked about waffles. This simplicity also makes it easy for others to create extensions for firefox (foxylicious) and such.

    Also cool is that if you find other people who create good bookmarks you can set up to be notified when they post new stuff.

    From my expereince, delicious is by far the fastest website dispersing mechanism that exists: Before the big blogs have the latest coolest links, delicious users will already know about it way beforehand, because of the excellent way it can be used to track niche interests on the web.
    • 1) So what am I going to do with the three thousand plus bookmarks I've collected over the years? There seems to be no import mechanism

      2) If there is a way to import existing bookmarks, this has interesting security implications. A quick search through my Firefox bookmarks yielded two URLs with username/password included as CGI vars. No website does that for anything important (I hope), these are some forum and mailing list sites, for which I use a low-value password, but people who use the same password f
      • I use it because I often find things while at work that would be useful to know about in the future. I can find a link that I thought was interesting a month ago when I'm at home, or at a friend's house, or whatever.

        I don't know about importing, or the security, but come on. Don't use a high-level password for this kind of thing.
    • Now, only to find a way to name it without the stupid dots. I tolerate (at best) the capitalization of the second letter of a name, like iPod and nVidia, I hate most products with the letter X in it, or extreme, Xtreme, ultra, etcetera, but this is altogether retarded on a new level.
    • What makes delicious so cool is that you don't need to make a complex hierarchy to organize your links: Instead, the program lets you slice 'em and dice 'em based on the tags: Just go to "del.icio.us/userid" and you can browse all your bookmarks.

      Anyone tried Spurl [spurl.net] or Furl [furl.net]? They seem very similar to del.icio.us. Any recommendations about which one to use?
  • by mahesh_gharat ( 633793 ) on Monday December 27, 2004 @01:50PM (#11192535)
    I searched for http://slashdot.org on http://tools.waglo.com/durl
    The result showed hundreds of entries for slashdot with different descriptions.
    At the bottom the last entry description was like this: Community weblog - for coders and geeks. Has interesting reputation management system - "Karma". Despite crap in discussions very frequently points to interesting links.

    I don't know why we have such image in other people's minds.

    On the site 2004weblogawards.com, though slashdot was discussed for the weblog awards, we didn't made it.
    Check the following URL and see what they are talking about: http://2004weblogawards.com/archives/000071.php
    Check for the following comment: I would recommend Slashdot if they weren't so UNIX slanted, and full of idiots.

    I think we (at SlashDot) should enhance our image infront of the world.
  • by Anonymous Coward on Monday December 27, 2004 @01:57PM (#11192580)
    DURL, a Search Tool for del.icio.us

    I've been a strong advocate of the social bookmarking service named del.icio.us [del.icio.us] since it started (check here [primidi.com] for an example). And almost every single day, a new tool appears and enhances the use of this service. This new one, DURL [waglo.com], written by Robin Millette [waglo.com], lets you type an URL and see if some other people already "delicious'ed it." And this is very efficient because it leads you to people who not only bookmarked the URL, but also assigned to it some pertinent keywords or tags, giving you new and fresh ideas. Services like Bloglines or Technorati among others certainly can return hundreds of links, so they are good for 'popularity contests.' But for building social communities and introducing you to sources you wouldn't have thought of, they don't compare to del.icio.us. Read more for lots of examples...

    As I'm not sure if I convinced you, let's start with a real blog, Smart Mobs [smartmobs.com].

    If I feed the URL http://www.smartmobs.com/ [smartmobs.com] to Bloglines [bloglines.com] by submitting the search string "http://www.bloglines.com/citations?url=http://www .smartmobs.com/&submit=Search," I receive 3358 unsorted results.

    If I do the same with Technorati [technorati.com], I find 1,614 links from 1,234 sources, sorted by date.

    In both cases, this produces a number of references which is hard to browse. Why a particular site has quoted Smart Mobs? It's not obvious to find an answer.

    So, it's time to use DURL, which returns a more manageable number of 45 results from del.icio.us.

    http://www.primidi.com/images/durl_1.jpg

    Here is a screen capture of the page returned by DURL. You can see that some people are reading Smart Mobs because they associated it with the concepts of "creativity" or "ubiquitous computing". Others are using tags such as "collaboration," "mobile" or "community." (Credit: Robin Millette/del.icio.us).

    Let's check for example the tag "Social Software."

    http://www.primidi.com/images/durl_2.jpg

    It brings us to del.icio.us/hbryant/social_software [del.icio.us]. (Credit: del.icio.us). Wow! Exciting! New tools for del.icio.us! Let's visit Soooo del.icio.us people can't stand it! [weblogsinc.com].

    In a summary, with only two clicks, I found a gold mine. Do you know another service which is that efficient?

    Now, let's return to the previous page and check the link to the "community" tag.

    http://www.primidi.com/images/durl_3.jpg

    This time, this leads us to del.icio.us/oubiwann/community [del.icio.us]. (Credit: del.icio.us). From there, I can now read a "definition of Mundialization" or discover what is the "World Government of World Citizens."

    The more I use del.icio.us, the more I like it. This doesn't mean I'm not using Bloglines or Technorati, but I'm using them for 'exhaustivity,' not for 'discovery.'

    [And here is an additional note for Robin Millette, the author of DURL. In fact, you can do the same search on del.icio.us by adding the string "http://del.icio.us/url?url=" (without the quotes) before the URL you want to see if it has been delicioused. But it might be too geeky for some of you.]

    Source: Robin Millette, December 20, 2004; and various websites

    • Here is a screen capture of the page returned by DURL. You can see that some people are reading Smart Mobs because they associated it with the concepts of "creativity" or "ubiquitous computing". Others are using tags such as "collaboration," "mobile" or "community." (Credit: Robin Millette/del.icio.us).

      I run a small internet community called MemeStreams [memestreams.net] that has had a feature like this for some time. MemeStreams has a thread bookmarklet. [memestreams.net] You can click on it when viewing any URL and see a discussion thread

  • My other multimillion dollar idea is:
    ascendtopresident

    Everyone is rated on their forum postings on news articles like hot or not.
    Everyone can click their own personal bias: such as rep/dem, con/lib, prolife/prochoice. And the highest ranking of them will ascend to the top, so you can read the top people's comments on news articles. Being on the top will encourage people to spend more time on their responses too.
  • spurl (Score:2, Informative)

    by camcorder ( 759720 )
    As an alternative to deli.cio.us spurl [slashdot.org] is a good service for online bookmarking.

    Actually I found spurl's interface best of its kind, and it has really nice browser workarounds to get you ready to spurl easy and fast. Even a spurl firefox extension [mozdev.org] is out. Spurl has a plugin for IE as well.
  • I like delicious so I made my own version that is multi-lingual here:
    http://historyagent.com/
    Has firefox extensions, and HTML segment (images/formatting etc) commenting via selection. You just select a portion of the page, including images, to use as the comment and hit the bookmarklet and it is added.

    Also I wanted more feeds possible, for examples see: http://feeds.historyagent.com/joeldg/

    Anyway, just wanted to point out that del is no the only alternative out there.
  • DURL is redunadant (Score:3, Informative)

    by EqualSlash ( 690076 ) on Monday December 27, 2004 @02:23PM (#11192812)
    I wonder why the slashdot editors allowed this one to be published in the first place. I am sure any geek on slashdot worth his salt can just easily use this for the same thing:
    http://del.icio.us/url?url=http://www.myurl.com/
    it would be trivial to create a javascript bookmarklet to do just that.
    • Almost... when I wrote it, I didn't know about that trick. I figured the parameter was an md5 string, and gave instructions on how to use that. But soon, I wrote a small script to turn the result of a URL search into an RSS feed, something del.icio.us itself doesn't yet provide. I never thought it would make slashdot though - not really prepared for that at all!
    • or you could drag this bit of javascript to your toolbar:
      <a href="javascript:location.href='http://del.icio.us /url?url=' + location.href;">Del.icio.us History</a>
      (came from here [secretlair.com])
  • Searching for http://www.primidi.com gave 21 results, with only a couple of comments. I thought every slashdotter who used del.icio.us would have commented on this site by now.
  • by Anonymous Coward on Monday December 27, 2004 @02:48PM (#11193019)
    So, this [slashdot.org] gets a +5 and then drops like a stone to a two - OK, it's a repeat, but still bears examination. Then Roland, the troll, replies himself [slashdot.org].

    Now, there are a lot [slashdot.org] of [slashdot.org] insightful [slashdot.org] replies [slashdot.org] - all of which dropped like a stone from 3/4/5 insightful to 0/1 insightful in the space of two minutes.

    In my mind this leaves two options:

    1. Lots of people love Roland, but they are shy, and only moderate and don't post
    2. Roland is sleeping with Hemos

    Y'know, I used to respect the anarchy of Slashdot. Now, I don't think there's any way we can trust the objectivity of the editors a bit.

    Or am I really the only one here who think's Roland is a plagiarizing c*nt?

    cLive ;-)

  • by MasTRE ( 588396 )
    I'm looking for a stand-alone alternative. del.icio.us is great, but when the site goes down (as it did when this was posted), you are f-d. What's a good alternative that will do something akin to it? Something that requires a database/server install is fine (and actually preferred, as it's accessible over the net) - the main requirement is that there be some way to back up my data and, in case the server crashes/burns, I can set up a new serv[er|ice] and simply reload my backup. Which I can't do with d
    • Totally agree.
      One step towards that would be implementing import/ export options of popular bookmark file formats.
      But wait, here's another idea -- wouldn't it be great if we could keyword search our bookmarked pages? They should run Gatherers on the bookmark files (Anyone remember the "Harvest" system?).
      So, if anyone has some process cycles to spare, and an online Linux server, email me -- I'd be willing to try and set up indexers that build separate indexes for each bookmark file. exsched@r-emove.yahoo
  • I haven't used del.icio.us myself - can anyone tell me if it's prone to being spammed or not? If not, what do they do to prevent it from being overrun by link whores and the like? (it's sad that we even have to think about that, but the brutal reality seems to be if anything can be ruined in the name of a making money, it will be)
  • Simpy[1] is a service like Delicious (but with a superior full-text search). It offers something very much like DURL, but it also shows you the popularity of a given link over time, as a chart![2]. If you don't have a Simpy account, you can try the demo account[3].

    [1] Simpy [simpy.com]
    [2] Link History bookmarklet [simpy.com]
    [3] demo/demo [simpy.com]
  • I do not understand why the tool should get a big fuss, it is already available with foxy.licio.us and the coding of this tool does not need much brains or skill(It is in del.icio.us's API). The author also does not give us any source code so it is obviously not GPL. Anyways I have coded two scripts that do exactly what this tool does using the del.icio.us API, and it only required about 7 minutes of research on the web. Here they are they do not do rss fead but you could make it do it just search of an rss
  • So I just made myself an account, added GMAIL as a bookmark, and then decided to see which other users did the same. In fact, there were 331 others, all identified by their Deli's usernames, and practically all of them linking to gmail's login page. Ditto for the 126 with links to My Yahoo!. Etc' Etc'.

    Best to have a Deli' account that is different from the one used for email services... I can easily see Spam mail originating from these sorts of lookups.
  • Doesn't del.icio.us do what furl does, but without saving content? Does anyone know both these services?
  • A similar service called Hyperlinkomatic [hyperlinkomatic.com] is available. I have been using it for a while and although it hasn't been updated since the summer, it has been very useful for me, and whenever my friends are bored, I can send them to my personal page [hyperlinkomatic.com] chocked full of url goodness.
  • Similar...and there's a RSS feed.

    Furl.net [furl.net]

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