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Comment: Re:This is clearly futile... (Score 4, Insightful) 92

by Tom (#48474171) Attached to: Google Told To Expand Right To Be Forgotten

What's going through the EU's mind right now?

Can't tell (not telepathic), but I'm in support of this right and I can tell you what I think: The Internet is full of half-truths and outright lies. Search engines do not deliver results based on the truth value of sites, but on popularity, page ranking and such. If, 10 years ago, you were arrested for child porn, with headlines in the newspapers. Three months later, charges were dropped, everyone apologized profoundly to you for the mistake, the government paid a ton of money for your troubles and the prosecutor who go your arrested lost his job.

Which part of this, do you think, will show up on Google, today?

We can do nothing about people remembering things wrong. But we can do something about search engines creating false impressions.

Maybe in the future, semantic web and intelligent agents will be able to show you the relevant context information and solve the problem. But until then, people's lives are being ruined and that problem needs a solution before they're dead, wouldn't you agree?

Comment: Re:RFID/card scanner (Score 1) 123

by postbigbang (#48471875) Attached to: Ask Slashdot: Best Biometric Authentication System?

I'd agree with this. There comes a point where people will avoid 2Fa if it's too complex. Sometimes it just means adding nagware, timeouts, and WTFs if auth isn't congruent. And sometimes weird legal dept senses of regulatory compliance enter in, too. Indeed that might be the best place to start if audit/compliance is a side-output of the process.

Comment: Re:RFID/card scanner (Score 1) 123

by postbigbang (#48471205) Attached to: Ask Slashdot: Best Biometric Authentication System?

Use a YubiKey and OAuth APIs. Neat and clean, and although it can be spoofed, it's not easy to do, and is as good as you get without easy to screw up "bio-authentication" infrastructure. You keep it on your badge fob, and it squirts a string as a single-key USB keyboard. Grab the string, use it with OAuth or as an identifier, and be on your way with sanity.

Comment: Re:Money how? (Score 1) 116

by MightyMartian (#48470551) Attached to: BlackBerry Will Buy Your iPhone For $550

If Microsoft, with orders of a magnitude more cash available to burn is finding it almost impossible to break the Android-iOS duopoly, I'm thinking BB's chances of making a comeback sufficient to create a third player in the market are somewhat on the same order of a extrasolar comet flying into the solar system, slingshoting around Jupiter, hooking off Neptune, doing four orbits of the sun before being captured for three orbits by Saturn, being flung at Earth, breaking up under the Moon's gravitational pull and a one inch piece flying to earth severing John Chen's left testicle as he takes a leak.

Comment: Re:Bah hah hah (Score 1) 116

by MightyMartian (#48470469) Attached to: BlackBerry Will Buy Your iPhone For $550

???

Our staff's Android and iOS devices all hook into Exchange and can use its address book, all via SSL connections. Maybe BB is a bit more feature rich, but having to run BES as an integrator between BB devices and an Exchange server is a resource-hungry pain in the ass. ActiveSync does the job well enough.

Comment: Re:Not enough (Score 3, Insightful) 116

by MightyMartian (#48470445) Attached to: BlackBerry Will Buy Your iPhone For $550

They're thinking "Hmmm, do we hand this mountain of cash we're still sitting on back to the shareholders and close up shop, or do we spend that cash frivolously on doomed loss leaders schemes and executive salaries?"

I think you can probably guess at the answer. But really, anyone still holding BB stock at this point is staking more of a religious position than a business one. Anyone with any interest in meaningfully profitable investment strategies dumped BB a long time ago.

The next stage, I'm presuming, is for BlackBerry to turn into SCO and start trying to extort license fees from Android manufacturers and Apple.

Comment: Re:Money how? (Score 3, Insightful) 116

by MightyMartian (#48470425) Attached to: BlackBerry Will Buy Your iPhone For $550

They have virtually no sales, but a huge amount of cash from their halcyon days. Rather than simply hand that money back to investors and close shop, they've decided that a "flush it all down the toilet" strategy is in order.

I get that they're trying to do the loss leader game, but if this is successful, BB will be out of pocket a heap load of cash with little immediate benefit. If it isn't successful, then the stunt demonstrates they're fate is to be a bit player with a niche in keyboard smartphones, and no hopes of ever taking on Android and iOS devices.

Comment: Re:Can Iowa handle a circus that large? (Score 3, Insightful) 398

by MightyMartian (#48467503) Attached to: Former HP CEO Carly Fiorina Considering US Presidential Run

Toxic to whom? Bill Clinton left office in 2000 with astonishingly good approval ratings, despite Gingrich's and Co's endless attempts to destroy him.

Now Hillary Clinton is no Bill Clinton, but I don't think the Clinton name in general is nearly as toxic as, say, the Bush name (although, in Jeb's defense, I don't think he's the mumbling bumbling alcohol-fried moron his brother is).

Comment: Re: Storage (Score 1) 490

by peragrin (#48466671) Attached to: Ask Slashdot: Why Is the Power Grid So Crummy In So Many Places?

We called the electric company once as a branch had fallen on the line and was being held up. It was a y shaped branch that had broken from the tree above and balanced perfectly on the line. We got fined for calling in a problem that didn't exist. The inspector knocked the branch off the line and then said it was the wind. We had a witness to that so the fine disappeared.

In NY power companies are only required to trim trees once every 20 years. Most of the trees that grow reach full height in 10 years.

Comment: Re:Aerial or underground ? (Score 3, Insightful) 490

by peragrin (#48465821) Attached to: Ask Slashdot: Why Is the Power Grid So Crummy In So Many Places?

You do realize most aerials are aluminum right?

Not only that but in free air both basically double their current handling loads. So you get situations were a 200amp rated line is being tied into a 200amp line that is half the size coming from the power company.

Once The power companies are allowed to massively over rate the cables compared to what building codes allow. think how much money they save by using cables half the size.

A language that doesn't have everything is actually easier to program in than some that do. -- Dennis M. Ritchie

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