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Comment: Re: Wow, this *IS* old... (Score 1) 171

by rickb928 (#49467719) Attached to: Windows Remains Vulnerable To Serious 18-Year-Old SMB Security Flaw

I shouldn't have left the impression that this instructor taught us to block but default. At that time MCSE didn't teach that. And he didn't either. We all discussed it over coffee among other things, like the stupidity of naming your intranet 'msft.net'. That was taught at one time.

Comment: Wow, this *IS* old... (Score 5, Insightful) 171

by rickb928 (#49465779) Attached to: Windows Remains Vulnerable To Serious 18-Year-Old SMB Security Flaw

IIRC, we discussed this in MSE classes, the same ones where the instructor assured us we need not register a domain name for our internal network (!), and agreed that despite the lack of information from Microsoft, It was worth it to block SMB ports from the public networks. As well as others, such as SQL Server (1433/1434 at a minimum), AD (135,389,5722, and the list goes on), and other services we need not expose to nor listen on for external traffic, we rapidly got to the point where the reasonably responsible admin blocked by default, opened only what was necessary, and then directed these to the proper hosts inside the network.

This is slightly older than the Y2K bug. And still not really fixed? Microsoft's choices here have always come back to haunt them. NetDDE, OLE, the HTML viewers, and this, all making Outlook once the premier distribution method for viruses and all form of malware,

Interprocess friendliness has its cost. Ease of use goes both ways. The crooks are happy to take advantage of your features.

Comment: Re: How about cutting sugar* (Score 1) 68

by rickb928 (#49463267) Attached to: Plaque-busting Nanoparticles Could Help Fight Tooth Decay

"There's a reason why a pound of pasta costs $0.99 while chicken goes for $1.99 a pound"

This isn't just an apples v oranges argument. Pasta chicken. One is a plentiful source of carbs, the other a plentiful source of protein.

What was your comparison intended to illustrate? If you meant to point out that protein is expensive, yup, but compare chicken and soybeans, or rice, and then we can have a more useful comparison.

Comment: Re: How about cutting sugar* (Score 1) 68

by rickb928 (#49463221) Attached to: Plaque-busting Nanoparticles Could Help Fight Tooth Decay

"Have you ever actually owned a dog or a cat? Every one I've ever had eventually developed problems with their teeth as they aged, usually ending with the tooth in question needing to be pulled."

And what did you feed them? I fed my cats commercial foods, and they are really, really not very good for them, dental issues being only one of several.

Comment: HTTPS is a pox, necessary or not (Score 2) 89

by rickb928 (#49420083) Attached to: The Problem With Using End-to-End Web Crypto as a Cure-All

Forcing HTTPS on every website is the current scammage. For this, I get to go out and buy a cert, mess with the server, and all for a Joomla site that doesn't have any internal security issues fixed by HTTPS.

What is this fixing, again? Wordpress add in vulnerabilities, or certificate authorities revenue?

Get hold of portable property. -- Charles Dickens, "Great Expectations"

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