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Comment: Re:A Sympton of the Problem (Score 2, Insightful) 300

by rickb928 (#49524245) Attached to: Futures Trader Arrested For Causing 2010 'Flash Crash'

That's stupid. You only need to delay settlement by seconds, force the buyer to hold for 6 minutes, and the HFT system is broken.

Or you could levy a truly minimal transaction tax, even processing fee for orders executed in than 250ms from offer to buy to re-offer... Maybe.

But thinking you should force holding stock for days means you need to suspend trading when any news breaks. Which halts the market.

Just slow HFT by milliseconds.

Oh, and audit brokers. If they persist in offering stock they actually don't have, perhaps that's a problem? This whole episode sounds like NASDAQ, except they seem to have the stock.

Comment: Re:Here's a better idea (Score 1) 669

by rickb928 (#49515185) Attached to: William Shatner Proposes $30 Billion Water Pipeline To California

Santa Barbara has a plant in standby mode - 2 years to reactivate, and they have begun planning for that. Planning.

San Diego will be getting water form the Carlsbad plant late this year. It took only about 15 years to build this, mostly to overcome objections from everyone.

These plants take time to permit and build, and planning is the most important step. But in California, that is in short supply, like the water.

Comment: Re:Here's a better idea (Score 1) 669

by rickb928 (#49515143) Attached to: William Shatner Proposes $30 Billion Water Pipeline To California

Who cares if Nestle is reselling water ant any price? Their usage is a tiny fraction of the total, and shutting down ALL bottled water production in California would change nothing about the drought and impact.

Agriculture is the big user, and then people who live where water isn't. As with many resource shortages, this is equally a problem of delivery and planning. There is water to be had for Californians, but it takes planning, and there are few excuses for not doing that already. Only now do they start looking at desalination.

Looking to take it from Arizona is sort of cheap. Not going to happen.

Comment: We fought this fight over typewriters (Score 1) 649

by rickb928 (#49514883) Attached to: Automakers To Gearheads: Stop Repairing Cars

When IBM said you could not service their typewriters, fought to gain access to manuals and parts.

We're gonna have to have this fight over cars. I service my cars regularly,repairing items from brakes to heater cores. When I finally buy one younger than 2006 I will have to confront the electronics, the locked-down systems, and the self-diagnostics that will not tell me anything beyond 'take me to a dealer'. then I will be disappointed.

I can understand the desire manufacturers have to lock their ECU code and such, but it's past that, and something as simple as sticky window could result in a code thrown, needing to use the dealer tool to reset the computer that supervised that, and being a bit lighter in the pocket than you expected.

Having driven a Saab 900NG, the Tech II tool was allegedly needed for everything from a disconnected battery to a sticky convertible top. I got past every one of those issues, but back then Saab and GM had not yet envisioned the opportunity for exploitation. The 900NG merely had electronics where mechanisms had been. They missed the boat. Not that Saab ever made things easy to fix - my mechanic reminding me the only right way to do most engine service was to drop the subframe... Thanks buddy...

Comment: Re: Wow, this *IS* old... (Score 1) 171

by rickb928 (#49467719) Attached to: Windows Remains Vulnerable To Serious 18-Year-Old SMB Security Flaw

I shouldn't have left the impression that this instructor taught us to block but default. At that time MCSE didn't teach that. And he didn't either. We all discussed it over coffee among other things, like the stupidity of naming your intranet 'msft.net'. That was taught at one time.

Comment: Wow, this *IS* old... (Score 5, Insightful) 171

by rickb928 (#49465779) Attached to: Windows Remains Vulnerable To Serious 18-Year-Old SMB Security Flaw

IIRC, we discussed this in MSE classes, the same ones where the instructor assured us we need not register a domain name for our internal network (!), and agreed that despite the lack of information from Microsoft, It was worth it to block SMB ports from the public networks. As well as others, such as SQL Server (1433/1434 at a minimum), AD (135,389,5722, and the list goes on), and other services we need not expose to nor listen on for external traffic, we rapidly got to the point where the reasonably responsible admin blocked by default, opened only what was necessary, and then directed these to the proper hosts inside the network.

This is slightly older than the Y2K bug. And still not really fixed? Microsoft's choices here have always come back to haunt them. NetDDE, OLE, the HTML viewers, and this, all making Outlook once the premier distribution method for viruses and all form of malware,

Interprocess friendliness has its cost. Ease of use goes both ways. The crooks are happy to take advantage of your features.

Comment: Re: How about cutting sugar* (Score 1) 68

by rickb928 (#49463267) Attached to: Plaque-busting Nanoparticles Could Help Fight Tooth Decay

"There's a reason why a pound of pasta costs $0.99 while chicken goes for $1.99 a pound"

This isn't just an apples v oranges argument. Pasta chicken. One is a plentiful source of carbs, the other a plentiful source of protein.

What was your comparison intended to illustrate? If you meant to point out that protein is expensive, yup, but compare chicken and soybeans, or rice, and then we can have a more useful comparison.

Comment: Re: How about cutting sugar* (Score 1) 68

by rickb928 (#49463221) Attached to: Plaque-busting Nanoparticles Could Help Fight Tooth Decay

"Have you ever actually owned a dog or a cat? Every one I've ever had eventually developed problems with their teeth as they aged, usually ending with the tooth in question needing to be pulled."

And what did you feed them? I fed my cats commercial foods, and they are really, really not very good for them, dental issues being only one of several.

e-credibility: the non-guaranteeable likelihood that the electronic data you're seeing is genuine rather than somebody's made-up crap. - Karl Lehenbauer

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