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Comment: Re: Suck it Millenials (Score 1, Insightful) 396

by rickb928 (#49353279) Attached to: Millennial Tech Workers Losing Ground In US

Why do you think I'm pissed?

I've paid the taxes that paid for Social Security for the Greatest Generation.

My taxes went towards the failures of the War on Poverty, to cleaning up our environment, to three economic bubbles and the collapses, towards wars, and the education of the most ungrateful generations ever.

I may or may not receive Social Security and Medicare, but I don't expect to retire anyways.

I didn't grow up on computers and technology. I spotted them, adopted them, and made a living from them, from the very beginning of the personal computer revolution. While you were figuring them out, I was making then work. I still am.

I found Linux while working with its successors, and made a living off of it also.

But I'm not angry. Unless you count in the current political climate, them I'm angry, but that's a very different topic.

Comment: Oh really? (Score 1) 1089

by rickb928 (#49303945) Attached to: Obama: Maybe It's Time For Mandatory Voting In US

"they're skewed more heavily towards immigrant groups and minority groups. There's a reason why some folks try to keep them away from the polls."

And there's a reason you, Mr., President, want them to be forced to go to the polls. Same reason. You believe it gives you and your allies an advantage.

Of course, that presumes there is a concerted effort to keep these groups away from the polls to start with, and I dispute that, but we can disagree on that and still find fault with the initial proposal, that voting be mandatory.

Oh, and getting the money (or even the influence of money) out of politics by making voting mandatory? That was a sly joke, right?

Comment: Re:It supports it just fine, article is BS (Score 1) 166

by rickb928 (#49303813) Attached to: Internet of Things Endangered By Inaccurate Network Time, Says NIST

And this works fine even if the time differences are 'positive' or 'negative'?

It's when LocalTime appears in the future that the fun begins. Snap LocalTime back a few seconds to sync with CurrentbaseTime, feh, probably livable. But make it more than an hour, and do you risk having all of those log entries either being reset to some arbitrary time, or do they have to disappear? And my password change? And the front door alarm entry? Did that get re-timed, or deleted, or marked as suspicious?

We are going to use the concept of synthetic time to resolve these issues.

I know this is nontrivial. So will the IoT deal with this sufficiently? Do many systems deal with this well?

Comment: Re:Free market will sort it out (Score 0) 254

by rickb928 (#49284619) Attached to: Evolution Market's Admins Are Gone, Along With $12M In Bitcoin

If 'the government' (pick one as you wish) wasn't fighting the murder-for-hire market, they could expand into a viable market and openly sell both the service and the risk.

It's inane to blame prohibition for this in any way, unless your point is that unsavory individuals tend to flock to unsavory markets, and the results when they do unto others before they are done unto would somehow be mitigated if 'the government' wasn't so darned restrictive.

This could easily happen to a site trafficking in aluminum billet shift knobs.

Comment: It's real, and it will be fixed... (Score 1) 269

by rickb928 (#49276623) Attached to: Fraud Rampant In Apple Pay

This is Big Deal at work. We saw nothing like this with Softcard or Google Wallet, and most of the causes are related to sloppy onboarding. Right now we are writing off almost all losses, but that's only until we resolve the major problems.

This is not just the onboarding however, and we will see changes in how these charges are authed.

Growing pains. I'm not excessively worried yet.

Comment: Re: Panda, taking the "anti-" out of "anti-malware (Score 1) 99

by rickb928 (#49252223) Attached to: Panda Antivirus Flags Itself As Malware

I'm beginning to like Agile. I don't have to wait 2 months to find out my next release is being delayed another 2 months. In Agile I get disappointed every two weeks.

This is not sarcasm. My users now get told their fix will be in weeks, not months, and no finding out 2 months later that's another 2 months. Yes, they still wait 2 months, but it feels better. To them.

Comment: Re:The Rules (Score 1) 347

by rickb928 (#49244101) Attached to: FCC Posts Its 400-Page Net Neutrality Order

0. Netflix will charge the end ISP (Comcast, for instance) with throttling or pay-to-play.Lawsuit.

1. ISP (Comcast for instance) will claim this is the fault of the lousy Netflix connection (through Cogent, for instance), and maybe even sue the connection provider.

2. Netflix's provider (Congent, for instance) will disclaim any responsibility, maybe even sue Comcast (for instance), you know, slander.

3. After a few years, customers will buy the higher tiers of service from Comcast (for instance).

4. Before that, customers will buy the higher tier of service from Netflix, the one that has such better speed and performance, the one that is connected directly to their ISP (Comcast, for instance).

5. Profit!

And little has changed.

1 Sagan = Billions & Billions

Working...