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OS I'd Most Like To See Make a Comeback

Displaying poll results.
UNIVAC
  1455 votes / 4%
DOS
  4350 votes / 13%
BeOS
  10254 votes / 32%
AmigaOS
  6190 votes / 19%
TRS-80 DOS
  1103 votes / 3%
Windows ME
  3709 votes / 11%
Other
  4457 votes / 14%
31518 total votes.
[ Voting Booth | Other Polls | Back Home ]
  • Don't complain about lack of options. You've got to pick a few when you do multiple choice. Those are the breaks.
  • Feel free to suggest poll ideas if you're feeling creative. I'd strongly suggest reading the past polls first.
  • This whole thing is wildly inaccurate. Rounding errors, ballot stuffers, dynamic IPs, firewalls. If you're using these numbers to do anything important, you're insane.
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OS I'd Most Like To See Make a Comeback

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  • OS/2 (Score:4, Insightful)

    by DarthVain (724186) on Wednesday December 15, 2010 @04:53PM (#34565820)

    Muhahaha!

  • Re:OS/2 (Score:5, Insightful)

    by operagost (62405) on Wednesday December 15, 2010 @04:57PM (#34565878) Homepage Journal
    Most of what made OS/2 great, Microsoft has finally mastered.
  • Multics (Score:2, Insightful)

    by Anonymous Coward on Wednesday December 15, 2010 @04:59PM (#34565914)

    http://www.multicians.org/

  • by feidaykin (158035) on Wednesday December 15, 2010 @05:45PM (#34566680) Journal
    But, BeOS does live on in Haiku. [haiku-os.org]

    I really loved BeOS back in the 90s. It was a solid, stable and insanely fast OS. Sadly I guess those things don't matter much when you've got nothing to run on it.
  • by MichaelSmith (789609) on Wednesday December 15, 2010 @07:09PM (#34567880) Homepage Journal

    *looks around* Hmm... I wonder if I've wandered to someone's lawn...

    I feel sorry for youngsters. Computing in what my son calls "the olden days" was huge fun. Though not as productive as it is today.

  • Re:Classic Mac OS (Score:4, Insightful)

    by Jethro (14165) on Wednesday December 15, 2010 @07:35PM (#34568142) Homepage

    That's kinda funny, I wouldn't have touched a Mac with a 10' pole if it wasn't for OS X. Then again I used to really like NeXTSTEP and I'm a UNIX guy, so I'm actually loving OS X. Linux is my choice for desktops (and servers and media center PCs), but my last few laptops were all Macs. My next one will be a Mac, too.

  • Re:MS-DOS 3.3 (Score:4, Insightful)

    by arth1 (260657) on Wednesday December 15, 2010 @07:39PM (#34568194) Homepage Journal

    Reliable, simple, did everything I needed it to do.

    Unfortunately, MS-DOS 3.3 was OEM only.

    6.22 was the latest and greatest retail version.

  • by camperdave (969942) on Wednesday December 15, 2010 @07:44PM (#34568272) Journal
    Computing in what my son calls "the olden days" was huge fun. Though not as productive as it is today.

    For certain values of "productive". Back in the old days you could write a graphing program with a couple of for loops and a plot command. Now there's all sorts of hoops you have to jump through to simply open up a window.
  • Re:Newton OS (Score:4, Insightful)

    by bcmm (768152) on Wednesday December 15, 2010 @08:02PM (#34568448)
    The Newton was a proper computer that you could install your own programs on. That isn't allowed on the iPad, and so neither is Newton emulation.
  • Re:Classic Mac OS (Score:5, Insightful)

    by Pfhorrest (545131) on Thursday December 16, 2010 @01:04AM (#34570530) Homepage Journal

    He said Classic Mac OS was a steaming pile under the hood (but not, implicitly, "over the hood"), while OSX was the opposite (great on the inside, but a steaming pile on the outside). I feel less strongly, but similarly.

    With Classic Mac OS, it felt like working through the GUI was working directly with what the OS was doing; not like the GUI was a user-friendly "shell" around the "real" OS, hiding overly complex things from the user for their own good. In Classic Mac OS, working with the GUI was as direct a way to work with the computer as working with the CLI is on unices.

    Now, in OSX, the GUI seems like a pretty, simple shell hacked on top of the "real" OS, the true interface of which is a complicated, difficult-to-learn CLI. Every app might have a different GUI, even many of Apple's apps have different appearances, and the "same" button has different behaviors in different apps (I'm looking at you, Zoom button). Consistency has gone out the window.

    Compounding that, many apps now try to do file management within themselves, rather than leaving the file manager (the Finder) for that, adding to the "what app is my file in" confusion that so many uneducated users seem to have (apps are tools that you apply to files, not locations where you store them!). Yes, iTunes and iPhoto and the like have some very nice ways of browsing and organizing files -- but that functionality should be in the Finder instead (like how Cover Flow finally made its way from iTunes to the Finder, where it should have been to begin with). Even worse is when the organization that the app is doing is not directly reflected in the file system, leaving you dependent on that particular application to manage your files: merging two iPhoto libraries is not so simple as copying the contents of one into another, for example.

    These are the kinds of things that Apple used to be exemplary about, and now they're little better than Windows. Still a little better, granted, enough that I still prefer the Mac over Windows easily, but I do feel like something has been lost since the days of Classic Mac OS. Much has been gained as well of course, but what was lost was not necessary to sacrifice for those gains. You could have both.

  • Re:Old Code (Score:5, Insightful)

    by Weedhopper (168515) on Thursday December 16, 2010 @04:51PM (#34579500)

    There were certain aspects of BeOS that were amazing, but there were also certain aspects of BeOS that were crude and downright primitive.

The universe is all a spin-off of the Big Bang.

 



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