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Comment GE Invented offshoring (Score 3, Informative) 36

Seems kind of poetic justice that GE needs to reinvent itself to write software after Jack Welch kickstarted offshoring software development to India

Indian executives say early investments by GE in India gave their technology and business service sectors crucial credibility and cash when other companies still viewed the country as a risky backwater. Moreover, exposure to Mr. Welch's culture of cost-cutting and efficiency taught them business skills they are now using to compete globally, often against U.S. firms.

Comment Re:Not sure it's worth living that long (Score 0) 135

19th century which make modern corruption pale in comparison...The time we live in today is a lite version of what life was like 130 years earlier

So that makes it okay?

I will say Obama is not a socialist compared to the real communists like Karl Marx and Lennin

I don't know why you would call Lenin (not Lennin) a communist or a socialist, he was a totalitarian dictator.

Submission + - G.E., the 124-Year-Old Software Start-Up (nytimes.com)

mspohr writes: The NY Times has an interesting article about GE "reinventing" itself as a software start-up.
"It may not qualify as a lightning-bolt eureka moment, but Jeffrey R. Immelt, chief executive of General Electric, recalls the June day in 2009 that got him thinking. He was speaking with G.E. scientists about new jet engines they were building, laden with sensors to generate a trove of data from every flight — but to what end?

That data could someday be as valuable as the machinery itself, if not more so. But G.E. couldn’t make use of it.

“We had to be more capable in software,” Mr. Immelt said he decided. Maybe G.E. — a maker of power turbines, jet engines, locomotives and medical-imaging equipment — needed to think of its competitors as Amazon and IBM."
They have a software center with 1,400 employees in San Ramon, Ca and are developing a new OS, Predix, designed to work with sensor data from machines.
"G.E.’s success or failure over the next decade, Mr. Immelt says, depends on this transformation. He calls it “probably the most important thing I’ve worked on in my career.”

Submission + - Obamacare exchange sign-ups fall FAR SHORT of forecasts... (washingtonpost.com)

An anonymous reader writes: Enrollment in the insurance exchanges for President Obama’s signature health-care law is at less than half the initial forecast, pushing several major insurance companies to stop offering health plans in certain markets because of significant financial losses.

In other Obamacare news ...
Obamacare insurance market near collapse in Tennessee, state official says
one-third of U.S will have no health insurance choices
Aetna, the nation’s third largest health insurer and faced with $300 million in loses, has decided against expanding its participation in the Obamacare exchanges. They also announced that they are re-evaluating their entire participation in the remaining exchanges.

Obamacare rates are likely to go up from 23% to 45% in Illinois, and 17.3% in Michigan.
Humana, one of the nation’s largest heathcare companies, has decided to leave almost half of its Obamacare markets next year.
Health insurance rates on the Obamacare exchange in California will rise 13% next year.
Presbyterian Health Plan, a major insurer in the New Mexico marketplace, has announced that it will be dropping out of the Obamacare exchange next year.
Oregon’s Health CO-OP in folded July
Within three months of signing up for Obamacare more than 13%, or 1.6 million people, in 2016 have dropped coverage by not paying their premiums.
Blue Cross Blue Shield is losing money in states across the nation, forcing them to request rate increases of more than 50 to 65 percent.
Almost a hundred thousand Coloradans are about to lose their health insurance because of Obamacare.
Ohio’s Obamacare co-op announced in June that it is shutting down, making it the 13 of 23 co-ops to fail.

Comment Re:Pile it on.. (Score 1) 303

I generally support the stated goals of Wikileaks, but complete lack of discretion helps no cause

Discretion? Okay, but who gets to decide what should be kept private and what should be made public? Julian Assange? You give him that power?

That's the problem with sites like Wikileaks and Gawker. Whether the information they publish is about a government or an individual, they can't be trusted to use any discretion.

Submission + - 20% of Scientific Papers On Genes Contain Conversion Errors Caused by Excel (winbeta.org)

An anonymous reader writes: A new report from scientists Mark Ziemann, Yotam Eren, and Assam El-Osta says that 20% of scientific papers on genes contain gene name conversion errors caused by Excel. In the scientific article, titled “Gene name errors are widespread in the scientific literature,” article’s abstract section, the scientists explain: “The spreadsheet software Microsoft Excel, when used with default settings, is known to convert gene names to dates and floating-point numbers. A programmatic scan of leading genomics journals reveals that approximately one-fifth of papers with supplementary Excel gene lists contain erroneous gene name conversions.” It’s easy to see why Excel might have problems with certain gene names when you see the “gene symbols” that the scientists use as examples: “For example, gene symbols such as SEPT2 (Septin 2) and MARCH1 [Membrane-Associated Ring Finger (C3HC4) 1, E3 Ubiquitin Protein Ligase] are converted by default to ‘2-Sep’ and ‘1-Mar’, respectively. Furthermore, RIKEN identifiers were described to be automatically converted to floating point numbers (i.e. from accession ‘2310009E13’ to ‘2.31E+13’). Since that report, we have uncovered further instances where gene symbols were converted to dates in supplementary data of recently published papers (e.g. ‘SEPT2’ converted to ‘2006/09/02’). This suggests that gene name errors continue to be a problem in supplementary files accompanying articles. Inadvertent gene symbol conversion is problematic because these supplementary files are an important resource in the genomics community that are frequently reused. Our aim here is to raise awareness of the problem.”

Submission + - The Neuroscience Behind Bad Decisions (quantamagazine.org)

An anonymous reader writes: Economists have spent more than 50 years cataloging irrational choices like these. Nobel Prizes have been earned; millions of copies of Freakonomics have been sold. But economists still aren’t sure why they happen. “There had been a real cottage industry in how to explain them and lots of attempts to make them go away,” said Eric Johnson, a psychologist and co-director of the Center for Decision Sciences at Columbia University. But none of the half-dozen or so explanations are clear winners, he said.

In the last 15 to 20 years, neuroscientists have begun to peer directly into the brain in search of answers. “Knowing something about how information is represented in the brain and the computational principles of the brain helps you understand why people make decisions how they do,” said Angela Yu, a theoretical neuroscientist at the University of California, San Diego.

Comment Re:Reading comprehension (Score 1) 161

Yup, I didn't RTFA. Also, whoever wrote that article called it "profit" in one place and "industry share" somewhere else.

Reading more closely it appears that neither the 75% nor 30% are a share of profit though. They're the companies' the share of industry wide operating income, which has little to do with profit anyway.

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