Catch up on stories from the past week (and beyond) at the Slashdot story archive


Forgot your password?
Check out the new SourceForge HTML5 internet speed test! No Flash necessary and runs on all devices. ×

Submission + - Asteroids Named for UNIX creators Dennis Ritchie, Ken Thompson

MP7124 writes: Tom Glinos (, Geoff Collyer (Bell Labs — Lucent Tech), and David Levy (Jarnac Observatory) are pleased to announce the naming of asteroids for Dennis Ritchie, and Ken Thompson.

The original Minor Planet Center citations and an orbital animations can be found at:

We find it a fitting tribute to elevate the honorees to the celestial
heavens. UNIX, or a derivative, has provided the underlying technology that has driven a lot of technological advancement over the past few decades.

The lives of everyone on the planet have been touched and made better because of this good work and will continue to do so for decades to come.

Submission + - The Global Intelligence Files: analysis of media coverage of Stratfor leak (

WLPress writes: "On 27 February 2012, WikiLeaks and over 25 media partners began publishing from a database of over 5 million emails dating from July 2004 to December 2011 from the private US-based “global intelligence” company Stratfor. The Stratfor emails illuminate the methods and practices used by private intelligence firms, with little or no accountability or oversight. The emails reveal details about Stratfor’s clients, individuals and groups targeted for surveillance, and the shocking methods used to obtain information."

Submission + - [Videos] Linaro engineers talk about the status of Linux on ARM ( 2

Charbax writes: "Some of the worlds best developers work at Linaro optimizing the future of Linux on ARM. In this 4-hour video series several of them describe software solutions for the upcoming ARM big.LITTLE architecture (ARM Cortex-A15 and ARM Cortex-A7), demonstrate how Linaro Android 4.0.4 runs twice as fast as stock Android 4.0.4 on the TI OMAP4430 Pandaboard, talk about the future of Android, unify the ARM bootloader, combine multiple ARM SoCs into one Linux Kernel for ARM. Canonical works to support ARM Servers, Mark Shuttleworth talks about the opportunity that ARM constitutes for Ubuntu on Laptops and Servers. The CTO of Linaro talks about the next billions of ARM Powered devices that they are working to optimize Linux for."

Submission + - Udacity Announces Certification Option (

mikejuk writes: Online "digital university" Udacity has announced a partnership with Pearson VUE that enables them to offer students the option of a certified credential.
Students will only need to undertake this additional step, which will involve "a nominal fee":
"if they wish to pursue Udacitiy's "official credential and be part of [its] job placement program."
Including an extra final test overcomes one of problems faced by online education — was it really the student who's name appears on the certificate that completed the course and took the test?
Was it that student's own unaided work?
By going to a Pearson Vue testing center your identity can be checked. And by sitting a test your knowledge can be established. However, as the first round of tests for Udacity courses are only 90 minutes, with a multiple choice format and no programming they are not a substitute for the course assessment that currently takes place — and, of course, this is not the intention. The idea is that your identify is checked and the fact that you do know enough for it to be reasonable that you actually took the more difficult online exam is the rational.

Comment Re:Very slow on single core CPU (Score 1) 465

I'd love to know what you did. I've run this since the beta (just updated to the full version) and the only process it runs is MSSecEs.exe which rarely takes up more than 1% of my cpu (2% max) and maybe 8 MB of RAM doing a full scan. So I have to say, your results are NO typical and I think your MsMpEng.exe is from something else you installed, not MSE.

Comment favorite conspiracy theory. (Score 2, Interesting) 465

Okay, now that Microsoft makes an antivirus, someone explain to me why they haven't simply dedicated all this effort to debugging Windows, closing security holes and stabilizing code? Can anyone now sufficiently explain their motivation to do so? I don't see anymore reason for Microsoft to clean up the mess that they made, now that they've thrown a board over the pothole instead of repaving the frickin' road.

If Microsoft makes Windows secure and stable, then, in theory, the antivirus industry is out of business. Someone, please, convince me to remove my tinfoil hat.

Slashdot Top Deals

An inclined plane is a slope up. -- Willard Espy, "An Almanac of Words at Play"