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Microsoft

Submission + - Microsoft Certificate Was Used to Sign "Flame" Malware (securityweek.com) 1

wiredmikey writes: Microsoft disclosed on Sunday that "unauthorized digital certificates derived from a Microsoft Certificate Authority" were used to sign components of the recently discovered "Flame" malware.

“We have discovered through our analysis that some components of the malware have been signed by certificates that allow software to appear as if it was produced by Microsoft,” Microsoft Security Response Center’s Jonathan Ness wrote in a blog post.

Microsoft is also warning that the same techniques could be leveraged by less sophisticated attackers to conduct more widespread attacks.

In response to the discovery, Microsoft released a security advisory detailing steps that organizations should take in order block software signed by the unauthorized certificates, and also released an update to automatically protect customers. Also as part of its response effort, Microsoft said its Terminal Server Licensing Service no longer issues certificates that allow code to be signed.

Facebook

Submission + - Why Facebook's Network Effects are Overrated (mako.cc)

An anonymous reader writes: A lot of people interested in free software, and user autonomy and network services are very worried about Facebook. Folks are worried for the same reason that so many investors are interested: the networks effects brought by hundreds of millions of folks signed up to use the service.

Facebook is vulnerable to the next thing more than many technology firms that have benefited from network effects in the past. If users are given compelling reasons to switch to something else, they can with less trouble and they will.

That compelling reason might be a new social network with better features or an awesome distributed architecture that allows freedom for users and the ability of those users to benefit from new and fantastic things that Facebook's overseers would never let them have and without the things Facebook's users suffer through today. Or it might be a sexier proprietary box to store users' private information. It doesn't mean that I'm not worried about Facebook. I remain deeply worried. It's just not very hard for me to imagine the end.

Submission + - Flame used MS certificates intended for TS licensing (technet.com)

yuhong writes: "From the article:
"What we found is that certificates issued by our Terminal Services licensing certification authority, which are intended to only be used for license server verification, could also be used to sign code as Microsoft. Specifically, when an enterprise customer requests a Terminal Services activation license, the certificate issued by Microsoft in response to the request allows code signing without accessing Microsoft’s internal PKI infrastructure."
Microsoft released an update adding the affected CAs to the Untrusted Certificate Store."

Submission + - College Freshman at Age 9, M.D. at 21 - A Real-World Doogie Howser (chicagotribune.com) 2

An anonymous reader writes: Sho Yano this week will become the yougnest student to get an M.D. from University of Chicargo. He was reading at age 2, writing by 3, and composing music by his 5th birthday. He graduated from Loyola University in three years — summa cum laude, no less. When he entered U. of C.'s prestigious Pritzker School of Medicine at 12, it was into one of the school's most rigorous programs, where students get both their doctorate and medical degrees.

Intelligence is not Yano's only gift — though according to a test he took at age 4, his IQ is too high to accurately measure and is easily above genius level. He is an accomplished pianist who has performed at Ravinia, and he has a black belt in tae kwon do. Classmates and faculty described him as "sweet" and "humble," a hardworking, Bach-adoring, Greek literature-quoting student. And in his own words, "I may not be the most outgoing person, but I do like to be around people." — unlike many self-proclaimed genius-level slashdoters.

Facebook

Submission + - Facebook is down, again (huffingtonpost.com)

Animats writes: "Not just the stock. The Facebook site itself is having problems this weekend.
Facebook has had intermittent outages since Friday, the Huffington Post reports. Right now, DownRightNow reports a "likely service disruption." The symptom is very slow, but valid responses from the site. So far, Facebook hasn't made any public statements."

Submission + - Ask Slashdot: Best way to copy/sync files with remote server while on the road?

An anonymous reader writes: Here's a scenario: you are on a vacation trip for a couple of weeks — on the road. Lots of pictures — 2-300 per day- maybe some text files with short notes etc. You have a camera with Eye-Fi, a PC, and a phone with WiFi and 3G. Files ends up on the PC (mobile storage), phone providesInternet connectivity. Now, if you wanted to upload all files pretty much as you go — given spotty access to Internet over G3 and WiFi — what would be the best way to do that automatically; set-it-and-forget-it style? I would like them to end up on my own server

rsync script?
ownCloud?
Some BitTorrent setup?
Other?

Which one would be the most robust solution? I'm thinking of interrupted file transfers due to no network, re-starts etc. And I would not want to loose any files; including scenarios where files gets deleted locally but that should not result in files getting automatically deleted on the server as well. Sure; I could perhaps use something like Dropbox but that would take the fun out of it :-).
Television

Submission + - DirecTV CEO Doubts Apple TV Can Beat His Set-Tops 1

theodp writes: In a move that evokes memories of Steve Ballmer's initial pooh-poohing of the iPhone threat, DirecTV Chairman Michael White downplayed the Apple TV hype, expressing doubts that 'Apple's interface will be so much better than DirecTVs' that people will be willing to pay for an extra box. So, will White's statement — 'It’s hard to see (it) obsoleting our technology' — come back to haunt him?
PC Games (Games)

Submission + - The Adventure Bundle: Old-School Adventuring in the Underground?

gh0stnaV writes: A very young and fresh generation of old-school point-and-click adventures seems to be quietly brewing in hiding among the grass roots. Several developers have recently organized themselves into yet another bundle, dubbed the Bundle-in-a-Box. Some of the games here are already well-known, e.g. Gemini Rue (Wadjet Eye Games) or Ben There, Dan That! (Size Five Games), but there's also the newcomer The Sea Will Claim Everything (Jonas Kyratzes) as well as a couple of games for those who choose to pay above the current average. Most of the offerings come from one-man teams, as true to the indie tag as can get. The question remains, though: will this underground development model prove viable? And does the world of point-and-click belong only to heavy hitters like Double Fine? Right now, the numbers point to an affirmative on the second question, while the first one hangs in the balance.
Science

Submission + - Ask Slashdot. An online science course which makes full use of the Web?

blubadger writes: Having slept through chemistry at school, I'm looking to fill in the gaps in my science education by following a short online course or two. I've been searching for "Chemistry 101", "Basics of Physics", "Biology Primer", and so on. There's some high-quality stuff on offer – from Academic Earth, MIT and others – but it tends to take the form of videos of traditional university lectures. I was hoping to cut through the chit-chat and blackboards and get straight into the infographics and animations that will help me understand complex ideas. Flash and HTML5 Canvas seem wasted on videos of lectures. If the quality were high enough I would be willing to pay. Have Slashdotters seen anything that fits the bill?

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