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Comment Re:It's not Facebook's Fault. (Score 1) 149

7 megabytes of data takes less than half a second to load at 25 megabits per second. Even if you assume shitty latency (satellite connection) and no browser prefetching (IE6?) you're looking at about 1 whole second.

If pages "load slowly" on a 25mbit connection, it's not the 25mbit connection limiting it. It might be because the server-side PHP/MySQL takes a long time to execute - which would be a problem for all visitors regardless of their connection. It might be because the client-side Javascript takes a long time to execute. Usually, it's a combination of all these things. But unless you are talking about a 1.5 megabit connection, the speed of the visitor's connection isn't going to be the main factor influencing subjective load times.

Comment Re:Silly word (Score 1) 347

I also remember reading on Snopes years ago about some hubbub over the "master/slave" terminology (re: IDE hard disks) and also the word "niggardly." Though, the second case, I could easily see it being a grammar nazi trying to figure out just how many hairs they could split before someone blew up.

Comment Re:Apple: it just works (Score 4, Funny) 347

It's the same cable... with USB-C instead of plain USB.

Not even I thought the Reality Distortion Field had such power as to superimpose two physically disparate cables upon each other.
Dear God... Apple has won. They have achieved the omnipotent powers of transfiguration. The war is lost! Open your wallets and pour out for penance!

Comment Re:Was Obvious from the Start (Score 1) 330

It's not jewelry, it's not a collectible.

What is it then? An extra, tiny screen for your phone? That's the most positive way I can put it, and it seems next to useless when explained that way. I haven't yet heard one feature of these devices that I'd ever use. Much less a "killer app" to justify the cost.
The only justification I can come up with for owning one of these is as a fashion accessory. The statistics in this article are telling me that yes, quite a few people did buy it for that purpose. But now, the iWatch is so 2015. Ah, the fickle flits of fashion.

Comment Re:Shocking! (Score 1) 756

I guess they see these things as revealing, which they are, to an extent. Anyone who is paying attention already knows Trump is an asshole, so there's not much to "leak" regarding that. Hilary has been a politician for decades so she has been a lot more conscious about image control which makes it more news... I guess. She never fooled me though.
I'm way more interested in what they might have on Google. I've got the feeling that the people responsible for the "Do No Evil" motto are gone, or at least subjugated. They just know too much about everything - remember the saying about absolute power corrupting? If there's something to substantiate these feelings, I'll be justified.

Comment Re:I have a out of this world solution (Score 4, Insightful) 70

This piece of malware looked for Word documents, but the next one won't. Maybe it looks for image files, or it looks to see if the web browser has a significant cache built up. Or something more subtle than that. A better idea would be to create system images of used systems, periodically swapping them out, to make it a moving target.

Comment Re: Easy solution to avoid this malware... (Score 5, Insightful) 70

Have you taken a college course or had to deal in a "business-to-business" interaction at all in the past 15 years? They all use the MS Word document format. I took college courses from 2007-2012 at several campuses, of course with different professors... They pretty much all used Word documents to distribute whatever documents they needed to digitally. I think there was maybe 1 course where we were given a link to a PDF. It's not about what you use, it's about what the other guys use.

Comment Re:Powell can't bring himself to vote for Hillary (Score 1) 248

The choice is usually "business as usual vs. business as usual", excepting a few issues that candidates (or really, parties) use to differentiate themselves. Two crappy choices, but equally crappy. Now with Trump it's more like "business as usual vs. total nation-destroying shitshow". There's still no good choice, but the stakes are higher than ever before.
I'll be voting for the first time ever this year, after having been eligible for a decade. Hillary didn't get me to vote. Ted Cruz wouldn't have got me to vote. Trump is getting me to vote... for whoever can win, that isn't him. This is the reason why I think polls are particularly useless in this election. Many of the people who vote this year aren't going to be the "likely voters" that get tracked in the polls.

Comment Re:Suspicious figures (Score 1) 150

There are trees all around my home, trees on my land, wildflowers in my back yard, and pure nature all around.

Some of my previous residences have looked like that too. I won't speak to the situation where you are, but I will relate what I discovered about my locality after putting some thought (and research) into it. From another comment on this article:

The developers have just gotten really good at hiding it: things like strips of trees that border the main roads, blocking the view of the suburban sprawl. Roads that curve pointlessly so that you can't see down the length of them. When you drive through this area you get the impression that it's still somewhat natural land... until you take notice of the long, long lines of cars everywhere. Or the 4-story apartment complexes. Or you take a turn off any main road and get lost in suburbs for days. Or you look at satellite photos from 10 years ago, and compare them to recent photos... that lays it plain. You can hide this stuff from earth-bound humans' line-of-sight pretty well, but not from an aerial photo.

You also have to consider that things that take up a small percentage of the land - like roads - have an impact that extends way beyond the concrete itself. Likely, the definition of "wilderness" they use has to do with humans' effects on ecosystems. Not how aesthetically pleasing it is to homebuyers.

Comment Re:Suspicious figures (Score 1) 150

It depends on how they define "wilderness." I'm currently living in The Woodlands, TX (actual name) which people from Houston consider "the country", but there is an average population density of 2,500 people per square mile. The developers have just gotten really good at hiding it: things like strips of trees that border the main roads, blocking the view of the suburban sprawl. Roads that curve pointlessly so that you can't see down the length of them. When you drive through this area you get the impression that it's still somewhat natural land... until you take notice of the long, long lines of cars everywhere. Or the 4-story apartment complexes. Or you take a turn off any main road and get lost in suburbs for days. Or you look at satellite photos from 10 years ago, and compare them to recent photos... that lays it plain. You can hide this stuff from earth-bound humans' line-of-sight pretty well, but not from an aerial photo.
I haven't studied biology in detail but I don't think you need to hit 2500/mi population density for there to be severe disruptions to an ecosystem. I get the feeling the wilderness loss they're talking about isn't "small town becoming big city", it's "undeveloped land becoming partly developed land". Think of light pollution - the light bulbs themselves take up a minuscule amount of space, but their pollution covers the majority of the planet, already, today.
My personal definition of wilderness is being able to walk for a whole day in any direction without seeing a sign of human activity. The only time I experienced that was in rural Finland almost two decades ago.

Comment Re:Encryption? (Score 1) 761

How come nobody ever brings up EM spectrum pollution when companies push for wireless everything? Or the old-fashioned pollution that comes from all these peripherals suddenly needing to have batteries? Particularly stuff like headphones where there is a negligible benefit to going wireless. (I'd consider it the opposite of a benefit, but I seem to be outside the reality distortion field. Or maybe i'm just not "courageous" enough.)

Comment Re:Never a shortage of Apple hate (Score 1) 761

I doubt it. There are still plenty of other audio applications, consumer and professional, that will use the old-style analog connectors. Nearly all of them, really. And there will be people with more money than sense who will continue to pay the Apple tax. Their phones are going to use some functionality, but those people typically don't use it anyway. People who buy a phone for pragmatic, functional reasons are already buying Androids, and those manufacturers will continue to cater to the power users.

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