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Comment Re:I have a out of this world solution (Score 4, Insightful) 68

This piece of malware looked for Word documents, but the next one won't. Maybe it looks for image files, or it looks to see if the web browser has a significant cache built up. Or something more subtle than that. A better idea would be to create system images of used systems, periodically swapping them out, to make it a moving target.

Comment Re: Easy solution to avoid this malware... (Score 5, Insightful) 68

Have you taken a college course or had to deal in a "business-to-business" interaction at all in the past 15 years? They all use the MS Word document format. I took college courses from 2007-2012 at several campuses, of course with different professors... They pretty much all used Word documents to distribute whatever documents they needed to digitally. I think there was maybe 1 course where we were given a link to a PDF. It's not about what you use, it's about what the other guys use.

Comment Re:Powell can't bring himself to vote for Hillary (Score 1) 248

The choice is usually "business as usual vs. business as usual", excepting a few issues that candidates (or really, parties) use to differentiate themselves. Two crappy choices, but equally crappy. Now with Trump it's more like "business as usual vs. total nation-destroying shitshow". There's still no good choice, but the stakes are higher than ever before.
I'll be voting for the first time ever this year, after having been eligible for a decade. Hillary didn't get me to vote. Ted Cruz wouldn't have got me to vote. Trump is getting me to vote... for whoever can win, that isn't him. This is the reason why I think polls are particularly useless in this election. Many of the people who vote this year aren't going to be the "likely voters" that get tracked in the polls.

Comment Re:Suspicious figures (Score 1) 150

There are trees all around my home, trees on my land, wildflowers in my back yard, and pure nature all around.

Some of my previous residences have looked like that too. I won't speak to the situation where you are, but I will relate what I discovered about my locality after putting some thought (and research) into it. From another comment on this article:

The developers have just gotten really good at hiding it: things like strips of trees that border the main roads, blocking the view of the suburban sprawl. Roads that curve pointlessly so that you can't see down the length of them. When you drive through this area you get the impression that it's still somewhat natural land... until you take notice of the long, long lines of cars everywhere. Or the 4-story apartment complexes. Or you take a turn off any main road and get lost in suburbs for days. Or you look at satellite photos from 10 years ago, and compare them to recent photos... that lays it plain. You can hide this stuff from earth-bound humans' line-of-sight pretty well, but not from an aerial photo.

You also have to consider that things that take up a small percentage of the land - like roads - have an impact that extends way beyond the concrete itself. Likely, the definition of "wilderness" they use has to do with humans' effects on ecosystems. Not how aesthetically pleasing it is to homebuyers.

Comment Re:Suspicious figures (Score 1) 150

It depends on how they define "wilderness." I'm currently living in The Woodlands, TX (actual name) which people from Houston consider "the country", but there is an average population density of 2,500 people per square mile. The developers have just gotten really good at hiding it: things like strips of trees that border the main roads, blocking the view of the suburban sprawl. Roads that curve pointlessly so that you can't see down the length of them. When you drive through this area you get the impression that it's still somewhat natural land... until you take notice of the long, long lines of cars everywhere. Or the 4-story apartment complexes. Or you take a turn off any main road and get lost in suburbs for days. Or you look at satellite photos from 10 years ago, and compare them to recent photos... that lays it plain. You can hide this stuff from earth-bound humans' line-of-sight pretty well, but not from an aerial photo.
I haven't studied biology in detail but I don't think you need to hit 2500/mi population density for there to be severe disruptions to an ecosystem. I get the feeling the wilderness loss they're talking about isn't "small town becoming big city", it's "undeveloped land becoming partly developed land". Think of light pollution - the light bulbs themselves take up a minuscule amount of space, but their pollution covers the majority of the planet, already, today.
My personal definition of wilderness is being able to walk for a whole day in any direction without seeing a sign of human activity. The only time I experienced that was in rural Finland almost two decades ago.

Comment Re:Encryption? (Score 1) 761

How come nobody ever brings up EM spectrum pollution when companies push for wireless everything? Or the old-fashioned pollution that comes from all these peripherals suddenly needing to have batteries? Particularly stuff like headphones where there is a negligible benefit to going wireless. (I'd consider it the opposite of a benefit, but I seem to be outside the reality distortion field. Or maybe i'm just not "courageous" enough.)

Comment Re:Never a shortage of Apple hate (Score 1) 761

I doubt it. There are still plenty of other audio applications, consumer and professional, that will use the old-style analog connectors. Nearly all of them, really. And there will be people with more money than sense who will continue to pay the Apple tax. Their phones are going to use some functionality, but those people typically don't use it anyway. People who buy a phone for pragmatic, functional reasons are already buying Androids, and those manufacturers will continue to cater to the power users.

Comment Re:Needs to be said, won't be listened to (Score 1) 67

You generally have to be at least 25 years old to rent a car. I'm 27... my elementary school had a lab of Apple IIs and System 7 Macs. The first computer I owned ran Windows 95. After using these systems the concept of a file, and data storage, aren't foreign. By the time the iPhone was released I had already graduated high school. It's a knowledge thing, not a generation thing.

Comment Re:Numbing Culture (Score 1) 201

"if one is convinced that the system is stacked against him or her, why go to college in the first place?"
Because it's being offered as the only solution to enter the middle class. Because it lets you feel (and seem) like you're accomplishing something... even though you have serious doubts that you'll get the advertised results.

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