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Comment Re:Enhanced bluetooth, and legacy standards (Score 1) 63

But having it on a kettle or coffee maker or a rice cooker makes no sense.

On a kettle, no.

I'd love it on a coffee maker because I actually use the delay brew feature. Give me a clock that adjust for DST and a delay brew that I can sync to my schedule and I'd be kinda happy.

DST compensation in itself could, IMHO, justify anything with a clock capability to be IoT capable.

It might be useful on a rice cooker (or anything else that takes a long time) for notifying you when it's done cooking.

Submission + - Feds charge 61 people over Indian call center IRS scams

BUL2294 writes: Following the arrests earlier this month in India of call center employees posing as IRS or immigration agents, USA Today and Consumerist are reporting that the US Department of Justice has charged 61 people in the US and India of facilitating the scam, bilking millions from Americans thinking they were facing immediate arrest and prosecution.

"According to the indictment — which covers 20 individuals in the U.S. and 32 people and five call centers in India — since about 2012 the defendants used information obtained from data brokers and other sources to call potential victims impersonating officers from the IRS or U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services."

Submission + - The FCC just passed sweeping new rules to protect your online privacy (washingtonpost.com) 1

jriding writes: Federal regulators have approved unprecedented new rules to ensure broadband providers do not abuse their customers' app usage and browsing history, mobile location data and other sensitive personal information generated while using the Internet.

The rules, passed Thursday in a 3-to-2 vote by the Federal Communications Commission, require Internet providers, such as Comcast and Verizon, to obtain their customers' explicit consent before using or sharing that behavioral data with third parties, such as marketing firms.

Submission + - How Police Body Cameras Fail (fastcompany.com)

tedlistens writes: Since the shooting of unarmed, 18-year-old Michael Brown in 2014—an incident that was not captured on camera—activists and city governments have stridently fought for more police oversight through body-worn cameras, and cities are responding, with the help of millions of dollars in body camera grants from the White House. But the public is discovering that the technology isn't foolproof: Cameras fall off, officers fail to record, and the video itself can be kept largely out of the public record, in deference to privacy laws, police policies, and the challenges of managing massive amounts of footage. But, critics worry, when video collected for oversight purposes isn't shared publicly—or isn’t collected at all—citizens might become more suspicious about police misconduct, amplifying mistrust amid an effort to fight it. An article at Fast Company details ways in which body camera programs are falling short of their goals, and ideas for improving what some have called the most rapid technology upgrade in policing history.

Submission + - FCC Enacts Major New Online Privacy Rule

Trailrunner7 writes: The FCC has voted to enact a new rule that will force broadband companies to get consent from customers before they sell information about those customers’ online movements, history, and other actions.

The new rule will require broadband companies to have customers opt in to the sale or sharing of their online histories as part of marketing or ad deals. It includes restrictions on the way that providers can share users’ location data and other information and also ensures that they will have to tell consumers exactly what data they collect and what they do with it. The changes do not apply to how broadband providers can use customer information in their own marketing, though.

The new regulations also require that broadband providers have “common-sense” data breach notifications and reasonable security practices.

The vote by the FCC makes distinctions between broadband providers and phone carriers and other service providers. Before the vote, providers and others had urged the FCC to align its rules with existing ones from the FTC on usage of customer data for marketing.

Submission + - Tesla shocks Wall St. with huge earnings surprise and actual profits (bgr.com)

anderzole writes: Tesla on Wednesday posted its earnings report for the quarter gone by and investors will have a lot to cheer about. While analysts on Wall St. were expecting Tesla to post a loss, Tesla during its September quarter actually posted a profit, and an impressive profit at that. When the dust settled, Tesla posted a quarterly profit of $22 million and EPS of $0.71. Revenue for the quarter checked in at $2.3 billion.

Illustrating how impressive Tesla’s performance was this past quarter, Wall St. was anticipating Tesla to post a loss amid $1.9 billion in revenue for the quarter.

Submission + - Carriers to Implement Do Not Originate List to Defeat Robocalls

Trailrunner7 writes: An industry led strike force is preparing to take away one of the most valuable pieces of technology used by phone scammers: caller ID spoofing.

The Robocall Strike Force, convened by the FCC and comprising wired and wireline telecom companies, has been working since August on a handful of new technologies, standards, and other techniques to help address the robocall problem. On Wednesday, members of the strike force delivered their report to the FCC and said that a trial of a new Do Not Originate list has shown tremendous promise in preventing scammers from being able to spoof numbers belonging to government agencies, charities, and other legitimate organizations.

A trial of the DNO list that’s been running for the last few weeks on some IRS numbers has resulted in a 90 percent drop in the volume of IRS scam calls, officials from AT&T, which leads the strike force, said during the FCC meeting Wednesday. The carriers on the strike force, which include Sprint, Verizon, and many others, plan to continue testing the DNO list in the coming months, with the intent to fully implement it some time next year.

Comment Re:Calling all rockets (Score 1) 136

I get this feeling too about Consumer Reports. While I think some of their studies are helpful, and they try to fill an important role, I always end up wanting more detail than what they offer. They collect a lot of data but withhold all the details. I don't feel that their data analysis is very good. But maybe I just get that impression because I want to see statistical uncertainties, ranges, actual numbers, etc. Since that's all hidden from readers, I tend to assume their ratings are bogus.

Submission + - The Future of Sustainable Farming Might Be Bugs (xconomy.com)

gthuang88 writes: The idea of insects as a protein source to feed the world isn’t new. But the U.S. agtech industry may be warming up to it. Now a Seattle startup called Beta Hatch is growing and harvesting mealworms and their waste, about 600 pounds a week, and packaging them as chicken feed and fertilizer. The goal is to be healthier and more eco-friendly than traditional feed, which uses soy. Together with companies like Tiny Farms, Exo, and Six Foods, this represents a new wave of efforts to commercialize insects for sustainable food and farming.

Largest Auto-Scandal Settlement In US History: Judge Approves $15 Billion Volkswagen Settlement (usatoday.com) 116

A federal just has approved the largest auto-scandal settlement in U.S. history, a $14.7 billion settlement concerning Volkswagen Group's diesel car emissions scandal. USA Today reports: U.S. District Court Judge Charles Breyer in San Francisco approved the sweeping agreement between consumers, the government, California regulators and the German automaker in a written ruling a week after signaling he was likely to sign off. He said the agreement is "fair, reasonable and adequate." The settlement comes about a year after Volkswagen admitted that it rigged 11 million vehicles worldwide with software designed to dodge emissions standards. The company is still facing criminal investigations by the U.S. Justice Department and German prosecutors. The U.S. probe could lead to additional financial penalties and criminal indictments. About 475,000 Volkswagen owners in the U.S. can choose between a buyback or a free fix and compensation, if a repair becomes available. VW will begin administering the settlement immediately, having already devoted several hundred employees to handling the process. Buybacks range in value from $12,475 to $44,176, including restitution payments, and varying based on milage. People who opt for a fix approved by the Environmental Protection Agency will receive payouts ranging from $5,100 to $9,852, depending on the book value of their car. Volkswagen will also pay $2.7 billion for environmental mitigation and another $2 billion for clean-emissions infrastructure.

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