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Comment Re:Battery cases prove market for fatter phone (Score 1) 318

It doesn't make it awkward at all. The external batteries are easily pocketable, and a short bit of cable isn't a problem. I have a MiFi with a battery you can swap, but I've never swapped the battery - it's easier and simpler just to plug it into an external battery when the charge gets low.

Comment Re: sure! (Score 2) 294

Yeah, I've got the obession with gold as a sound post-apocalypse move. It might do well when the financial markets are in turmoil, but that's only because investors tend to flee to the commodities market when that happens, yet the chance of an apocalypse that cripples the financial markets yet leaves the commodities intact is... well, zero. It seems far more likely that post apocalypse the things you are going to need to survive and eventually (not to mention hopefully) trade with are going to be far more fundamental; food, water, fuel, livestock, manual and basic mechanical tools (in all their forms) and other basic supplies. The slightly longer term view might be things like seed stocks, construction materials and other other things necessary for some form of civilization to try and get back on its feet, but gold... not for quite some time, I'd imagine.

Another way to look at it; when Europeans were heading west across and establishing settlements across what would later become the US and Canada, how long did it take before currency (or company scrip) really took over from bartering as the defacto means of trade? And that's in an environment where there was (mostly) a lot of co-operation going into pushing on towards the Pacific and building a viable colony in the wake of the wagon trains that would be needed to help support them once they settled. Assuming that is the kind of environment that you are going to find when you crawling out of your bunker dragging your pile of gold seems like it's ruling out a lot of more likely, more violent, and far more long-term scenarios than all the survivors giving each other a pat on the back and getting straight on with rebuilding civilization.

Submission + - Rosetta's 12-year mission ends with landing on comet (sciencemag.org)

sciencehabit writes: It was an unusual grand finale. The crowded European Space Agency (ESA) operations center in Darmstadt, Germany, waited in silence and then the signal from the descending Rosetta mission simply stopped at 1.19 pm local time showing that the spacecraft had, presumably, landed on comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko some 40 minutes earlier, due to the time the signal takes to reach Earth. Mission controllers hugged each other; there was gentle applause from onlookers; and that was it.

There were no last minute crises. Seven of Rosetta’s instruments kept gathering data until the end. Holger Sierks, principal investigator of the 12-year mission’s main camera, showed the gathered staff, officials, and journalists Rosetta’s final picture: a rough gravelly surface with a few larger rocks covering an area 10 meters across. Earlier, it had snapped the interior of deep pits on the comet (shown above, from an altitude of 5.8 kilometers) that may show the building blocks it is made of. “It’s very crude raw data but this will keep us busy,” Sierks said. It is hoped that this last close-up data grab will help to clarify the many scientific questions raised by Rosetta.

Submission + - Security analyst says Yahoo!, Dropbox, LinkedIn, Tumblr all popped by same gang (theregister.co.uk)

mask.of.sanity writes: Five hackers are said to be behind breaches totalling up to a staggering three billion credentials from some of the world's biggest tech companies including the 2014 breach of Yahoo! that led to the loss of 500 million credentials .

The hacks are attributed to the so-called Group E, a small Eastern European hacking outfit that makes cash breaching companies and selling to buyers including nation states.

Submission + - The Americas Are Now Officially 'Measles-Free' (theverge.com)

An anonymous reader writes: The Americas are now free of measles and we have vaccines to thank, the Pan American Health Organization said earlier this week. This is the first region in the world to be declared measles-free, despite longtime efforts to eliminate the disease entirely. The condition — which causes flu-like symptoms and a blotchy rash — is one of the world’s most infectious diseases. It’s transmitted by airborne particles or direct contact with someone who has the disease and is highly contagious, especially among small children. To be clear, there are still people with measles in the Americas, but the only cases develop from strains picked up overseas. Still, the numbers are going down: in the US this year, there have been 54 cases, down from 667 two years ago. The last case of measles that developed in the Americas was in 2002. (It took such a long time to declare the region measles-free because of various bureaucratic issues.) Health officials say that credit for this victory goes to efforts to vaccinate against the disease. Though the measles, mumps, and rubella (MMR) vaccine is recommended for all children and required by many states, anti-vaxxers have protested it due to since-discredited claims that vaccines can cause autism.

Submission + - [IMPORTANT] Introducing G Suite, formerly Google Apps

wjcofkc writes: I just received the following email from Google. When I saw the title, my first thought was that there was malware lying at the end, further inspection proved it to be real. Is the the dumbest name change in the history of name changes? Google of all companies does not have to try so hard.

Hello Google Apps Customer,

We created Google Apps to help people everywhere work and innovate together, so that your organization can move faster and achieve more. Today, we're introducing a new name that better reflects this mission: G Suite. Over the coming weeks, you'll see our new name and logo appear in familiar places, including the Admin console, Help Center, and on your invoice. G Suite is still the same all-in-one solution that you use every day, with the same powerful tools—Gmail, Docs, Drive, and Calendar. Thanks for being part of the journey that led us to G Suite. We're always improving our technology so it learns and grows with your team.

Visit our official blog post to learn more.

Submission + - Microsoft Forms New AI Research Group Led By Harry Shum (techcrunch.com)

An anonymous reader writes: A day after announcing a new artificial intelligence partnership with IBM, Google, Facebook and Amazon, Microsoft is upping the ante within its own walls. The tech giant announced that it is creating a new AI business unit, the Microsoft AI and Research Group, which will be led by Microsoft Research EVP Harry Shum. Shum will oversee 5,000 computer scientists, engineers and others who will all be “focused on the company’s AI product efforts,” the company said in an announcement. The unit will be working on all aspects of AI and how it will be applied at the company, covering agents, apps, services and infrastructure. Shum has been involved in some of Microsoft’s biggest product efforts at the ground level of research, including the development of its Bing search engine, as well as in its efforts in computer vision and graphics: that is a mark of where Microsoft is placing its own priority for AI in the years to come. Important to note that Microsoft Research unit will no longer be its on discrete unit — it will be combined with this new AI effort. Research had 1,000 people in it also working on areas like quantum computing, and that will now be rolled into the bigger R&D efforts being announced today. Products that will fall under the new unit will include Information Platform, Cortana and Bing, and Ambient Computing and Robotics teams led by David Ku, Derrick Connell and Vijay Mital, respectively. The Microsoft AI and Research Group will encompass AI product engineering, basic and applied research labs, and New Experiences and Technologies (NExT), Microsoft said.

Submission + - Multiple Linux Distributions Affected by Crippling Bug in systemd (agwa.name) 1

An anonymous reader writes: System administrator Andrew Ayer has discovered a potentially critical bug in systemd which can bring a vulnerable Linux server to its knees with one command. "After running this command, PID 1 is hung in the pause system call. You can no longer start and stop daemons. inetd-style services no longer accept connections. You cannot cleanly reboot the system." According to the bug report, Debian, Ubuntu, and CentOS are among the distros susceptible to various levels of resource exhaustion. The bug, which has existed for more than two years, does not require root access to exploit.

Submission + - Man arrested for 'jailbreaking' iPhones (nhk.or.jp)

An anonymous reader writes: Japanese police have arrested a hacker for illegally removing software restrictions on Apple's iPhones and selling the devices.

Daisuke Ikeda, who is 24 and from Toyama City, is suspected of what's called "jailbreaking" and infringing Apple's intellectual property rights.

Police say Ikeda removed software restrictions imposed by iOS, iPhone's operating system, and sold five such devices on an online auction site around April. They say the suspect has admitted the allegation.

Submission + - Researcher find D-Link DWR-932 router is "chock full of holes"

JustAnotherOldGuy writes: Security researcher Pierre Kim has unearthed a bucketload of vulnerabilities in the LTE router/portable wireless hotspot D-Link DWR-932. Kim found the latest available firmware has these vulnerabilities:

- Two backdoor accounts with easy-to-guess passwords that can be used to bypass the HTTP authentication used to manage the router
- A default, hardcoded Wi-Fi Protected Setup (WPS) PIN, as well as a weak WPS PIN generation algorithm
- Multiple vulnerabilities in the HTTP daemon
- Hardcoded remote Firmware Over The Air credentials
- Lowered security in Universal Plug and Play, and more.

“At best, the vulnerabilites are due to incompetence; at worst, it is a deliberate act of security sabotage from the vendor,” says Kim, and advises users to stop using the device until adequate fixes are provided.

Submission + - Microsoft Abandons Modules, Reverts to Traditional Data Center Design (datacenterfrontier.com)

miller60 writes: After years of deploying cloud capacity in enclosures resembling shipping containers, Microsoft has updated its data center design, returning to a more traditional data hall with a slab floor and hot-aisle containment. The new Generation 5 design also uses a fan wall to manage airflow through the server rooms. The redesign arrives as Microsoft’s cloud computing business is experiencing rapid growth, as the company continues to both build its own data centers and also leasing third-party "wholesale" IT space. Microsoft says the previous modular design, which it had used since 2008, was extremely efficient but it couldn't manufacture the enclosures fast enough to keep pace with its cloud deployments.

Submission + - The Yahoo Hackers Weren't State-Sponsored, Security Firm Says (csoonline.com)

itwbennett writes: After Yahoo raised eyebrows in the security community with its claim that state-sponsored hackers were responsible for the history-making breach, security firm InfoArmor now says it has evidence to the contrary. InfoArmor claims to have acquired some of the stolen information as part of its investigation into 'Group E,' a team of five professional hackers-for-hire believed to be from Eastern Europe. The database that InfoArmor has contains only 'millions' of accounts, but it includes the users' login IDs, hashed passwords, mobile phone numbers and zip codes, said Andrew Komarov, InfoArmor's chief intelligence officer. Earlier this week, Chase Cunningham, director of cyber operations at security provider A10 Networks called Yahoo's claim of state-sponsored actors a convenient, if trumped up, excuse: 'If I want to cover my rear end and make it seem like I have plausible deniability, I would say 'nation-state actor' in a heartbeat.'

Submission + - Deep Space Network glitches worry scientists (sciencemag.org)

sciencehabit writes: Earlier this year, the Cassini spacecraft screwed up an orbital maneuver at Saturn because of a problem with its radio connection to Earth. The incident was one of several recent glitches in the Deep Space Network (DSN), NASA’s complex of large radio antennas in California, Spain, and Australia. For more than 50 years, the DSN has been the lifeline for nearly every spacecraft beyond Earth’s orbit, relaying commands from mission control and receiving data from the distant probe. On 30 September, in a meeting at NASA headquarters, officials will brief planetary scientists on the network’s status. Many are worried, based on anecdotal reports, that budget cuts and age have taken a toll that could endanger the complex maneuvers that Cassini and Juno, a spacecraft now at Jupiter, will require over the next year.

Submission + - Mozilla Trials Native Firefox Ad Blocking Tools For All 1

Mickeycaskill writes: Mozilla could add a degree of native ad blocking to Firefox in a future release if a test of the ‘Tracking Protection’ feature in the browser is successful.

Tracking Protection arrived with Firefox 42 last November, giving users control over what types of data third parties received from their browsing. This could mean certain online advertisements might not display properly.

However until now, Tracking Protection has been limited to private browsing. Mozilla is looking at extending this protection to all tabs but first needs to see where the feature “breaks” the web – this includes ads.

To achieve this, it is inviting users to participate in a ‘Test Pilot’, a scheme which sees Firefox users test experimental features in the early stage of development.

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