Become a fan of Slashdot on Facebook

 



Forgot your password?
typodupeerror
Get HideMyAss! VPN, PC Mag's Top 10 VPNs of 2016 for 55% off for a Limited Time ×

Comment Re:Corporate VPNs too? (Score 1) 109

True, but since it doesn't actually ban the use of VPNs, a better question would be how would they *know* whether I was using a VPN to access a site they had blocked or just accessing some perfectly legal resource that they haven't proscribed like a corporate server? From the UAE's perspective VPN traffic leaving the UAE is VPN traffic leaving the UAE, no more no less - they have no way of knowing the ultimate end point, only the address of VPN server I'm connected to.

I suspect if there is an answer it's going to involve some morally bankrupt company like Blue Coat Systems, isn't it?

Submission + - Getty Sued For $1 Billion For Selling Publicly Donated Photos

An anonymous reader writes: Online stock media library Getty Images is facing a $1 billion lawsuit from an American photographer for illegally selling copyright for thousands of photos. The Seattle-based company has been sued by documentary photographer Carol Highsmith for ‘gross misuse’, after it sold more than 18,000 of her photos despite having already donated them for public use. Highsmith’s photos which were sold via Getty Images had been available for free via the Library of Congress. Getty has now been accused of selling unauthorised licenses of the images, not crediting the author, and for also sending threatening warnings and fines to those who had used the pictures without paying for the falsely imposed copyright.

Submission + - Tor Project Confirms Sexual Misconduct By Developer Jacob Appelbaum (theverge.com)

An anonymous reader writes: The Tor Project, a nonprofit known for its online anonymity software, says it has verified claims that former employee Jacob Appelbaum engaged in "sexually aggressive behavior" with people inside and outside of its organization. "We have confirmed that the events did take place as reported," Shari Steele, Tor's executive director, tells The Verge. In a blog post today, Steele says that Tor began an investigation into Appelbaum's behavior after several people came forward with allegations of misconduct in late May. In a statement made in June, he said the allegations were "entirely false." He resigned from the Tor Project in May. "I want to thank all the people who broke the silence around Jacob's behavior," Steele writes. "It is because of you that this issue has now been addressed. I am grateful you spoke up, and I acknowledge and appreciate your courage." Steele says that Tor is now implementing a new anti-harassment policy, as well as a process for submitting complaints and having them reviewed. The changes will be put in place this week. Tor also announced last month that it would replace its entire board of directors.

Submission + - Tesla and Autopilot Supplier Mobileye Split Up After Fatal Crash (usatoday.com)

An anonymous reader writes: Tesla and Mobileye, one of the top suppliers to its Autopilot partial self-driving system, are parting ways in the wake of the May accident that killed an owner of one of its electric Model S sedans. Mobileye is considered a leader in developing the equipment that will be needed for fully self-driving cars. The Israeli tech company will continue to support and maintain current Tesla products, including upgrades that should help the Autopilot system with crash avoidance and to better allow the car to steer itself, said Chairman Amnon Shashua in releasing the company's second-quarter earnings Tuesday. Shashua said moving cars to higher levels of self-driving capability "is a paradigm shift both in terms of function complexity and the need to ensure an extremely high level of safety." He added there is "much at stake" in terms of Mobileye's reputation, and that it is best to end the relationship with Tesla by the end of the year. Tesla CEO Elon Musk, meeting with reporters at the company's new battery Gigafactory outside Reno, indicated that Tesla can go forward without Mobileye. “Us parting ways was somewhat inevitable. There’s nothing unexpected here from our standpoint," Musk said. "We’re committed to autonomy. They’ll go their way, and we’ll go ours."

Submission + - ALS Ice Bucket Challenge Funding Leads To New Genetic Findings (yahoo.com)

An anonymous reader writes: Researchers are crediting the ALS Ice Bucket Challenge, a fundraiser for amyotrophic lateral sclerosis that went viral in 2014, for funding a new study that has possibly identified a common gene that contributes to the nervous system disease. Yahoo reports via Good Morning America: "In a study published in The Nature Genetics Journal, researchers from various institutions, including the University of Massachusetts Medical School and the University Medical Center Utrecht, identified the gene NEK1 as a common gene that could have an impact on who develops the disease. Variants of the gene appear to lead to increased risk of developing ALS, according to preliminary findings. Researchers in 11 countries studied 1,000 families in which a family member developed ALS and conducted a genome-wide search for any signs that a gene could be leading to increased ALS risk. After identifying the NEK1 gene, they also analyzed 13,000 individuals who had developed ALS despite no family history and found they had variants in that same gene, again linking that gene with increased ALS risk. Starting in the summer of 2014, the ALS Ice Bucket Challenge led to 17 million videos made and $220 million raised, according to the ALS Association — $115 million of which went to the association."

Comment Re:32% would vote clinton (Score 3, Insightful) 453

Ever see the movie "Sophie's Choice", read the book, or at least know the basis of the plot? This election strikes me as kind of like that, only with some extra options (to allow for voting for an alternative or not voting at all) - please choose between the following options:

A) Save your son, but your daughter dies
B) Save your daughter, but your son dies
C) Save your children, but you die
D) Don't pick and let someone else choose who dies

There simply is no "good" choice, and you are probably going to end up regretting your decision one way or another no matter what you do.

Submission + - SPAM: Western Digital Announces Breakthrough 64-Layer 3D NAND Tech

An anonymous reader writes: Western Digital has unveiled the world’s first 64-layer 3D NAND technology, which it promises will deliver bigger and significantly faster SSD flash memory solutions in the future. Alongside Toshiba, the American storage firm has developed the 3D NAND technology which counts an impressive 64 layers of vertically-stacked storage. The product is named BiCS3, continuing from the previous BiCS2 generation, and stores up to 3-bits-per-cell – the industry’s smallest. WD says that this capability allows for much improved capacity, as well as boosted performance and reliability. WD has already started production, but the company noted that while volume shipments would begin in late 2016, ‘meaningful commercial volumes’ would not be recorded until the beginning of 2017.

Submission + - LastPass accounts can be 'completely compromised' when users visit sites (theregister.co.uk)

mask.of.sanity writes: A dangerous zero-day vulnerability has been found in popular cloud password vault LastPass, which can completely compromise user accounts when users visit malicious websites. The flaw is today being reported to LastPass by established Google Project zero hacker Tavis Ormandy who says he has found other "obvious critical problems".

Submission + - Subscribers Pay 61 Cents/Hour of Cable, But Only 20 Cents/Hour of Netflix (allflicks.net)

An anonymous reader writes: The folks at AllFlicks decided to crunch some numbers to determine just how much more expensive cable is than Netflix. They answered the question: how much does Netflix cost per hour of content viewed, and how does that compare with cable's figures? AllFlicks reports: "We know from Netflix’s own numbers that Netflix’s more than 75 million users stream 125 million hours of content every day. So that’s (roughly) 100 minutes per user, per day. Using the price of Netflix’s most popular plan ($9.99) and a 30-day month, we can say that the average user is paying about 0.33 cents per minute of content, or 20 cents an hour. Not bad! But what about cable? Well, Nielsen tells us that the average American adult cable subscriber watches 2,260 minutes of TV per week (including timeshifted TV). That’s equivalent to 5.38 hours per day, or 161.43 hours per 30-day month. Thanks to Leichtman Research, we know that the average American pays $99.10 per month for cable TV. That means that subscribers are paying a whopping 61.4 cents per hour to watch cable TV – more than three times as much as users pay per hour of Netflix!"

Submission + - 'Sister Clones' Of Dolly The Sheep Have Aged Like Any Other Sheep, Study Says (npr.org)

An anonymous reader writes: About four years ago, Kevin Sinclair inherited an army of clones. "Daisy, Debbie, Denise and Diana," says Sinclair, a developmental biologist at the University of Nottingham in England. "'Sister clones' probably best describes them," Sinclair says. "They actually come from the exactly the same batch of cells that Dolly came from." In an article out Tuesday in the journal Nature Communications, Sinclair and his colleagues write that the ewes' age, along with their strapping health, might be a reason for people to start feeling more optimistic about what cloning can do. Dolly's life did not turn out as scientists in the cloning field hoped it would. She died young — 6 1/2 — with a nasty lung virus. "That was really just bad luck," Sinclair says, and had "nothing to do" with the fact that Dolly was a clone. It was a daunting concept for those in the cloning field, because, says Sinclair, "If you're going to create these animals, they should be normal in every respect. They should be just as healthy as any other animal that's conceived naturally. If that is not the case, then it raises serious ethical and welfare concerns about creating these animals in the first place." But, the good health of the 13 clones in the Nottingham herd suggest better prospects for the procedure. Sinclair and his colleagues evaluated the animals' blood pressure, metabolism, heart function, muscles and joints, looking for signs of premature aging. They even fattened them up (since obesity is a risk factor for metabolic problems including diabetes) and gave them the standard tests to gauge how their bodies would handle glucose and insulin. The results? Normal, normal, normal. "There is nothing to suggest that these animals were anything other than perfectly normal," says Sinclair. They had slight signs of arthritis (Debbie in particular), but not enough to cause problems. "If I put them in with a bunch of other sheep, you would never be able to identify them," he says.

Submission + - Highest-Paid CEOs Run Worst-Performing Companies, Research Finds (independent.co.uk)

An anonymous reader writes: According to a study carried out by corporate research firm MSCI, CEO's that get paid the most run some of the worst-performing companies. It found that every $100 invested in companies with the highest-paid CEOs would have grown to $265 over 10 years. However, the same amount invested in the companies with the lowest-paid CEOs would have grown to $367 over 10 years. The report, titled "Are CEOs paid for performance? Evaluating the Effectiveness of Equity Incentives," looked at the salaries of 800 CEOs at 429 large and medium-sized U.S. companies between 2005 and 2014 and compared it with the total shareholder return of the companies. Senior corporate governance research at MSCI, Ric Marshall, said in a statement: "The highest paid had the worse performance by a significant margin. It just argues for the equity portion of CEO pay to be more conservative."

Submission + - EU Plans To Create Database Of Bitcoin Users With Identities & Wallet Addres (softpedia.com)

An anonymous reader writes: The European Commission is proposing the creation of a database that will hold information on users of virtual currencies. The database will record data on the user's real world identity, along with all associated wallet addresses.

The database will be made available to financial investigation agencies in order to track down users behind suspicious operations. The creation of this database is part of a regulatory push that the EU got rolling after the Paris November 2015 terror attacks, and which it officially put forward in February 2016, and later approved at the start of July 2016. Legally, this is an attempt to reform the Anti-Money Laundering Directive (AMLD). The current draft is available here.

Slashdot Top Deals

Moneyliness is next to Godliness. -- Andries van Dam

Working...