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Submission + - Intel unofficially cuts prices for its x86 CPUs across the board 1

Artem Tashkinov writes: In an expected turn of events, now that AMD Ryzen is less than a week away from going public, Intel has unofficially cut prices for a long range of its CPUs. The biggest price cuts involve the following CPUs:
  • Intel Core i7-6850K, Broadwell, 3.6GHz, 6 cores (with HT), LGA 2011-3, was $700, now $550 (21% off)
  • Intel Core i7-6800K, Broadwell, 3.4GHz, 6 cores (with HT), LGA 2011-3, was $500, now $360 (28% off)
  • Intel Core i7-5820K, Haswell, 3.3GHz, 6 cores (with HT), LGA 2011-3, was $420, now $320 (24% off)
  • Intel Core i7-6700K, SkyLake, 4.0GHz, 4 cores (with HT), LGA 1151, was $400, now $260 (35% off)
  • Intel Core i7-6600K, SkyLake, 3.5GHz, 4 cores (with HT), LGA 1151, was $270, now $180 (33% off)

It's so good to finally have a competition in the x86 CPU market back after more than ten years since Intel released its Core 2 CPUs.

Comment Re:What's normal? What's low when you are 60? 70? (Score 1) 138

You haven't been keeping up with research in other countries. The WHI results were not duplicated when proper cohort selection was done. And as I pointed out, even their numbers were misinterpreted by their own people. That's what happens when you try to fudge data to make a manufacturer's product look good - your fudge factors can really turn on you and bite you in the ass.

The studies HAVE been done in Europe, and the recommendations are clear - all women who do not have a family predisposition to cancers that grow faster when exposed to estrogen and don't have lifestyle risk factors (esp. smoking and obesity) should be encouraged to go on HRT within 5 years of signs of menopause.

The benefits to the cardiovascular system clearly outweigh the small incidental risk of stroke (and that stroke risk is mostly among people with the aforementioned lifestyle diseases). The caveat is to NOT include any forms of progestins - they are not needed, and increase risks. Straight estradiol alone is enough.

And as I pointed out, menopause is extremely unnatural among mammals. Out of all the thousands of mammals, there's just two marine species and humans. It's a genetic defect that wasn't weeded out because it's negative impact on species survival wasn't sufficient to remove it, same as many other negative genes continue to persist in the human genome.

Comment Re:Finally (Score 1) 359

This is a different debate question than "internet is a net-bad for society". I haven't really thought too much about that question, but off the top of my head, do you support cutting off an Iranian med student's access to internet documentation on the basis of the country they were born in being a 'bad actor'?

Let me fix that for you.

"This is a different debate question than "internet is a net-bad for society". I haven't really thought too much about that question, but off the top of my head, do you support cutting off an American med student's access to internet documentation on the basis of the country they were born in being a 'bad actor'?

Iran wouldn't be a theocracy if it hadn't been for the US overthrowing the democratic, secular government and installing the Shah of Iran.

The blocking would be done by each country. If the US were to block Iran, Iranians would still have access to 95% of the worlds population. But they wouldn't hear nearly as much noise about Donald Trump. Some people would see that as a bonus. Heck, some people would be lobbying for their individual states to block the crap coming out of Washington.

I could get behind a global filter blocking everything with the terms "Donald Trump" and "Milo Yiannoppoulos" and "Breitbart" - it would be at least as effective as dumping prozac into the water supply, and we'd be able to move the doomsday clock back a minute from midnight.

Comment Re:From what I see, AMD's done a GOOD job! (Score 1) 279

You can get a temporary ban (I wonder if it's still the "pink page of death") by having too many down-mods - even with excellent karma (go figure). I wouldn't call that censorship any more than having a comment down-modded to -1. It's just a feature of the system, same as rate-limiting, that has no permanent effect.

Comment Re:Thats fine by me (Score 1) 138

And yet in everyday life it doesn't make a difference. Power steering, power brakes, and soon self-driving cars and trucks. Many jobs don't require sheer muscle mass any more. Besides, most men seem to be incapable of generating enough muscle effort to even change the roll of toilet paper (a stereotype that's nevertheless based on plenty of observation).

Comment Re:What's normal? What's low when you are 60? 70? (Score 1) 138

The "scandal" with ERT (Estrogen Replacement Therapy) was bullshit of the first degree. The Women's Health Initiative study was seriously flawed, used horse estrogen and horse progestins with over 50 impurities exclusively that would not be approved under current FDA rules (not human-identical estrogens), had a strong selection bias towards women who were far from good candidates (far too many older, obese women than representative of the population, most had been post-menopausal for a LONG tim), and the mathematical analysis, when redone by the Brits, gave different numbers.

We now know that HRT for women protects bones as well as the cardiovascular system in general. The risk of stroke is mostly for those who are +10 years menopausal when they start HRT, take progestins as well, smoke, and are obese. For women who do not meet these criteria, it's now recommended again, except in North America, where retractions of erroneous studies never receive the bad publicity they deserve. Throw in lower risks of depression and demantia and HRT should be on every woman's preventative healthcare checklist before it's too late.

The "grandfathering" of equine (horse) hormones for the treatment of menopause in humans isn't going to change because of the $$$$ the company still makes off it, even though there's a known liver risk that isn't present with human estrogens.

BTW, menopause is not a "normal part of life." There are only humans and 2 species of whale (out of more than 80) that go through menopause. It should be treated as the genetic disorder that it is.

Comment Re:How about muscles and virility? (Score 5, Informative) 138

We talk about osteoporosis in women, where 34% of all women will at one point in their lives break a hip, but in men it''s far worse - 56%. And 1 out of 10 people who fractures their hip never goes home. If taking a pill can avoid spending the rest of your life in long-term care, it's probably worth the risks. Quality of life is paramount.

The easy way to find out is get a bone density scan on your spine and femur. (the ones that just do the forearm or heal are bs in comparison). It will alert you to osteopenia as well as osteoporosis.

More studies are needed because the effects of hormones can vary greatly depending on the individual, as well as at what point in their life they're at. Identifying those who would benefit while ruling out those at greatest risk (or better yet, treating them like adults and letting them make the decision after being given all the information - you know, "informed consent", rather than "no, we've decided it's too risky for you, take our word for it").

Comment Re:Cataracts and Suse (Score 1) 6

Here they start at $300. However, I don't know if I want them. They're still not completely there. One out of 200 have so many problems they have them removed. Leaves me wondering how many have problems but don't want to face another round of surgery ...

I've always been near-sighted, so it wouldn't be any big deal to get fixed-focus lenses that are optimal for near vision. Glasses would handle regular vision, same as they always have. Or I could get fixed-sight lenses for normal vision, and reading glasses for reading and stuff. Either way, avoid the halos around lights, etc. that come with variable-focus lenses.

I really don't know what the best solution is. I'll discuss it with my doctors and see what they think is best for my situation.

Mandrake 6 and 7 were ahead of the pack. Too bad they couldn't keep it up :-(

Comment Re:The whole "blue light thing" is pure BS. (Score 1) 118

1. Moonlight can be bright enough to read a book by. But it's not brightness that's the problem, or just closing your eyes would eliminate the "problem." It doesn't, because the problem is between the ears, not an actual real effect.

2. Turn on the room lights and the relative brightness of the monitor becomes a non-problem, People working in dark rooms are retarded.

3. Also, buy a better monitor and you'll be able to dim it. However, that's not the problem, as per 2. Again, turn on the room lights to a decent brightness.

House LED lighting is irrelevant to the issue of blue lights and computers in rooms with adequate daylight. More relevant to a good night's sleep would be getting away from the keyboard and taking the dog for a walk before going to bed, instead of taking your phone or tablet or laptop into bed. Nowadays bosses expect us to be "on" 24/7, and almost as bad, we see it as a badge of honor to be always on top of things. Stupid, self-defeating, self-destructive behaviour, but that's how low high tech has sunk.

The real issue is work/life balance. Get that right and "blue light" won't interfere with your life.

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