Slashdot is powered by your submissions, so send in your scoop

 



Forgot your password?
typodupeerror
Check out the new SourceForge HTML5 internet speed test! No Flash necessary and runs on all devices. ×

Comment Re:First they have to find the cause (Score 1) 64

The November date is really a soonest-possible date, I suspect. In early discussion after the incident, I saw it mentioned that Pad 40 will likely be out of commission for a year, and that the next option would be Pad 39A, which is supposed to be ready in November.

I suspect the hope is that by the time the pad is ready they will understand the failure and have taken remedial action. I doubt they'd be permitted to launch anything without some sort of root cause and remedy.

Submission + - Mysterious sudden demise of world's most dangerous exploit kit Angler is solved (theregister.co.uk)

mask.of.sanity writes: On June 7, Angler, possibly history's most advanced financially-driven exploit kit went silent and nobody knew why. Now Kaspersky's lead intelligence researcher has revealed it was the progeny of some 50 arrested hackers known as the Lurk group. The report is the culmination of some six years of research and bookends the mysterious demise of one of the biggest threats to end users on the internet.

Submission + - SPAM: Lost Doctor Story to be released as animation

BigBadBus writes: The lost 1966 Doctor Who story, "The Power of the Daleks" is to be released in an animated version according to the UK Mirror Newspaper. The story is significant as it is the first story to feature the newly regenerated Doctor, starring Patrick Troughton. However, only a few live action clips exist from the story. For weeks now, BBC Worldwide have issued takedown orders to anyone leaking animated clips on YouTube.
There are still 97 live action episodes missing however; the last were unearthed in 2013.

Submission + - SETI has observed a "strong" signal that may originate from a Sun-like star (arstechnica.com) 1

An anonymous reader writes: The RATAN-600 radio telescope in Zelenchukskaya, Russia has detected a strong signal around 11 GHz (which is very unlikely to be naturally-caused) coming from HD164595, a star nearly identical in mass to the Sun and located about 95 light years from Earth. The system is known to have at least one planet.

If the signal were isotropic, it would seem to indicate a Kardashev Type II civilization.

While it is too early to draw any conclusions, the discovery will be discussed at an upcoming SETI committee meeting on September 27th.

Submission + - The emotional side of the H-1B visa program explained (computerworld.com)

An anonymous reader writes: The vast majority of people who work in IT did everything right: They invested in their education, studied difficult subjects, kept their skills updated. They own homes, raise families and look to the future. But no job is safe, no future entirely secure — something IT workers know more than most. Given their role, they are most often the change agents, the people who deploy technologies and bring in automation that can turn workplaces upside down. To survive, they count on being smart, self-reliant and one step ahead. Over the years, Computerworld reporter Patrick Thibodeau has interviewed scores of IT workers who trained their visa-holding replacements. Though details each time may differ, they all tell the same basic story. There are many issues around high-skilled immigration, but to grasp the issue fully you need to understand how the H-1B program can affect American workers.

Submission + - The coral die-off crisis is a climate crime and Exxon fired the gun (theguardian.com) 1

mspohr writes: An article published by Bill McKibben in The Guardian points the finger at Exxon for spreading climate change denial which led to lack of action to prevent widespread coral die-off.
"We know the biggest culprits now, because great detective work by investigative journalists has uncovered key facts in the past year. The world’s biggest oil company, Exxon, knew everything there was to know about climate change by the late 1970s and early 1980s. Its scientists understood how much and how fast it was going to warm, and how much damage that was going to do. And the company knew the scientists were right: that’s why they started “climate-proofing” their own installations, for instance building their drilling rigs to accommodate the sea level rise they knew was coming.

What they didn’t do was tell the rest of us. Instead, they – and many other players in the fossil fuel industry – bankrolled the rise of the climate denial industry, helping fund the “thinktanks” and front groups that spent the last generation propagating the phoney idea that there was a deep debate about the reality of global warming. As a result, we’ve wasted a quarter century in a phoney argument about whether the climate was changing."

Submission + - How Wikipedia manages mental illness and suicide threats among its volunteers (backchannel.com)

mirandakatz writes: Wikipedia has some 68,000 active editors, and as with any given population, some of those people experience mental illnesses or disorders. The online encyclopedia is adamant that "Wikipedia is not therapy!", a statement that some find alienating, and despite that disclaimer, the site has had to come up with ways to respond when a volunteer is in crisis. In this longform narrative, we hear the stories of volunteers who've undergone crises either directly or tangentially related to Wikipedia, and we learn how the website handles—or attempts to handle—those situations.

Submission + - Researchers orbit a muon around an atom, confirm physics models are broken (arstechnica.com)

schwit1 writes: The proton's charge radius shouldn't change, and yet it appears to.

This “proton radius puzzle” suggests there may be something fundamentally wrong with our physics models. And the researchers who discovered it have now moved on to put a muon in orbit around deuterium, a heavier isotope of hydrogen. They confirm that the problem still exists, and there's no way of solving it with existing theories.

Submission + - SPAM: Holy Grail of energy policy in sight as battery technology smashes the old order 3

mdsolar writes: The world's next energy revolution is probably no more than five or ten years away. Cutting-edge research into cheap and clean forms of electricity storage is moving so fast that we may never again need to build 20th Century power plants in this country, let alone a nuclear white elephant such as Hinkley Point.

The US Energy Department is funding 75 projects developing electricity storage, mobilizing teams of scientists at Harvard, MIT, Stanford, and the elite Lawrence Livermore and Oak Ridge labs in a bid for what it calls the 'Holy Grail' of energy policy.

You can track what they are doing at the Advanced Research Projects Agency-Energy (ARPA-E). There are plans for hydrogen bromide, or zinc-air batteries, or storage in molten glass, or next-generation flywheels, many claiming "drastic improvements" that can slash storage costs by 80pc to 90pc and reach the magical figure of $100 per kilowatt hour in relatively short order.

“Storage is a huge deal,” says Ernest Moniz, the US Energy Secretary and himself a nuclear physicist. He is now confident that the US grid and power system will be completely "decarbonised" by the middle of the century.

Link to Original Source

Comment Re:what kind of answer do you want? (Score 1) 8

Three computers - you forgot about the SIM card.

On the good side, there is also Replicant, that attempts to replace everything they can with Open Source. Unfortunately I don't believe they are able to replace the baseband firmware, however I'm under the impression that they have been able to secure phones from interference by the baseband processor.

Slashdot Top Deals

If bankers can count, how come they have eight windows and only four tellers?

Working...