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Submission + - ICANN recommends TLDs like .txt -- and .exe (

fyngyrz writes: ICANN says, in part:

Given preliminary feedback that there is not a technical need to prevent file extensions as TLDs, as well as the lack of an authoritative source of common file extensions to draw from, staff determined that it is not workable to prevent common file extensions from being used as TLDs.

To summarize, it is the recommendation of the ICANN technical staff to allow applications for TLD strings that may also be commonly used for file extensions.

But will ICANN approve such applications? If so, we can all look forward to opportunities to click on...


Comment Re:Your car is not your car (Score 1) 211

...and the "cloud" -- if it's in the "cloud", someone else owns it. Even when they tell you you own it.

It's not on your hardware, it's not on your software, it's not in your storage, it's not on your premises, and you have zero control over any of the actual foregoing locations / instances.

But hey, everyone, keep that cloud-ward stampede going. They love ya for it.

Comment Tesla has control (Score 1) 211

All they could do to stop you from doing is voiding your warranty.

Perhaps not. As I understand it, the car is connected in order to facilitate software upgrade / maintainance. So they could tell the car it couldn't drive the next time you parked it for ten minutes, for instance.

I imagine that would land them in court -- but technically speaking, they could do it.

Comment Re:ASLR was a dumb idea while it lasted (Score 4, Interesting) 61

Yes it is but people have been trying to do that for 40 years and have not gotten it right yet so...

Wrong. Plenty of code correctness has been deployed in service of this goal.

Unfortunately, there are endemic economic and political reasons why we constantly choose the protocols and implementations that are bigger, hairier, and less continent.

All you need is a culture of kicking non-conforming implementations to the curb, and then the rigorous implementations have a chance to emerge from the weeds. Do we have such a culture? No—most of the time—no, we do not. Such a culture would cramp Megacorp style, and interfere with timeless value-adds, such as embrace and extend, closed ecosystem, DRM jungle, NIST-sanctioned algorithmic weevils, definition by implementation, documentation by implementation, etc. etc.

Far, far away in dull and dusty places like the Erlang OTP or Bernstein's qmail or Knuth's TeX—or perhaps even the Google protocol buffers for at least one lucky and unusually blessed language binding from the somewhat recent past—you just might find a rigorously coded parser or two.

For the most part, however, I agree. We'll probably never have rigorous parsers in a dominant culture of "screw everyone else", Wild West dysenteroperability.

Comment Re:Remote exploit (Score 1) 61

Most attacks these days are a sequence of memory safety violation followed by memory disclosure followed by arbitrary code execution. ASLR is meant to make the memory disclosure part harder, but there are now half a dozen known attack techniques that allow ASLR to be bypassed. Off the shelf attack toolkits will include these mechanisms, so it's a mistake to assume that an attacker won't be able to bypass it. It increases the barrier to entry from script kiddie with 5-year-old toys to script kiddie with new toys.

Comment Re:As much as I dislike Trump ... (Score 4, Insightful) 386

And yet time and again Clinton is used to point out this or that even though he hasn't been president for well over a decade.

Make your mind up. If the lies and criminal acts of Bush and Cheney can't be used in a discussion than neither can Bill Clinton.

And no, crimes of past president's are not irrelevant. They are very relevant since they show the hypocrisy of people who will excuse those crimes but suddenly become appalled when someone else does the exact same thing. If you didn't consider it a crime then you can't consider it a crime now.

You can't have it both ways hypocrite.

Comment Re:Because Windows Sucks (Score 4, Insightful) 238

>Windows may suck, but they own the hardware driver market,

Linux supports more hardware than Windows supports at one time. Linux even supports that pre-XP scanner that you had to throw out because Microsoft changed the driver model and the manufacturer said "well, the customers will just have to buy new ones."

>driver installation on linux vs windows

It's laughably easier on Linux. Indeed, there aren't these "driver disks" or ridiculously large "driver packs" with bloatware, Flash, Adobe Reader, and Ask toolbars and other totally unrelated junk.

>no games

Funny, Steam has plenty of games.

>but my (obscure game)

Ah, the last refuge of the Windows shill - windows is a game launcher.

>wider universe of valuable things

I find that the software available from the repos is surprisingly good /and/ is not laden with "appeal to the lowest denominator" graphics nonsense (virus scanners on Windows with animations to demonstrate to the user that it's "doing something" as a particularly egregious example). This nonsense is rife throughout the "windows universe of valuable things."

>daily use tasks Linux is better

Indeed. And less common tasks too.


Comment Re:Minefield (Score 1) 472

if people start getting blackballed, hired or fired for having expressed mere support for X political party or Y viewpoint.

What do you mean, start getting blackballed? Too young to remember the wholesale blackballing of actors because of their supposed views?

This doesn't even begin to touch the surface of the obvious and hidden blacklisting which goes on every day. Numerous studies have shown your name alone can get you blacklisted from a job.

States have had to pass laws to prevent all kinds of people and groups from blacklisting people for whatever reason.

Comment Re:space agency cooperation? (Score 3) 242

Of course NASA passed on decades of hard-won experience. They're not psychopaths.

It went something like this:

Dear ESA:

Hire only the best and the brightest, keep the group challenged and engaged for decade upon decade, with frequent launch opportunities pushing the boundary of the possible at each and every iteration.

N.B.: Sorry, there's no silver bullet.

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